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Discussion Starter #1
I love the SV650 engine. I love the smoothness, I love the power, and no other bike in its class can touch it...if the year is 1999. Unfortunately it is 21 years later, and most consider the FZ07 to have a superior powerplant. Will Suzuki ever replace the SV engine with another revolutionary lump? Maybe Suzuki will do what Ducati did with their 1980 Pantah engine that they still use in the Scrambler. Still Ducati took the drastic step of changing their first belt drive motor from a 600 to a 800.
 

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I think they would be better off upgrading the rest of the bike around the engine at this point. Give it ride modes, TC, or heaven forbid some real suspension. Saying the MT07 is better than the SV is like saying Ford is better than Chevy (or vice versa, I don't really like either). They both make good engine platforms and people will pick the one they prefer.
As for the actual question, they'll upgrade it if they need to for Euro 5 (or whatever is next), that seems to be the driving factor behind many of the new engine platforms that have popped up recently. That said, the Gen 3 did get a complete redesign, it's not an SFV transplant.
 

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What's your source for saying that "most consider the MT07 engine superior"? The MT engine is great but has a different character. More torque and grunt, but less versatile across the Rev range. I wouldn't say it's better in general.
I don't have high hopes that Suzuki will change its strategy of making solid budget bikes. It's their niche and they really only have to compete with other Japanese manufacturers in it. I doubt they'll go after the European brands by offering more expensive components and more frequent design updates.
They should however get a new design team to bring their bikes to the 21st century...
 

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It would be a shame to see this V twin engine disappear and be replaced by yet another parallel twin which seems to be the go to engine configuration these days. Apparently this is because of their efficiency and low manufacturing cost. Personally, unless they are have a 270 degree firing order I find them boring and soulless compared to the vibes and sound of a V Twin. What I love about the 645cc SV engine is that it has the classic V twin characteristic of low down torque yet still revs out freely and happily - best of both worlds.
Yes, the design and styling dept at Suzuki needs a shake up. Woeful in recent years.

Regarding the MT-07: My main riding partner has one of these and I've ridden it many times. Yes it's a great parallel twin engine, equal to the SV but not superior in my eyes. Yamaha did a good job on the styling and it sells. Take note Suzuki.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It would be a shame to see this V twin engine disappear and be replaced by yet another parallel twin which seems to be the go to engine configuration these days. Apparently this is because of their efficiency and low manufacturing cost. Personally, unless they are have a 270 degree firing order I find them boring and soulless compared to the vibes and sound of a V Twin.

Regarding the MT-07: My main riding partner has one of these and I've ridden it many times. Yes it's a great parallel twin engine, equal to the SV but not superior in my eyes. Yamaha did a good job on the styling and it sells. Take note Suzuki.
Agreed about the v-twin. I've owned 10+ motorcycles, and the two bikes I keep in my garage are a Monster and a SV650. Part of me wonders if a new v-twin is even commercially viable. A new engine means new tooling, which means a higher price tag. That price tag would be competing against bikes with cheaper, and in one instance more torquey, parallel twin designs. That wasn't the case when the SV first came around and the competition had 4 pisons.

By no means do I think the SV engine is outdated. At the same time the SV engine is no longer advanced, Yamaha has at least caught up, and at some point the current SV engine will be a dinosaur compared to the competition.

*Note: Some googling suggests the FZ07 i2 engine is actually heavier at ~130 pounds than the ~120 pound v2 in the SV. This tells me that Suzuki's best path to sustaining the SV is to immediately lighten the rest of the bike by 20 lbs while working on boring the lump to 700cc's.
 

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Anytime soon?

No.

The engine's competitive in the segment, yet unique -- it's a V-twin, with its own desirable characteristics.

Heck, Suzuki hasn't changed their 1000 cc V-Twin and that one's been around, only periodically revised and never completely reengineered, since '97!

Unless the motorcycle industry reverses its slide, hard to imagine replacement of this beloved middleweight V.
 

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The aftermarket supports the SV650, so you can build yourself an 800+cc resto-mod SV. (Overbored cylinders & stroker crank, prolly should replace the con rods and bearings while you're at it.) But as noted, economic circumstances dictate what manufacturers are able to do.
 

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No.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Everything imaginable will be discontinued at some point. Live for the moment
I do, but I wish Suzuki would live less in the past. I love much about my '17 SV, but I don't love the engine as much as I did a decade ago.

With consumer demand dropping due to the Coronavirus, any new SV tooling might have been pushed back a year or two.
 
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