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Flushed: engine oil, brake fluid, coolant.
Fitted on: Hamicad fender eliminator
Changed: spark plugs

And at first sight, I tought the bike had been layed down, there was decent scrapes on the frame, and a part of it had been repainted. I said to myself, hey, it was too good to be true....Then, I was like, where the hell are those manufacturer stickers? those on the dash and on the fr..a..me....****IT FU/$?!!!

I don't know wich of the 2 previous owner did this, but they removed the stickers with a knife.....

At least the bike wasn't layed down...
 

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601 Posts
Finished fork overhaul (Traxxion tubes, Emulators, .90 Sonic springs, 15wt oil) and re-installed on bike. Now to finish everything else :(
 

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Put on my Progrip, put on my windscreen which I painted black. Cleaned the chain, put chain wax on it. Then went for a 40 mile ride in 45 degree weather. Very cold...
 

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Finished programming the veypor and did a run to set the gear ratios for the gear indicator. Great computer. This was the first drive with the new jets. It dynoed at 67 HP. Not bad for a 1st gen. wheels up in first and second. I cant wait till its warm enough for the track!!!
 

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Safety wired my garage door opener remote button in place. The too small and stretched too tightly O-ring I had used apparently gave up the ghost at some point.
 

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Finished programming the veypor and did a run to set the gear ratios for the gear indicator. Great computer. This was the first drive with the new jets. It dynoed at 67 HP. Not bad for a 1st gen. wheels up in first and second. I cant wait till its warm enough for the track!!!
The vapor had GPI? Or are you talking about something else?
 

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4,837 Posts
I checked my chain alignment before I lubed it. This really opened a can of worms.

I've been using a straight edge pushed against the back sprocket and comparing it to the chain running to the front sprocket. Theoretically, if the rear wheel is straight, the straight edge should run exactly parallel to the chain. But, in using this technique, my last rear tire lasted a whopping 2750 miles and appeared to be worn more on the left side.

I set the alignment the way I have been and then did some measurements. I found that the right side of the axle was further back than on the left side. The marks on the swing arm verified that something was slightly screwed up, too.

To make a long story short, I'm taking measurements from the rear axle center to the swing arm pivot as well as from the groove in the axle plate that points to the swing arm marks to the end of the swing arm) to verify alignment and confirming the measurements with the swing arm marks.

It's frustrating to be a perfectionist on certain things like this and find that some things in theory don't work out in reality. It's the consensus of opinion here on SVR that the swing arm marks aren't to be trusted, but it looks to me like they are the easiest and most reliable way to confirm alignment.

I am wondering why the sprocket in front doesn't run in a straight line exactly to the back sprocket or why the method I used caused misalignment. It seems as if there is some offset, but that really doesn't make sense.

Any opinions out there?
 

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Got it out of storage, changed the oil, filter, and spark plugs. Also installed a new right side fairing (bought on ebay for $15! :eek:), since mine was broke around the turn signal. (previous owners fault :rolleyes:)
 

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Replaced spark plugs, changed oil and filter, washed bike, cleaned/lubed/adjusted chain.

@Rock Dodger - If the axle nut isn't fully to recommended torque, the rear sprocket/cush drive assembly may have enough 'slop' to give the appearance of misalignment when using the rear sprocket as an alignment plane for measurement. I doubt this is an issue, but worth mentioning. Try the front and rear wheel alignment trick using string, tape, and a precise ruler.

I checked my chain alignment before I lubed it. This really opened a can of worms.

I've been using a straight edge pushed against the back sprocket and comparing it to the chain running to the front sprocket. Theoretically, if the rear wheel is straight, the straight edge should run exactly parallel to the chain. But, in using this technique, my last rear tire lasted a whopping 2750 miles and appeared to be worn more on the left side.

I set the alignment the way I have been and then did some measurements. I found that the right side of the axle was further back than on the left side. The marks on the swing arm verified that something was slightly screwed up, too.

To make a long story short, I'm taking measurements from the rear axle center to the swing arm pivot as well as from the groove in the axle plate that points to the swing arm marks to the end of the swing arm) to verify alignment and confirming the measurements with the swing arm marks.

It's frustrating to be a perfectionist on certain things like this and find that some things in theory don't work out in reality. It's the consensus of opinion here on SVR that the swing arm marks aren't to be trusted, but it looks to me like they are the easiest and most reliable way to confirm alignment.

I am wondering why the sprocket in front doesn't run in a straight line exactly to the back sprocket or why the method I used caused misalignment. It seems as if there is some offset, but that really doesn't make sense.

Any opinions out there?
 

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Replaced spark plugs, changed oil and filter, washed bike, cleaned/lubed/adjusted chain.

@Rock Dodger - If the axle nut isn't fully to recommended torque, the rear sprocket/cush drive assembly may have enough 'slop' to give the appearance of misalignment when using the rear sprocket as an alignment plane for measurement. I doubt this is an issue, but worth mentioning. Try the front and rear wheel alignment trick using string, tape, and a precise ruler.
That's a good point. The sprocket carrier rests on one bearing and can flop around until it's torqued down. It would definitely give a bad reading if not fully tightened.

I tried re-checking the chain alignment method with the nut tightened and I still had some variation between that result and measuring.

I'll check out the link you noted. Thanks.
 

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Rear wheel alignment issues...

Any opinions out there?
I had someone tell me when I had my first and was struggling with the same thing that if the manufacture could design a four-valve overhead cam head that would safely allow the engine to rev to 1x,xxx rpm, don't you think they could get something as simple as some index marks right?
 
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