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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I mounted a new set of tires today, and had a brain fart and mounted the rear backwards, where the tread pattern matches front to back. If the front pushes water out to the sides like this /\ , why would the rear seem to squeeze the water to the center like this \/ ?
I am going to put it on the right way tomorrow :sbmfacepalm:, but it got me to wondering about this . Any tire gurus out there know the answer?
 

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No guru, but the front tire is for stopping and the rear is for pushing.
 

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I assumes it's because you steer backwards.

Look on the side of the tire for the direction of rotation arrow. I always felt like the front tire was "backwards" and the rear tire is correct.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I just hopped on because I had a brainstorm. Trashcan had the same idea. If you accidentally spun the tire in rain, THEN it would push the water out to the sides, and help regain traction.
Look on the side of the tire for the direction of rotation arrow. I always felt like the front tire was "backwards" and the rear tire is correct.
I was having a look at the tires after my test ride, when I noticed that the arrows were pointing the wrong way :facepalm:

At work I tell the new guys that the way you learn is by making a mistake that causes a pain in the @$$ :p You don't do it again :) You eventually make each mistake once, then your mistake ratio drastically drops :naughty:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It did feel a little bit squirrely in the rear, sort of greasy if that makes sense, which I attributed to new tire slickness... I'll see if that goes away when I fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was trying to give some lean to scuff up more of the tire, but conservatively.
 

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when your leaning the rear tire pattern is designed to shed water to the outside of the turn ranther than the inside.

Ive found if you take a rag, spray some brake clean and swipe a new tire really fast in sections, it takes the new tire "film" off for a much shorter, if any break in. I did this and hit the canyons literally within and hour of my tires being installed.
 

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I just hopped on because I had a brainstorm. Trashcan had the same idea. If you accidentally spun the tire in rain, THEN it would push the water out to the sides, and help regain traction.


I was having a look at the tires after my test ride, when I noticed that the arrows were pointing the wrong way :facepalm:

At work I tell the new guys that the way you learn is by making a mistake that causes a pain in the @$$ :p You don't do it again :) You eventually make each mistake once, then your mistake ratio drastically drops :naughty:
My guess was that the front is installed backwards.

I like the idea of what is mentioned in regards to tread design for stopping and pushing water out in case of a skid. I'm pretty certain tire manufacturers have taken tread design into consideration regarding these situations many years ago ;-) Otherwise why are tires so expensive? :dontknow:
 

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I just put a set of Pilot Road 3s on my SV and I was also confused about the difference between the tread patterns between the front and back tires. My limited understanding was always that the tread on bike tires is designed to channel the water from the center to the outside, and tires I had seen always seemed to fit the pattern that makes intuitive sense for that purpose - when rotating forward the grooves start at the center and move out.

The rear tire fit that pattern when installed according to the arrows, but when I looked at the arrows on the front they appeared to be backwards. Concerned that the tire had manufacturing flaws (arrows stamped backward), I spent some time searching the internet for information. The best I could find was on the Michelin website itself. They don't address this question specifically, but they have some videos about the tires and you can clearly see in close ups that the front tires are mounted in the way that the arrows on mine indicate. Also, the tire has direction arrows on the sidewall and on the edge of the tread, so it seems unlikely that they would have screwed both of them up.

It would be cool to get feedback on this from somebody that understands tire engineering considerations.
 

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the tire should have a direction of rotation marked right on the side. Follow that.


And brand new tires have a release compound on them from the factory. That will cause the slick feeling and has caused plenty of crashes. ( like the "brand new gixxer" crash video. the fella pulls out of the dealership and goes a few yards before taking a nice digger) Take it easy for a long time. I've heard anywhere from 100 to 200 miles as a safety buffer.
 

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when your leaning the rear tire pattern is designed to shed water to the outside of the turn ranther than the inside.

Ive found if you take a rag, spray some brake clean and swipe a new tire really fast in sections, it takes the new tire "film" off for a much shorter, if any break in. I did this and hit the canyons literally within and hour of my tires being installed.
Exactly this. With new tires, you want to get rid of that "glossy film" right away by just getting a wet towel of some sorts and just start rubbing it down. The manager of cycle gear in my area and a close friend who is a mechanic on bikes told me that it's essential you do that in order to ride right away.
 

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Michelin responded to the questions I sent them about this with some generic BS. I suppose that they don't want to divulge any proprietary information.

First of all, we appreciate your purchase and we value your questions and concerns regarding the Michelin Pilot Road 3 tires. We recommend that the Michelin Pilot Road 3 tires front and rear are mounted with the arrow facing the direction of travel. However, you are exactly right regarding the front tire tread showing a backward direction. The front tire designs are designed this way for better stopping, control and performance. As long as the arrows are facing the direction of travel, your tires will perform well.

The theory behind the front tires tread showing a different direction is due to better stopping, cornering, wet and dry performance.
 
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