Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I replaced my sprockets and chain today.

I used a chain tool for the master link, and it seems that I pressed the link too hard. I had read somewhere else that you want the chain pin to extend one of the link plate's width beyond the face of the link. When I got it to be about that far, I rolled my chain by the front sprocket and it had a definite kink in it.

This is before I adjusted the slack out of the chain. After properly adjusting the slack, the kink went away at the front sprocket, but you can definitely see that the chain doesn't swivel as smoothly as the other links. For instance, there's a slight kink when the master link is in between the sprockets, where you measure the slack.

I figured since the chain is turning enough at the front sprocket, it'll probably loosen up with time so I riveted it anyway. Is that ok, or did I just ruin my chain? It's a DID 525, in case that matters.

TIA
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,058 Posts
Do you have a micrometer or any other way to measure the thickness of the master link compared to the other links? I think that is a safer way to measure then basing it off the thickness of the link.

If you only pressed the master link on too tight it shouldn't have been a problem to fix but if you pressed the rivet with it too tight then it will most likely stay too tight.

It won't be the end of the world to ride it with it kinking slightly. BUT, if it doesn't loosen up I would spend a few buck on a new master link and replace it before it causes any long term damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
I've done that a few times. I gently pry the side plate back out with 2 screwdrivers, one on each end of the side plate, making sure not to damage the O-rings.

The side plate is supposed to be pressed on far enough to almost make metal-to-metal contact with the inner links, but it looks to me like it definitely compresses the O-rings more than the pre-assembled links (I hope that sounds right...). If it is pressed on far enough to make metal-to-metal contact, that will prevent it from rotating until the metal surfaces wear a bit, the problem being that the worn metal bits are now trapped inside the inner bushings by the O-rings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys! I properly adjusted the chain and left it overnight. After reading your responses, I took a look this morning to see if I could get better pics.

I loosened the slack on the chain to show the kink like it was before. The good news is that I couldn't get the kink to happen at the front sprocket like it used to. When I first put the chain on yesterday, the kink at the sprocket was gnarly, but now it's gone. Here are some pics of what it currently looks like.

This shows the kink in the master link with a slack chain. Not 100% loose, but it's sagging pretty good:


Here's a closeup of the master link itself:


Here's a rear view of the O-rings. The master link is the first full link at the top of the pic, with all the white grease in it:


Here's the kink in the master link with proper slack. You can tell that it doesn't rotate as freely as the rest of the links. I was hoping that this will work itself loose, but not sure?


Also, do I need to lube the new chain, or is there enough already from the factory? The chain looks pretty greasy to me, but not sure if I should add more to it.

I'm ok if I get less life out of the chain for being a bonehead and overtightening it. I just hope it doesn't snap and take out my crank case like it almost did this time!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
If you go out for a ride and that think ticks and knocks... its too tight, the link that is.

EDIT: If it doesn't relax after about 20 miles... to be fair, mine was a tad tight at first too, but not like that. That just kinda gives me goose bumps.. LOL

But...

For the sake of caution, please redo that master link. Enough of us get taken out of the saddle each year by far less preventable reasons.

I'm not trying to be a d*ck, I'm just being practical. That baby looks preeettttyyyy tight. A snapping chain can amputate limbs, and if that chain is new... there's no point in risking life, limb, and SV over a part that costs a few buckets and takes less than 20 minutes to replace.

Honestly though, its your call. We just don't want to see someone get hurt needlessly.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,820 Posts
Replace it and use either a vernier caliper or a regular caliper to compare thickness with a normal link.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top