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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I'm planning on taking a couple day trip on my new bike and have never ridden for more than a day. Besides the obvious like clothes what do you bring with you. Do you pack any tools, tire repair kit, etc?

Thank you,
Jason
 

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I'd most likely bring a tire plug kit, the sv tool kit (which you hopefully still have stashed in that lil box) chain lube (depending on the distance,) rain attire, phone charger, a map (just incase,) and protein bars are a good snack on the road ;)

Just a few ideas!
 

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Just doing that this evening. This will help me with my checklist.

I always have with me a Slime brand compact air compressor (their powersports model) and a gummy worm tire repair kit. They will fit in your trunk and you'll be happy to have them when you need them. I've used mine on the road, far from home, twice. Also, make sure the tool kit that comes with the sv is there (or pack the equivalent).

Unless I am very certain the weather will be warm and dry the entire time, I pack a rainsuit, rainproof overgloves, and rainproof overboots. A little bulky, but this all fits in a large tank bag or a tail bag. Invaluable when it rains, but also handy if the temperature drops. Wind chill is a b!tch. Similarly, if I think it might get chilly, I'll pack glove liners and a balaclava (and an extra pair of thinner athletic socks to double-up with). Those items pack up small, and keeping your extremities warm can make the difference between comfort and misery.

When traveling away from home (overnight or longer) I usually take along a gallon freezer bag filled with odds and ends, such as: zip ties of various lengths; spare headlight bulb; tube of Permatex Ultra Copper RTV gasket maker/sealant; tube of Super Glue; small roll of duct tape; small roll of double-sided foam tape; small roll of electrical tape; spare clutch and brake levers; Multitool; [pocket knife; compact allen key/socket/screw driver set; headlamp-style flashlight; small hand-held flashlight; blue Loctite; anti-seize; dielectric grease.

Make sure your chain is adjusted correctly, and that it is clean and well-lubed. It's a good idea to do this right before a long trip. If the trip is over 500 miles, I'll bring a small bottle or can of chain lube if I'm on the SV (the Guzzi is shaft drive), and lube the chain as needed. Make sure your oil is relatively clean and fresh, and that it's at the right level. Also check tire condition and air pressure; coolant condition and level; brake fluid condition and level; battery level and condition; and make sure the horn and all lights work.

I take both clear and dark tint shields for the helmet. (I have a bag for the extra shield.) Also, non-polarized sunglasses, reading glasses (if you need them) and some cleaner/defogger and a cleaning cloth for the shields and glasses. If I have room, a spare set of gloves, in case my primary pair get wet.

Also: cash; bank card; credit card; cell phone and charger; small first-aid kit; over-the counter pain relievers and antacids; chewing gum; energy bars or beef jerky; small bottle of water or camelback filled with water; emergency contact info.; motorcycle insurance card; motorcycle roadside assistance card; health insurance card; bike registration papers and driver's license. (Also check that the tag is on the bike -- don't laugh, one time in the middle of a 400-mile trip, I noticed I had left the tag at home. Make sure the registration is current, too.)

I'll probably think of a few other things as I pack this evening. If so, I'll try to post again.
 

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Just doing that this evening. This will help me with my checklist.

I always have with me a Slime brand compact air compressor (their powersports model) and a gummy worm tire repair kit. They will fit in your trunk and you'll be happy to have them when you need them. I've used mine on the road, far from home, twice. Also, make sure the tool kit that comes with the sv is there (or pack the equivalent).

Unless I am very certain the weather will be warm and dry the entire time, I pack a rainsuit, rainproof overgloves, and rainproof overboots. A little bulky, but this all fits in a large tank bag or a tail bag. Invaluable when it rains, but also handy if the temperature drops. Wind chill is a b!tch. Similarly, if I think it might get chilly, I'll pack glove liners and a balaclava (and an extra pair of thinner athletic socks to double-up with). Those items pack up small, and keeping your extremities warm can make the difference between comfort and misery.

When traveling away from home (overnight or longer) I usually take along a gallon freezer bag filled with odds and ends, such as: zip ties of various lengths; spare headlight bulb; tube of Permatex Ultra Copper RTV gasket maker/sealant; tube of Super Glue; small roll of duct tape; small roll of double-sided foam tape; small roll of electrical tape; spare clutch and brake levers; Multitool; [pocket knife; compact allen key/socket/screw driver set; headlamp-style flashlight; small hand-held flashlight.

