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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I am supposed to pick up my SV650 this Friday ;D Since the current owner lives a couple of hours from me I am going to haul it back in my truck. Where are the best places on the bike to put the tie down straps. It is a 1st gen with a full fairing. Other than that it is all stock (but not for long).
 

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Harsh said:
Well, I am supposed to pick up my SV650 this Friday ;D  Since the current owner lives a couple of hours from me  I am going to haul it back in my truck.  Where are the best places on the bike to put the tie down straps.  It is a 1st gen with a full fairing.  Other than that it is all stock (but not for long).
the lower triple clamp is a good spot, but that depends on which bodywork you have. Also, you might want to consider getting a Canyon dancer...makes easy work of tying bikes. A couple of hints: Do NOT use the sidestand, the bike shoudl be vertical. Also, It's a good idea to tie it, then drive a few miles, then check it. That way you're sure that nothing slipped, etc. SOrry if this is old hat, but I thought I'd mention these things, just in case you didnt' have experience doing it.

Oh...if you have anchor points in the rear of the tow vehicle, you cna use the lower subframe mounts. This is my main anchor point for my SV in my trailer...I just use the front as saftey extras (this only works w/ mid-located anchor points).

Enjoy the bike!
 

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the lower triple is good if you have no bodywork, otherwise just use the handlebars. if using the handle bars, don't use the grips, but wrap the tie around the inside part of the handlebar just inside the grip. if the tiedowns pull the bike down & forward from these locations (and the bike is against the front of the bed, you won't even need anything for the rear.
 

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Loop your straps over the lower triple clamp. Criss-cross them so that the strap from the right loops over the left side of the clamp, and the strap from the left loops over the right side of the clamp. This will minimize interference with the lowest part ofthe fairing when you cinch it down. Two ratchet straps will hold the bike as tight as it needs to be held, but I always run a 'safety' loop around the rear rim in case the sh*t hits the fan.
 

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handlebar grips.  one on the left and another on the right.  Pin the front wheel against the front wall of trailer or truck.  Use enough tension to compress the the forks an inch or two.  Just don't put hooks on the grips, use straps.  to prevent the rear from sliding around, just wrap a rope or tie down around the bottom/back of the wheel and tire and connect the ends of the tie down to either side of the trailer and truck.

remember to re-check tension after a few miles.
 

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In the cab of the truck...ride the bike. ;D

I usually just tie to whatever you can grab safely. Ideally you want something that will keep the bike straight and the suspension compressed a bit. You dont even have to tie the back, but I usualy throw 1 through the luggage hoops for the heck of it. With dirtbikes I never did. Heck, with quads I just tie 1 strap forward and call it a day.
ac
 

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TotalBlackout said:
handlebar grips.  one on the left and another on the right.  Pin the front wheel against the front wall of trailer or truck.  Use enough tension to compress the the forks an inch or two.  Just don't put hooks on the grips, use straps.  to prevent the rear from sliding around, just wrap a rope or tie down around the bottom/back of the wheel and tire and connect the ends of the tie down to either side of the trailer and truck.

remember to re-check tension after a few miles.
You can fuck up your throttle with that. Bend the tube or mess up some of those little plastic bits in the housing.

I use 2 pairs of ratchet straps at minimum. One set for the lower triple, and one set on the subframe. Its a redundancy system, but the extra time it takes is worth it when you consider the possibility of what happens if you are only using two straps and one fails. I know someone who was towing his bike and someone elses on a moto trailer using only two straps for each. He had to do an emergency maneuver on the road and both bikes came out. One was totaled the other had $3,000+ in damage. An R6 and a CBR600RR.
 

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in a nekid, just thro the hooks over the handlebar on fared, get a canyon dancer or make one with some strapping , and use a couple pieces of 1½' pvc pipe as spacer to protect the grips.

2 tie downs is sufficient, compress forks about 30%, tape up excess tiedown strap so it doesn't flap around in the breeze
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replies...it is a stock fairing. I have four of the ratcheting style straps. What is this canyon dancer thing that has been mentioned and where can I get one?
 

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any bike dealer should have one
 

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If attaching to the handle bars just be careful of the wires and connectors. When i pickup my bike it had been tied down in a truck by the handle bars and the hook from the strap hit the clutch switch connector and bent it. so i have to bend it straight before the bike would start. Enjoy your SV.
 

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I use canyon dancers on the front and run a 12 foot rachet strap through the passenger peg brackets to keep the back end from bouncing around.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I found the Canyon Dancer (behold the power of Google). There is something in the back of my mind that tells me that it wouldn't be good for the handle bars, almost like it could bend them. It is probably more paranoia than anything, but after reading some of the above posts I am a little leary now.
 

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I recommend using soft ties (cheap at any dealer) around the upper triple clamp. If you are going very far it is a good idea to secure the rear wheel to just keep it from moving around and check them periodically, any can come loose.

This opinion is based on transporting about 1100 bikes as the crash truck at Portland International Raceway. Handlebars are not always an option!
 

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LIke Blinky said... soft ties... They are just pieces of strap looped at the ends. I make a bigger loop off my bars so the ratchet straps don't have to come any where near my bike.
 
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