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I need to get a new torque wrench so that I can put my bike back together. Suggestions? If you use multiple ones, I'm interested in learning which.
 

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You can spend all kinds of money on one of these. If you're looking for inexpensive, the Harbor Freight one is surprisingly good. The Northern Tool one is not so good. For moderate price, the Sears Craftsman is pretty good.
 

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I use the Harbor Freight ones for my own personal use, but I lent one out and it came back unscrewed way too far, so I don't trust it any more. Then I spent the money on split beam torque wrenches by Precision Instruments that can't be unscrewed too far.
 

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After using a torque wrench for the first time on my oil drain plug and having a leak develop, I no longer use it for most applications where my "organic" torque arm after 43yrs of wrenching works just fine. When I need to tighten a high torque bolt, I use a Craftsman beam style torque wrench.
 

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After using a torque wrench for the first time on my oil drain plug and having a leak develop, I no longer use it for most applications where my "organic" torque arm after 43yrs of wrenching works just fine. When I need to tighten a high torque bolt, I use a Craftsman beam style torque wrench.
Bingo. For most people, on most fasteners, a torque wrench causes more harm than good.
Most stripped thread posts you see on the forums include the words, "in spite of using a torque wrench...". Generally the words "in spite of" should actually read "because of".
Clicker types are the worst, people just set them and pull without paying any attention to the feel of the threads. If the wrench is out of calibration, or the threads are fatigued, or more lubed than the spec assumes, or the spec is wrong*, you've got a problem.

*Yes, that can happen. Rear sprocket bolts on the SV for example. 43ft-lbs is way too much for that bolt, 25-30ft-lbs is plenty.
 

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So the conclusion is guessing IS better than using a good precision toque wrench that can be calibrated? :lmao:
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Most of the time, yes. Although it's not a guess, it's a combination of experience and feel.
The important thing is to understand what you're trying to accomplish when you're tightening a bolt. Torque, per se, is unimportant. What you're really doing is pre-stressing (or pre-loading, or pre-stretching) the fastener, both to keep it from coming loose and to prevent cycle fatigue. Torque is a convenient way approximating that amount of pre-stress. Two main problems with that. First, torque is only indirectly related to the linear stress level, the amount of friction in the system is variable and determines how much of that torque actually loads the threads. Second, the ideal pre-stress level is not a fixed number. It will change over time as the threads fatigue. Bolts that are commonly loosened and re-tightened, especially those that are aluminum, are most subject to this.

Another issue is that the torque wrench robs you of some feel, makes it harder to tell when you're approaching the yield point of the threads.

So you can see that an oil drain plug is absolutely the worst place to use a torque wrench. A lot of on/off cycles, highly lubed, aluminum case threads.

I very rarely use one, rod bolts, case stud nuts and very high torque fasteners (>100ft-lbs) are about it.
 

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So the conclusion is guessing IS better than using a good precision toque wrench that can be calibrated? :lmao:

No offence but If you over tighten the oil drain bolt enough, I guess eventually the leak will go away.....

I digress.
Why would l take offence? I don't know you and you certainly don't know how tight I made the drain bolt or how loose it was after using a precision tool.
 

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Most of the time, yes. Although it's not a guess, it's a combination of experience and feel.



I have a clicker type that i rarely use.

If you take a bolt out, you should know how much pressure to use to put it back in.

If you notice, the tool kit does not come with a torque wrench.
 

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For anything requiring more than 40ft/lbs, I've got my lovely SK (its engraved..) For low torque stuff, I've got a Harbor Freight sourced wrench. HF unit did a great job for my front rotors/brakes.

I've been using the SK for about 11 years now. I don't expect that out of my HF wrench, but the SK cost..a lot.. and the HF wrench was 20 bucks.

I'd like another SK and will eventually acquire one for the low range stuff.

I guess I should note, my torque wrenches only see use when I'm doing something where precision is required I'm working under a time limit. So to be fair... my Hunter Tools (oh yeah, old school) ratchet does about 90% of my torquing. Damn tough wrench.
 

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I have a clicker type that i rarely use.

If you take a bolt out, you should know how much pressure to use to put it back in.

If you notice, the tool kit does not come with a torque wrench.
Ever work on an old bike or one that lives near the ocean? Those will often have bolts that are a PITA to just break loose, really hard to get a feel for them during removal.
 

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Ever work on an old bike or one that lives near the ocean? Those will often have bolts that are a PITA to just break loose, really hard to get a feel for them during removal.


Yes, I have worked on old stuff.
i can tell the difference between stuck and tight.

YMMV.

:vroom:
 

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Don't know the exact model but I use a Snap-on 3/8 drive, 1-75 ftlbs, torque wrench.
 
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