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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I did the 2006-2007 ZX10R Shock Swap on my 2006 SV650 Naked and I thought I would share my experience, and try to lay some questions to rest in the process. To get around the picture quota I split this into 2 posts.

Swap Specs:
Bike: 2006 SV650 Naked (2nd Gen)
Rider: 190lbs (in skivvies) 205lbs (in riding gear)
Shock: 2006 Kawasaki ZX10R
Price: $60 Shipped (Owner claimed the shock was swapped during first oil change at 600 miles.)

Stock Shock Specs (SV650): 330mm, 430lb/in
Adjustments: Preload
Swap Shock Specs (ZX10R): 338mm, 465lb/in (EDIT)
Adjustments: Preload, Compression Damping, Rebound Damping

Overview: The 2006-2007 ZX10R shock has a slightly different design than previous years ZX10R, GXSR and ZX6R(636) shocks in that its reservoir is mounted perpendicular to the shock body (see picture below) and just below the upper shock mount as opposed to the more common angled reservoir location that protrudes up above the upper shock mount. I believe this design feature of the 2006-2007 ZX10R shock makes this shock the best swap option for the heavy rider (190lbs+) on a 2nd Gen Naked SV650 because no cutting of the stock components.

Follow the manual (links below) for shock removal and installation or search the forum.
SV650 (‘03+ Manual) - http://www.mediafire.com/?om0mpy1hijk
ZX10R (‘06/’07 Manual) - http://www.mediafire.com/?vitmgtj0fjm

Installation Tips:
Acquire one 2nd Gen SV650 naked. Here is mine, a red 2006.


Hang the rear of your bike off the ground to unload the suspension. Here is how I accomplished this.



Remove your old shock. Here you can see how much clearance there is for your new shock, looks like it should fit no cut, no problem.

Three bolts and it is out, pull it out from the bottom of the bike.


Get youself a 2006-2007 ZX10R Shock. Here is the comparison shot, the ZX10R shock is way nicer.


Make all your shock adjustments before installing the shock.
Baseline Shock Settings:
Preload (180mm Spring Length)
Rebound (Bottom Screw 2 Turns Counterclockwise from fully clockwise position)
Compression (Top Screw 4 Turns Counterclockwise from fully clockwise position)

Adjusted Shock Settings for 205lb Rider:
Preload (22mm Thread Showing)
Rebound (Bottom Screw 2 Turns Counterclockwise from fully clockwise position)
Compression (Top Screw 2.5 Turns Counterclockwise from fully clockwise position)

This is a shot of how I measured the preload adjustment.


You can see in this picture the perpendicular reservoir and how it differs from other years.



I though the new shock was going to fit fine but at least on the 2006 naked there is a minor clearance issue with the redundant and completely unnecessary plastic battery box cover/guard. I had to create the 2 little make shift tools pictured below using a ¼” socket and combination wrench along with a #2 phillips screwdriver bit and a little blue painters tape to remove the 3 screws holding on the guard.



Two of the screws are under the tool kit compartment the other is under the gas tank and requires you remove the two front screws and the tank hinge bolt to gain access to the screw. See pictures below. This ended up prolonging the install and being a bit of a pain because of the tight quarters. This task probably added 20-30 minutes of tinkering to the overall swap time just to figure what tools to use and how to get these screws out. Now that you know it shouldn’t take you long at all.




Here is the plastic piece you need to remove.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Continued.

You reuse your stock upper bolts and nut to mount the top of the new shock but the shock requires the factory ZX10R bottom mounting nut and 10x55 bolt. If they were not provided with your shock you will need to order them from your local Kawasaki Dealer.
Bolt Part #: 92153-1546
Nut Part #: 92210-1139
My Shock came both Kawasaki bolts. One 10mmx55mm and one 10mmx52mm.

Here I measured them.



At first glance I thought 52mm bolt was actually gonna be the better choice clearance wise.
52mm


55mm


After test fitting even though the 55mm has clearance problems the 52mm isn’t long enough to bite the lock nut, so you have to use the 55mm I used a couple of stainless 10mm washers under the bolt head to shim the bolt to the right and gain the needed clearance. You could grind the thread side of the bolt to shorten it as well, I thought the washers were an easier cleaner method. Don’t forget to use a thread locker such as blue loctite on your bolts too.


Here is the shock installed,very nice, and now with the guard removed, a perfect fit.


Here is a visual list of required tools.


This shock should install in the same manner on the 2nd Gen S models but I cannot confirm. If someone can confirm this please let me know and I will update this post accordingly.

Be sure to check your chain tension after the install.

Torque Specs:
Top and Bottom Nuts: 36ft/lbs
Link/Dogbone Nuts: 56.5ft/lbs

Length Notes:
The ZX10R shock is slightly longer than the stock shock by roughly 1/4 inch this will translate to slightly higher tail height and quicker turn in. This works for me, I was considering installing ½ inch raising links anyway but if this a problem you can find ½ or ¼ inch lowering links on ebay very cheap (under $20) to keep the suspension geometry closer to stock.

