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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Serious question for those that have done it or will do it.

It goes without saying that there are a lot of SV Owners that go with this mod. Without a doubt, the SV's suspension suck-diddly-ucks. I have already gone with a GSXR-750 shock and Racetech Springs and Emu's in my OEM fork set-up and that was an incredible night & day transition. I can get GSXR front end parts locally pretty much anytime I want and the coin isn't an issue.

I just want to know in what way will I be improving my bike from its current set-up if I went with this mod?
 

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I have an 03sv650s silvere/full lowers as well.
The bike will not dive as much when engine breaking or applying the front brakes.
Also it wont rise as much when accelerating.

Overall, it feels a lot more stable in all maneuvers. Just get some raised clip-ons to clear your plastics.

That is on top of the obvious + of the look of bike.

Many use the GSX-R's front end (04-05 gsxr600/750 or 03-04 gsxr1000) because it the triple tree dimensions are exactly the same as the stock ones. But I've heard of other dudes using R6 front ends... Depends on your taste.
 

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Dive is a function of spring rate and damping. Lift under acceleration is a function of static preload setting. GSXR forks will drop the front end a good bit, so you will get faster turn-in at some cost to directional stability. The same effect can be achieved by pulling the fork legs up or using shorter dogbones, raising the tail up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Dive is a function of spring rate and damping. Lift under acceleration is a function of static preload setting. GSXR forks will drop the front end a good bit, so you will get faster turn-in at some cost to directional stability. The same effect can be achieved by pulling the fork legs up or using shorter dogbones, raising the tail up.
So what you're saying, Andy is that there's a geometry change as well? Though I wouldn't mind running a track sometime, I'm not a "Track Rider" per se. I use the bike for recreation jaunts and occassionally commute locally. Am I wrong to construe that this might be a mod that only a kneedragger could love?
 

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I want to do it because it looks cool. I know I can respring and emu my forks for less money and have them perform very well. I wouldn't mind upgraded brakes either. Technically, you should probably respring any GSXR forks you get for your weight as well unless they work best as they are stock for you
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yeah, the brake factor interests me, as well. Part of my reason for considering the whole mess not to mention that it's just fun tweakin' stuff.
 

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The geometry change is due to the GSXR forks being shorter. As I said, you can accomplish the same change by lifting the fork legs in the triple clamps.

Most people who race have said that there is no great benefit of the GSXR forks vs. well set-up SV forks. "Well set-up" is the key phrase here. It's not as easy to change compression and rebound damping on SV forks with emulators. So there is a possible benefit there.

Stock SV brakes will easily lift the back tire off the ground, and are well-modulated and easy to use (unless they're not maintained properly, in which case the same could be said for GSXR brakes).

So there are downsides and benefits to doing the swap. You have to decide if it's worth it to you.
 

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What no one has mentioned is that the GSXR forks are sturdier and less prone to flex (the tubes are significantly larger in diameter). I've only actually ridden the stock SV forks hard enough to get them to flex to the point where I could feel it one or two times, but I seriously doubt the GSXR forks would be prone to the same degree given my recent experiences on the GSXR 750.

If I had it to do over, I would have spent the money on the GSXR front end. It's not only a noticeable improvement in looks, but also in ride quality and stability and the brakes are awesome.
 

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The geometry change is due to the GSXR forks being shorter. As I said, you can accomplish the same change by lifting the fork legs in the triple clamps.

Most people who race have said that there is no great benefit of the GSXR forks vs. well set-up SV forks. "Well set-up" is the key phrase here. It's not as easy to change compression and rebound damping on SV forks with emulators. So there is a possible benefit there.

Stock SV brakes will easily lift the back tire off the ground, and are well-modulated and easy to use (unless they're not maintained properly, in which case the same could be said for GSXR brakes).

So there are downsides and benefits to doing the swap. You have to decide if it's worth it to you.
the point is, you can "upgrade" the front end of the sv and sell the stock sv parts to save money, you can get away with doing it cheaper ther upgrading the sv forks
 

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I want to do it because it looks cool. I know I can respring and emu my forks for less money and have them perform very well. I wouldn't mind upgraded brakes either. Technically, you should probably respring any GSXR forks you get for your weight as well unless they work best as they are stock for you
+1, unless you're going to respring/valve the GSXR forks they aren't really an improvement (the brakes are, but not the suspension) over a properly sprung set of SV forks from what I've read and experienced.

My SV currently has stock forks with the springs and oil set for my weight. So far I've been on 2 other SVs with GSXR front ends, a first gen just for a run around the block and a second gen for about 10 miles of nice country roads. The first gen had stock internals and felt about the same as my forks in term of spring rate, but it was for a very short distance so it's not a great comparison. The guy that I switched with did mention that he liked the feel of my setup better but that could alsobe the change from clipons to mx bas as well. The other was on a ride upstate and the owner had sent out the forks to have them dialed in for his size/style of riding. He was about my size (maybe 15lbs lighter or so) but a more agressive rider than I am...I really liked his setup and it convinced me to start picking up the parts for a swap of my own. I'll be sending the legs to NV for setup.
 
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