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Which group of riders has a higher mortality rate?

  • Sportbike riders

    Votes: 100 37.3%
  • Cruiser riders

    Votes: 82 30.6%
  • Neither is more likely than the other

    Votes: 86 32.1%
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Discussion Starter #1
I've had this question spinning around in my head for some time now. I've posed it to a few people with different opinions for both sides. I figured it would make for an interesting discussion, or better yet, perhaps someone will be able to produce some solid statistics to help answer the question.

Which group of riders has a higher mortality rate, Cruiser riders or Sportbike riders?

Here are the arguments I came up with or have been posed to me by others in the discussion:

I think that Sportbike riders in general are more apt to wear at least basic gear (Helmet, gloves, ect.) than are Cruiser riders.

I (working as a bartender) have noticed that Cruiser riders seem more likely to partake in alcoholic beverage consumption and operate thier machines.

A Cruiser style bike may be less agile in avoiding a situation before it becomes an accident.

The general public seems to think that Sportbike riders would be more prone to be in a fatal accident due to the following:

A Sportbike rider will cruise around at a higher average speed therefore reducing thier ability to react.

Sportbike riders would be more likely to ride "hooligan," and put themselves in a bad situation.

Sportbikes are just more dangerous than a Cruiser type of bike.

Fast = Deadly


Discuss.
 

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King of D'bags
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Somebody needs to contact the NHTSA and IIHS for data and make it VERY public. That would answer the eternal question.
 

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I (working as a bartender) have noticed that Cruiser riders seem more likely to partake in alcoholic beverage consumption and operate thier machines.
I think the above is your #1 reason the cruiser crowd has a higher mortality rate according to statistics that I've seen...
 

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I don't know the numbers off hand, but the county Daytona is in is annually the highest in motorcycle fatalities and they're all cruisers. On the other hand the squidiness factor related to sportbikes may off set those consentrated numbers. I am curious to know though, but I'm guessing it's a wash.
 

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I live in Australia, where it may be different, but out here I think the mortality rate on the road is probably about the same.

Cruiser riders, however, seem to be more likely to kill each other in bars with broken beer bottles or sawn off shotguns. Should this be factored into the stats?
 

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I would say it depends on the area. Most cruisers I see on the road stay in their lane, don't whiteline or split lanes. They all keep a slow speed. They really don't need to be nimble because they really don't ride in a way that they need to avoid anything(they ride slow).

Sportbike riders are another story. Most inexperienced riders are on ss bike, more risks are being taken... etc
 

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Interesting question. I suspect the insurance institutes would hold a lot of valuable information on this.
 

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I voted that it's about the same. I have no data to back that up, but around me the non-helmet wearing cruiser riders are about as equal as the squids with their helmet hanging off the back of the bike. The cruiser riders who wear helmets are about as equal as the helmet wearing sport bike riders as well.
 

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It is a 100% certainty that we are all going to die.
 

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You do mean MORTALITY (actual casualties) and not INJURY, right?

I'm guessing pretty evenly spread overall.


edit -
It is a 100% certainty that we are all going to die.
LOL... valid point. We all have a 100% mortality rate, eventually. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It is a 100% certainty that we are all going to die.
How philosophical of you...the question is "Who is more likey to reach that inevitability while operating a two wheeled motorized machine?"

Trambo said:
You do mean MORTALITY (actual casualties) and not INJURY, right?
Yes, the question is who is more likely to die, not who is more likely to be in an accident in general. However, I will allow discussion of either variety simply because I think it's a good topic.
 

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the gun isnt dangerous the shooter is.
a bike isnt dangerous the rider is.

I hate to say it but I'd say cruisers might have a better life chance even though sportbikes can stop, accelerate and turn better than a cruiser - we tend to get more of the idiots and darwin grabs more people on sportbikes it seems.

granted cruisers drink but they also dont get stupid (usually) just bc they know they can like many sportbike riders do.


Its not the bike though its the rider...you can be stupid on a 250cc just as u can be stupid on a sportster.
 

