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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
so before i left on a business trip i replaced both front and rear wheel bearings. everything went really smooth till i tried to seat the bearings at the base of the pocket. of course the first side went in easy enough but after flipping the rims and throwing in the spacers the second side gave me some issues. to be more specific the 2nd side found the spacer before the bearing seated which of course left the bearings bound from the pressure against the spacer. So here comes the question .

should the bearings be seated all the way in the pocket or left out a bit for the spacer to have just a bit of free play?

unfortuantely i didnt pay much attention to where the originals were sitting before they were removed and of course the book doesnt say anything about how to seat them.

any and all advice is welcome!
 

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The left side race should be seated in the wheel fully. You are supposed to put the left one in first, but I don't remember what difference that would make with the spacer. The left side does have a closer clearance to the spacer. Could you have the spacer up against the shoulder?
 

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Hi Keywork,
I understand what you are saying.

The manual say to install the left bearing FIRST. Reading between the lines I believe this to mean:

1. First install the left bearing and seat it completely.
2. Then install the right bearing, just up to the point where the spacer is pinched between the inner bearing races, but loose enough so that the bearings don't bind. If this leaves a gap, that's OK.

The service manual also calls out special tools for bearing removal as well as installation.

I used to just use a drift punch and a hammer to remove the bearings. For installation I would put the old bearing up against the new one to drive it in. This helps distribute the impact and also keep things square. Of course, never hit the inner race as it will damage the bearing.

I've never replaced wheel bearings on my SV, so I don't know if the special tools are really necessary, or just make life easier.

Good luck!
-TeeRiver

Edit: On closer inspection, the service manual actually does call out a clearance between the bearing race and the bearing pocket in the wheel. This confirms that you do need to leave a gap when you install the second bearing. See pg 7-13 (front wheel), and pg 7-47 (rear wheel).

Good catch by Veee in the following post: The left bearing goes in first on front wheel, and the right bearing goes in first on the rear wheel.

Uh oh Keywork, I think you may have a problem removing the new bearing without damaging it. Thou shalt not bang on the bearing's inner race! Perhaps the bearing removal tool could gently do the job?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well TeeRiver yours is the best ive got so far so if noone else comes about with anything different thats the way they are goin once i get home. only problem is beatin them back out just a bit to loosen up those bearings. ill probly just buy another set
 

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Has has been mentioned, the first bearing installed seats into the cup in the wheel, and then second bearing seats onto the spacer. This ensures the proper spacing between the bearings. Check your service manual to see which bearing needs to go in first.

Unless you really hammered on the bearing, there's no need to buy new ones. Just go ahead and tap it out slightly, and then reseat it properly against the spacer.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
so im guessing the proper setting is against it but still able to spin freely? other than that what yall are saying makes loads of sense in my tiny lil brain
 

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The left side bearing bottoms in the pocket. To get the right side bearing seated properly both the inner and outer race must be pressed on at the same time. The inner and outer race must be kept flush with each other. The inner race bears against the spacer, the outer race is supposed to be flush with the inner race. The best way to do that is to use a piece of stout metal that is big enough to bear on both races.

First gen manual page 6-6.
 

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The left side bearing bottoms in the pocket.
one more time. that is for front wheel.
rear you install right side bearing first.
notice OP is doing both wheels.
do you even know why left or right side depending on front or rear wheel has to go first?
 

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Oops! I came in late and didn't read that both wheels were being done.

Veee is correct, front wheel seat the left bearing first, rear wheel seat the right bearing first.
 

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The left side bearing bottoms in the pocket. To get the right side bearing seated properly both the inner and outer race must be pressed on at the same time. The inner and outer race must be kept flush with each other. The inner race bears against the spacer, the outer race is supposed to be flush with the inner race. The best way to do that is to use a piece of stout metal that is big enough to bear on both races.

First gen manual page 6-6.
To drive the new bearing I'll take the old one, place it on top of the new, and then wrap electrical tape around their edge. Then I'll use the old one to drive the new one, and as it seats in, it'll just push the electrical tape out of the way.
 

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Another way to drive bearings in is to use a piece of PVC. You can usually get a size close and then shave it down to be slight less on the OD than the outer race. This ensures you do not hit the inner race during installation. My $0.02 worth.
 
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