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My 2005 SV650 does not qualify for FEMA relief, so it's up to me to fix it. Was wondering where I should start. When I knew if was going under I removed the battery. The handlebars and switches did not go under, the sea water only covered the S logo on the tank for 3 hours. Next day I removed spark plugs and spun in over by pushing it in 6th gear up and down the street ... did not see any water come out, but there was moisture on the plugs. Moving back to FL in 5 days and wonder if I should tow it with me and fix it or just writer it off.
Would appreciate any and all ideas. Thanks, Paul
 

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Wash the hell out of every part of it with fresh water. Get the salt out of everything you can as soon as you can. I mean prop up the tank and hose everything you can to get the salt off everything possible. Change the oil. Then I would give it whirl.

I would also think real hard about pulling the suspension linkage apart and greasing that too. Good luck...
 

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I fixed a TU200 that was flooded. The process was what you already did, pull the plugs and turn it over. For the crankcase I filled it up all the way to push any water out, after that I changed the oil and filled back to regular level. Ran the bike for a minute, drained and changed the oil again, it took about 8 oil changes before the oil was coming out clear. Don't run the bike for more then a few minutes until the oil is clear. Wasn't that hard to fix.
 

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I have never dealt with salt but I have drown fourwheelers and dealt with things flooded with fresh water, my best trick has to been pull the highest plug I can find on the engine and spark plugs and fill it completely with diesel untill it starts pushing water out, do that two or three times then about two or three oil changes after it is left to drain over night.
 

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The wheel bearings have seals, but I'm wondering how effective they are for total submersion in salt water? If it were me, the bearings would need changing as well as the aforementioned suspension linkages cleaned and lubed. The engine is sealed pretty well, so the foul water shouldn't get in through the outside so long as the intakes didn't get covered. Getting up to the tank emblem means the exhaust system got filled...so it would be best to remove and flush the heck out of it....leaving it will almost certainly cause lots of corrosion inside and that can make it to the cylinder through the exhaust ports. Clean, clean, clean!:)
 
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