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SV Hadder
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WebBikeWorld said:
Report Conclusions: Findings from the FARS (Fatality Analysis Reporting System) data illustrate possible reasons for motorcyclist fatalities in single vehicle motorcycle crashes:
  • Helmet use among fatally injured motorcyclists below 50 percent
  • More motorcyclist fatalities are occurring on rural roads
  • High blood alcohol levels are a major problem among motorcycle operators
  • Half of the fatalities are related to negotiating a curve prior to the crash
  • Over 80 percent of the fatalities occur off roadway
  • Undivided roadways account for a majority of the fatalities
  • Almost two thirds of the fatalities were associated with speeding as an operator contributing factor in the crash
  • Almost 60 percent of motorcyclist fatalities occur at night
  • Collision with a fixed object is a significant factor in over half of the fatalities
  • Braking and steering maneuvers possibly contribute for almost 25 percent of the fatalities
  • More riders age 40 and over are getting killed
  • Almost one third of the fatally injured operators did not have a proper license
1998 Motorcycle Accident Statistics:
  • 2,284 motorcyclists died and approximately 49,000 were injured in highway crashes in the United States.
  • Per mile traveled in 1998, a motorcyclist is approximately 16 times more likely to die in a crash than an automobile occupant. And 3x (times) as likely to be injured.
  • Head injury is a leading cause of death in motorcycle crashes.
  • In 1998, 46% of fatally injured motorcycle drivers were not wearing helmets at the time of the crash.
  • NHTSA estimates that motorcycle helmets reduce the likelihood of a fatality by 29% in a crash.
  • In 1998, 41% of all motorcycle drivers involved in fatal crashes were speeding.
  • Nearly one out of five motorcycle drivers (18%) involved in fatal crashes in 1998 was operating with an invalid license at the time of the collision.
  • Motorcycle drivers involved in fatal crashes in 1998 had higher intoxication rates than any other type of motor vehicle driver at 31%.
  • In 1998, 500 motorcyclists lives were saved due to helmet usage; 307 could have been saved.
From the report:

NHTSA said:
The largest number of motorcyclist fatalities still occurs in the 501-1,000 cc engine group.
I think that leaves the majority of harley's out.

full report here: http://www.webbikeworld.com/Motorcycle-Safety/809-360.pdf
 

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I think that leaves the majority of harley's out.
True - but HD's Big Twins only account for a part of all cruisers on the road. The 883 Sportsters fall into that 501-1000 CC class also. LOTS of Metric cruisers in that class, also.

This really is a good, thought-provoking discussion.

I wonder what the poll results would be if this same question was posted on a Cruiser website? :D
 

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ahhhhh the hurt report gotta love it...they are trying to fund a new one u know!!!


there are several cruisers out there under 1000cc's tho. look at the kawi vulcan 500 - a starter bike for alot of cruiser type people, the sportster, honda shadows (i think) and the sportster of course!


but if that was the case then insurance would be cheaper for anything OVER 1000cc's right? ask ur friend who rides the zx14...you'll see it aint the case.
 

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the gun isnt dangerous the shooter is.
a bike isnt dangerous the rider is.
Along those lines, my thoughts are that I think that the kinds of people that are frequently attracted to sport bikes are inherently less cautious than the kinds of people attracted to cruisers.

That being said, I'm sure glad to have a girl's bike, as it fits into neither the sport bike nor the cruiser category... I'm gonna live forever! ;D
 

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Its not the bike though its the rider...you can be stupid on a 250cc just as u can be stupid on a sportster.
You're more likely to walk away from stupidity on a small bike with less power...

So are the actual statistics out there at all or is this just opinion?
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
That being said, I'm sure glad to have a girl's bike, as it fits into neither the sport bike nor the cruiser category... I'm gonna live forever! ;D
You haven't visited the Suzuki Website lately have you?!? You sir ride a Sportbike, sorry to break the news to you. YOU'RE DOOMED!!!! :nana:

nyc rugby said:
You're more likely to walk away from stupidity on a small bike with less power...
This in not always true though, my sister's best friend died when she fell off the back of her husband's bike when they were turning around on a residential street just tooling around. While this may or may not have been a fluke, it doesn't always take much of a whack on the head to render you terminal.
 

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but if that was the case then insurance would be cheaper for anything OVER 1000cc's right? ask ur friend who rides the zx14...you'll see it aint the case.
remember, these statistics are about deaths. insurance rates are factored on likeliness of repairing or replacing the bike.


The report also shows the majority of deaths in the 20-29 age range.
 
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