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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone.
So ive got a 1st gen SV track bike. not a race bike at all.
The front forks were bone stock
and they replaced the stock sv shock with the ZX10R shock

I went ahead and put some heavier sonic springs in the front end with some 20wt oil.

but my next step is what im not sure of.

I'd dont know how good that stock ZX10R shock is going to be on the track for my portly ass and was hoping to score a used fox, ohlins or penske off ebay or one of the parts classifieds.
But i also know that i need to get the front end completely sorted out.

im coming off of an F3 that had a fully adjustable front end and a fox double clicker rear (which i loved)

ive had the bike on the track for 2 practice sessions. And while i cant complain about the rear feel, the front gave me no feel at all. I might have too much oil in the forks i was told so i was going to drain and reinstall to get the proper level.
while the rear feel seemed fine, the 2 sessions that i had out there gave me a very very odd wear pattern on the left side of the tire (Jennings GP, im used to that track destroying my tires, but not in this manner).

My times were less than stellar compared to my old F3, so Im wondering what direction to go first in correcting my suspension. The engine is stock, its got a scorpion slip on, paper filter, and i dont know the current jetting but we're not putting out much if any more than bone stock power.

i say what direction should i head first since im only going to be able to do one upgrade at a time.
 

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When it comes to suspension, I bring my boingers to the pro's...

Like my suspension guy says... "If you can't afford to do it right, how are you gonna afford to do it over?"


For what it's worth, I've got a racetech front end with emulators & an Ohlins shock. Good suspension is worth its weight in gold (and usually costs twice as much! :D )
 

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I don’t like to put machinery ahead of the rider, but honestly the first thing you need to do with a new bike is make sure there isn’t anything wrong with it. A couple of things you can do yourself ...like make sure the forks aren’t bound up and that the rear wheel is aligned.

The other things you need to check probably require an expert (and their equipment). The frame needs to be straight (inspection usually ~$100) and the geometry should also be checked (varies in price but I consider this an expensive item). When they check the geometry you're probably going to be told you need a rear shock.

So, make sure your frame is straight and your wheels are lined up and put a good shock in there.

Then ride it until you know for sure what you want to change next. Take your time getting used to the bike, you'll find that it goes faster and faster without having to do anything to it :)
 

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front suspension always comes first, then the rear.
 

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front suspension always comes first, then the rear.
I dunno... I always thought of the chassis as more as a system, you'd benefit most by doing both at the same time.

I mean yeah, absolutely, you can do it one step at a time if you can't do both & do just the forks before the shock, but why do you favor it that way instead of doing the shock before the forks? Think the order of operations makes that much of a difference?
 

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i answered his question. he said he was going to do one at a time. the front is more important to go fast.
 

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because the real difference in a fast racer and an average racer is corner entry and trusting the front end. imo, most racers can carry similar mid corner speed, and i'd say are closer in exit speeds too. the place i make most of my time on slow riders during practice sessions is without a doubt on the brakes on corner entry.
 

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Hi everyone.
So ive got a 1st gen SV track bike. not a race bike at all.
The front forks were bone stock
and they replaced the stock sv shock with the ZX10R shock

I went ahead and put some heavier sonic springs in the front end with some 20wt oil.

but my next step is what im not sure of.

I'd dont know how good that stock ZX10R shock is going to be on the track for my portly ass and was hoping to score a used fox, ohlins or penske off ebay or one of the parts classifieds.
But i also know that i need to get the front end completely sorted out.

im coming off of an F3 that had a fully adjustable front end and a fox double clicker rear (which i loved)

ive had the bike on the track for 2 practice sessions. And while i cant complain about the rear feel, the front gave me no feel at all. I might have too much oil in the forks i was told so i was going to drain and reinstall to get the proper level.
while the rear feel seemed fine, the 2 sessions that i had out there gave me a very very odd wear pattern on the left side of the tire (Jennings GP, im used to that track destroying my tires, but not in this manner).

My times were less than stellar compared to my old F3, so Im wondering what direction to go first in correcting my suspension. The engine is stock, its got a scorpion slip on, paper filter, and i dont know the current jetting but we're not putting out much if any more than bone stock power.

i say what direction should i head first since im only going to be able to do one upgrade at a time.
Given that you've already done springs up front I'd get a good shock next. Part of the lack of front end feel is likely due to not enough rear ride height.

On the front, what are the sag numbers and what is your oil level set at??
 

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and i'd bet having ridden jennings a thousand laps, that the odd front wear pattern on your tires was due to lack of rebound in the front forks.
 

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because the real difference in a fast racer and an average racer is corner entry and trusting the front end. imo, most racers can carry similar mid corner speed, and i'd say are closer in exit speeds too. the place i make most of my time on slow riders during practice sessions is without a doubt on the brakes on corner entry.
Ah ok, yeah, I agree & my experience tells me the same.

Guess my brain was in "tailor the answer for a track day rider not racer" mode, know what I mean?
 

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because the real difference in a fast racer and an average racer is corner entry and trusting the front end. imo, most racers can carry similar mid corner speed, and i'd say are closer in exit speeds too. the place i make most of my time on slow riders during practice sessions is without a doubt on the brakes on corner entry.
Right on!!!!!! and A-mehhhheennnnn!

Fullmetal,

As some have already said, setting up the front is extreemly important. You stated you put in new springs.
Did you put in a emulator and conduct the required opening of the fluid holes?
Did you set the sag? Ride height?
Did you measure your trail? Some racers lower there front as much as 10mm to get it where they can feel the front and get the turn in they like.

Rear shock might need to be rebuilt for the SV which is a lighter bike. Also is the rear spring the correct one your you?

Lastly
Did you take it to a expert SV guy who knows SV suspentions and can help you.
 

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Good point! This is really the last place you should ask serious questions :)
Again very funny and I think you know what I mean.... Talking to a guy as your setting up the front for your weight and riding style is much more informative that reading it via 300 opinions spread over 150 posts. :)~
 

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i dont get scared on corner entry until the clip ons start turning in a little towards the tank. when i feel that, i get a little concerned. :D
 

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i dont get scared on corner entry until the clip ons start turning in a little towards the tank. when i feel that, i get a little concerned. :D
LOL Yah think? Id be concerned that the wall is comming up a little faster than Id like it too as every thing else is in slow motion moving past me...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
i had my buddy come over who used to race the first gen SV and had everything dialed in to help me with my suspension after i installed the fork springs

i threw in 1.1kg sonic springs and 20# oil (didnt know at that time that i should have order 30#

do not have emulators in the front yet, as thats the fork im at.
rear sag was set at 30mm as was the front.

the forks were set 5mm above the triple

the odd wear that i mentioned was on the rear not the front tire. It looked like the rubber was just shearing off rather than the gumming that i normally get at Jennings. While not as much time there as Kris, it is a track that i've spent a ton of time on and know what to expect.

im about 250 with gear so i have no idea what that rear spring should be other than a lot heavier than what the ZX10r shock is probably rated for.
 
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