Spring Rate Notes:
The ZX10R spring rate is 35lb/in (EDIT) higher than the stock shock. Again this works in my favor because the stock shock is sprung light for a 120-140lb rider. The 465lb/in (EDIT) spring on the ZX10R shock is recommended for riders under 180lbs, it may be too stiff for very light riders.

Conclusion:
To me there are 3 benefits to this swap. The first is obviously a fully adjustable rear shock upgrade over the mediocre stock shock at a more than reasonable price. The second is that it is a virtually hassle free swap that doesn’t require any modification to other parts of your bike. To me this was the deciding factor for this shock and the deal breaker for all others. If I couldn’t have done this swap hack free I was gonna save for a bolt on Ohlins or Penske. This shock swap is obviously not as nice or as perfectly tuned as an Ohlins or Penske would be but for the money it can’t be beat and in the meantime (maybe forever) it will help a lot in balancing out the performance of the front and rear of my SV after I add new springs, oil, gold valves and a damper rod kit to my forks. And third, considering the money we spend on visual modifications like wheel stripes ($30) and seat cowls ($80) this shock is almost worth the $60 I paid for its visual appeal alone, the gold body and red spring look sweet on my red ’06 SV.

I still have to do some tinkering to get the settings dialed in and sag set correctly but I noticed a dramatic difference in corner feel immediately, I can’t wait to get my front end upgrades done now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nice write-up. Just an editorial: the Race Tech website shows the 06-07 ZX10R shock spring rate as being 8.3 kg/mm or ~465 lb/in
Thanks, I would assume Race Tech to be the correct spec then. I just got my specs from the board FAQ regarding suspension (http://forum.svrider.com/showthread.php?t=45179) but they appear to be for the '04 ZX10R which means these '06-'07 swap would actually be better for a larger majority for riders, and might a be a bit light for me but it doesn't feel like it is, I am still super happy.
 

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'06-'07 swap would actually be better for a larger majority for riders, and might a be a bit light for me but it doesn't feel like it is, I am still super happy.
It certainly is better than the stock shock. I replaced my fork springs at the same time, and it's made a world of difference.

Once I get some more miles on the stock tires, new tires will be my next upgrade. Conti road attacks, perhaps...
 

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I used a rear swing arm stand to lift the back of the bike up and then slid the jack stands under the pegs.

I would like to add a quick suggestion. Use a zip tie and apply the front brakes. This will help keep the bike from rocking while you're loosening, tightening, and torquing the bolts. Dont want the bike to roll off the jack stands and falling over.
 

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Nice write up, hope you like your new suspension. FWIW this shock works even better on an 03. With that model years sub frame no mods or cutting to the bike are necessary. The shock bolts right up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I plan on flipping my pegs and using jack stands to lift the bike, but what did you do to actually jack the bike up?
I used a tie down strap and a cable puller to crank the rear end up, it is shown in the first couple pictures.

I would like to add a quick suggestion. Use a zip tie and apply the front brakes.
I did this as well, forgot to mention it in the write-up.

FWIW this shock works even better on an 03. With that model years sub frame no mods or cutting to the bike are necessary. The shock bolts right up.
If removing a little plastic panel is a problem it is technically a better swap on the '03 but in my opinion it is still the best available swap for all 2nd Gens other than aftermarket and removing three extra screws isn't a big deal, still no cutting involved and besides removing the plastic panel helps you reduce unecessary weight! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I don't have a garage or any overhead area where I could use a ratchet strap to lift the bike. Hmmm.
Do you have a rear stand? Do what the previous poster did.
"I used a rear swing arm stand to lift the back of the bike up and then slid the jack stands under the pegs."

You may also be able to use a floor jack or a OEM car jack if you own a car to the rear off the ground then do the peg flip thing.
 

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<<SNIP>> Use a zip tie and apply the front brakes. This will help keep the bike from rocking while you're loosening, tightening, and torquing the bolts. Dont want the bike to roll off the jack stands and falling over.
This is a great suggestion that should not be overlooked. I put a chock in front of my wheel when its up on the pit stand, but tying the brake lever is even better.

Think I'll try a Velcro strap to see how that works.

.. Gregg
 

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I don't have a garage or any overhead area where I could use a ratchet strap to lift the bike. Hmmm.
IF you are REALLY brave or ghetto and have a friend to help (I do not suggest this.....)

You can slide the jack stand under the right side peg with the bike on the kick stand. Then.... with the right peg already over the jack stand, you can leverage the bike onto the jack stand on the right and elevate the left side to slide the jack stand under the left peg.


*note* Spend the $30-$50 and get a rear stand.

If you dont use straps to hold the wheel, with the dogbones disconnected, you can manipulate the swingarm up and down to get the bolts/holes lined up without much effort.
 
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