Make sure your chain is adjusted correctly, and that it is clean and well-lubed. It's a good idea to do this right before a long trip. If the trip is over 500 miles, I'll bring a small bottle or can of chain lube if I'm on the SV (the Guzzi is shaft drive), and lube the chain as needed. Make sure your oil is relatively clean and fresh, and that it's at the right level. Also check air pressure and coolant level, and make sure the horn and all lights work.

I take both clear and dark tint shields for the helmet. (I have a bag for the extra shield.) Also, non-polarized sunglasses, reading glasses (if you need them) and some cleaner/defogger and a cleaning cloth for the shields and glasses. If I have room, a spare set of gloves, in case my primary pair get wet.

Also: cash; bank card; credit card; cell phone and charger; small first-aid kit; over-the counter pain relievers and antacids; chewing gum; energy bars or beef jerky; small bottle of water or camelback filled with water; emergency contact info.; motorcycle insurance card; motorcycle roadside assistance card; health insurance card; bike registration papers and driver's license. (Also check that the tag is on the bike -- don't laugh, one time in the middle of a 400-mile trip, I noticed I had left the tag at home. Make sure the registration is current, too.)

I'll probably think of a few other things as I pack this evening. If so, I'll try to post again.

You could take the easy route and just take cfreger with you... ;D
 

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I'd most likely bring a tire plug kit, the sv tool kit (which you hopefully still have stashed in that lil box) chain lube (depending on the distance,) rain attire, phone charger, a map (just incase,) and protein bars are a good snack on the road ;)

Just a few ideas!
Tire plug kit won't do much good if you don't have a way of putting air in the tires.

I keep one of these under the rear seat at all times (along with stuff for plugging): [ame]http://www.amazon.com/Slime-40001-Motorcycle-Tire-Inflator/dp/B000ET9SB4[/ame]
 

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Well, all packed, and I remembered one more thing: Bulb siphon. A few dollars at WalMart auto dept. Folds up small, and if you run out of gas....
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Wow, Thanks cfreger.

That was very helpful and extremely detailed. I'm thinking of doing around a 400 mile trip that would take me through curvy mountain roads and desert so I'll probably be looking into some clothing to keep warm. Also, going to check out the air pump you and opmike mentioned.

Hope you have a fun and safe trip.
 

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Nice... Any way to take a small reservoir of gas (like a reserve) in case you misjudge the distance to the next gas station?
There are a variety of small portable gas containers on the market -- some specifically designed for motorcycle travel.

Here are some examples:


http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/4/22/259/20367/ITEM/Kolpin-Fuel-Pack-Jr.aspx?SiteID=Google_PLA259&WT.mc_ID=10012&esvt=0-GOUSC&esvadt=9-0-3886819-1&esvaid=30548&zmam=88421133&zmas=1&zmac=45&zmap=192891&kw={keyword}&gclid=CNq6gYe1wrMCFWaoPAodDggAoA


http://www.asianiron.com/motorsports-merchandise/saddle-can


[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Reda-Portable-Motorcycle-Gas-Can/dp/B003WHBVDI[/ame]



http://www.buycheapr.com/us/result.jsp?ga=us18&q=msr+fuel+can

I would only carry gas in a container designed for that purpose. I would not carry gas in a tupperware container, glass jar, or other home-brewed solution.

However, unless I was traveling through a place or at a time when I knew that open gas pumps were few and far between, I would not bother to carry spare gas. I would rely on my bulb siphon, and, if I was traveling alone and could not flag down a good Samaritan to spare me some gas, I'd walk to a station or call roadside assistance.
 

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Wow, Thanks cfreger.

That was very helpful and extremely detailed. I'm thinking of doing around a 400 mile trip that would take me through curvy mountain roads and desert so I'll probably be looking into some clothing to keep warm. Also, going to check out the air pump you and opmike mentioned.

Hope you have a fun and safe trip.
Sounds like fun, but where are you going to go on the other 3 days?

;D

Don't overthink it. Basic tools, tire plugs and a manual pump, small first aid kit, and some clean underwear is all you need for a couple of days. Make sure you have cash if you are going to be out in the boonies, a lot of small shops and service stations don't take credit or debit cards.
 

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There are a variety of small portable gas containers on the market -- some specifically designed for motorcycle travel.

-SNIP-

I would only carry gas in a container designed for that purpose. I would not carry gas in a tupperware container, glass jar, or other home-brewed solution.

However, unless I was traveling through a place or at a time when I knew that open gas pumps were few and far between, I would not bother to carry spare gas. I would rely on my bulb siphon, and, if I was traveling alone and could not flag down a good Samaritan to spare me some gas, I'd walk to a station or call roadside assistance.

Note that most cars have a screen that prevents siphoning.
 
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