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Took it for a good ride out to Barber Motorsports Park and AL-25 (nice set of curves). In the process I scarred up my right boot toe slider and almost the whole right side of the bike (note to self, slow into unfamiliar hairpins ;) )
 

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Went out to tighten the chain and found out I don't have sockets big enough. Thought the set I bought with the torque wrench were good. Went for a ride instead.
 

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I've been reading about chain oilers lately. It's not unusual for people to get 40+K miles out of a chain with an automatic oiler. So, until I can make my mind up which one to get, I've been experimenting with a different (for me) way of lubing the chain.

I'm using 80/90wt gear oil and applying it with a toothbrush. I don't use a lot. After I've brushed all sides of the chain, I wipe it with a paper towel. The chain looks cleaner than when I used spray lube and it hasn't been any more messy than with spray lube, either.

I think that the thick and sticky spray chain lubes don't do as good of a job in keeping the o-rings wet as the gear oil. Time will tell how it works. I'm lubing the chain every 150 to 200 miles and it stays looking wet, which would seem to indicate that it's well lubed.

Saving the cost of a chain and sprocket set every year or two is a good thing. Money is about to get very, very tight for people as the economy slowly crumbles, so getting the most out of chains and tires is really important.
 

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Adjusted my TPS and my chain - and went for a 100-mile ride in the AWESOME sunny 70* weather. What a blast! That bike is hands down the best purchase I've made in my 45 years. After six years and over 20K miles, it still puts a big grin on my face EVERY time I get on it. I'm lovin' the new exhaust note from the Delkevic shorty.

My TPS was WAY out of adjustment - kicked in at 4000 RPMs instead of the 1450 it's supposed to. The adjustment made the bike significantly smoother at lower speeds/RPMs.
 

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I've been reading about chain oilers lately. It's not unusual for people to get 40+K miles out of a chain with an automatic oiler. So, until I can make my mind up which one to get, I've been experimenting with a different (for me) way of lubing the chain.

I'm using 80/90wt gear oil and applying it with a toothbrush. I don't use a lot. After I've brushed all sides of the chain, I wipe it with a paper towel. The chain looks cleaner than when I used spray lube and it hasn't been any more messy than with spray lube, either.

I think that the thick and sticky spray chain lubes don't do as good of a job in keeping the o-rings wet as the gear oil. Time will tell how it works. I'm lubing the chain every 150 to 200 miles and it stays looking wet, which would seem to indicate that it's well lubed.

Saving the cost of a chain and sprocket set every year or two is a good thing. Money is about to get very, very tight for people as the economy slowly crumbles, so getting the most out of chains and tires is really important.
I'm interested to know what type of riders and bikes have gotten 40k out of a chain. My guess is non-sport riders, probably touring type who rarely get on it hard so the chain doesn't stretch.
 

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o-ring chains are lubed internally so really the biggest factor in chain wear is keeping the dirt and grit off the chain that is really what eats away at it and the sprockets...

People are getting good results with that teflon lube that essentially is dry.. and as such it attracts little grit from the roads.

as long as you wipe down the chain with some lube after cleaning the bike and keep at it when you notice grit building up on the chain/sprockets you should be good...


What I do between bi-yearly major kerosene cleanings is to clean the chain with the chain lube... yeah it sounds weird but chain lube is pretty cheap and I not only clean the chain, I lube it at the same time..

I've found by applying a light spray all around the chain and wiping it down clean before it dries, and then applying a bit more afterwards, I not only clean it pretty well, but I lube it real good too... I do wipe away the excess to minimize fling though..

I may go through a can of lube a bit faster than someone who doesn't do it this way.. but my chain and sprocket look brand new.


I hate those auto oilers... more weight to the bike.. something that could potentially fail and spew oil near my tire.. and it is dumping oil all the time so the rim gets fling off all the time... no thanks..


I'll keep with my methods.... but may try that teflon chain lube if it ever becomes available in Canada


I've been reading about chain oilers lately. It's not unusual for people to get 40+K miles out of a chain with an automatic oiler. So, until I can make my mind up which one to get, I've been experimenting with a different (for me) way of lubing the chain.

I'm using 80/90wt gear oil and applying it with a toothbrush. I don't use a lot. After I've brushed all sides of the chain, I wipe it with a paper towel. The chain looks cleaner than when I used spray lube and it hasn't been any more messy than with spray lube, either.

I think that the thick and sticky spray chain lubes don't do as good of a job in keeping the o-rings wet as the gear oil. Time will tell how it works. I'm lubing the chain every 150 to 200 miles and it stays looking wet, which would seem to indicate that it's well lubed.

Saving the cost of a chain and sprocket set every year or two is a good thing. Money is about to get very, very tight for people as the economy slowly crumbles, so getting the most out of chains and tires is really important.
 

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I got 20K+ miles out of the original chain using Maxima Chain Wax and occasional kerosene cleanings - so I'm sticking with that.
 

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Had a maintenance Day here in the Victoria.Changed the brake fluid on mine.Did a TPS adjust on Greg's(silver 03).Devlin's (yellow 05)got allot done.Adjust bars and TPS,replace bake fluid and coolant.A nice afternoon with some fellow SVers:thumbsup:
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Devlin and Greg
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Yours truly.
O yeah I made them both gutter guard rad protectors:)
 

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I'm interested to know what type of riders and bikes have gotten 40k out of a chain. My guess is non-sport riders, probably touring type who rarely get on it hard so the chain doesn't stretch.
Chains don't actually "stretch"; that's an inaccurate term that is commonly used, but is decidedly incorrect.

Chains wear at each pivot point, so the sum of all the wear at the end of each link allows the entire chain to elongate. The side plates don't elongate, nothing stretches, it's the sum of the wear at each pivot.

Chains wear the same, regardless of type of usage. It's all wear on the pins and sleeves. No "stretch".

You can do some research on chain oilers and read the same things that I have. You are correct, most racers and racer wannabes are too cool to use chain oilers (surely not track legal, either), it's the commuters, touring types, practical types, the eccentric oddball and RandyO that gravitate towards long chain life. There are some stories about courier types in London who tested chain oilers (one of the bikes was an R1) and chain life doubled.

I commute through twisties daily, "hot rod" around and have a great time, but I'm not a racer, so a chain oiler might be the hot ticket for me. I don't have to worry about what other people might think or about having some stigma for using something out of the ordinary. There are very few motorcycles in my county; I'm the only "road bike dude" in my entire town! So I can be a total non-conformist. As usual.
 
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