Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I completed the MSF class in Denver a few weeks ago and got my first bike. Due to car troubles I ended up commuting in traffic sooner then I planned. My confidence is improving though I'm finding myself leery of leaning while cornering, taking quick evasive maneuvers, and slowing quickly if a light turns red. I don't want to leave my skills development to trial and error. So what route do you recommend next? Other classes? Track days not focused racing?

I get the impression I need to learn stuff like this....

http://www.bestbeginnermotorcycles.com/forum/forum/2064/downshifting-prior-turns

I've run across these training possibilities in the Front Range area.

http://www.go4itservices.com/

http://chicanetrackdays.com/

Any suggestions?

Ridesyeti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Find a very large, empty parking lot where you can practice emergency stops from at least 40 mph. This will give you a little more feel for how much room it takes to stop the bike at speeds higher than MSF can allow. Be especially careful to learn how to make an emergency stop without locking up the brakes. Practice also your swerves and evasive maneuvers at increasingly higher speeds (still keeping it safe for a parking lot, though).

My opinion is that you're probably not ready for a track day until you've ridden for a year or so. Others may differ.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
51 Posts
Even experts got to brush up on their skills. Find a parking lot, try to get something that resembles cones and use them to do slaloms, emergency stops, turns, etc. The stuff you did at the MSF course. If you google it or still have your guides, you can basically set up the exact same obstacles.

I would say emergency braking is pretty **** important. You simply do not get to test this under normal riding conditions and do not want to leave it up to an emergency to have to rely on months old practice. Keep those emergency stop skills fresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,220 Posts
"try to get something that resembles cones"

Go to Wal-Mart and get their bag of a dozen tennis balls (something like $4) and cut them in half. Make great "cones" and won't throw you sideways if you hit one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Good thoughts. By track days I was thinking more along the lines of beginner cornering training and other training more advanced or at higher speeds then the MSF course. I was not thinking of pretending to race. For example, until I read about it, I was not aware that the rear wheel could loose traction if you down shift to too low a gear for the engine speed. I suspect I would learn better with actual instruction rather then simply reading.

Ridesyeti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,937 Posts
I was not aware that the rear wheel could loose traction if you down shift to too low a gear for the engine speed.
Why would this even be a surprise. You have to understand traction has a limit do you not? I mean what happens when you hit the brakes. Can you not hit them hard enough to cause skidding? Google the traction circle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
True. Not entirely surprising. I road cycle and mountain bike so, yes, I'm quite aware of the effect of braking. However, being new to motorized two wheeled vehicles I kinda figured the engine would "brake" a bit more progressively or softly such that traction wouldn't be so easy to loose. I guess I figured the engine would rev into the red zone more then traction would be lost if down shifting too much.

Ridesyeti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,276 Posts
True. Not entirely surprising. I road cycle and mountain bike so, yes, I'm quite aware of the effect of braking. However, being new to motorized two wheeled vehicles I kinda figured the engine would "brake" a bit more progressively or softly such that traction wouldn't be so easy to loose. I guess I figured the engine would rev into the red zone more then traction would be lost if down shifting too much.

Ridesyeti
Some bikes yes, but the Sv and most inline fours have way too much compression to over rev like that from a down shift...Something like a two-stroke or really old four stroke might be prone to over-rev from a down shift though.

I'll add a vote for the parking lot practice, it's a great way to practice manuevering at low-to-moderate speeds, at least one drop is nearly inevitable and thats usually how many times a beginner will fall...better to do it without a car behind you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
680 Posts
Good thoughts. By track days I was thinking more along the lines of beginner cornering training and other training more advanced or at higher speeds then the MSF course. I was not thinking of pretending to race. For example, until I read about it, I was not aware that the rear wheel could loose traction if you down shift to too low a gear for the engine speed. I suspect I would learn better with actual instruction rather then simply reading.

Ridesyeti
I understand what you're thinking. Only took the course and got my license a little over a year ago myself. It's just that a track day, even for novices, would be lost on you if you're not even comfortable leaning into corners yet. And a lot of more advanced rider training -- track day schools included -- won't accept you unless you've been riding for at least a year. I'm going to my first track day/rider school in a few weeks, and I know that I wouldn't have gotten nearly as much out of it if I had done it last year. You need to get down the basics in the parking lot and then get some experience with different situations on the street.

I'd also suggest doing some rides with more experienced riders, as long as they're not "squids" who will push you to ride beyond your boundaries. I learned a lot just riding in a group and getting a feel for how they took corners and at what speeds. It can be helpful, especially if they're aware you're a new rider and are willing to ride at slow to moderate speeds for your benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Go buy proficient motorcycling by David Hough. It'll cover a lot of what you learned in MSF in more detail. Keep practicing!
I second this. After I passed my Team Oregon class (Oregon's version of the MSF) I bought and read this book cover to cover. It helped out a lot when I got my bike a few weeks later.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
+1 to practicing stopping.

I did MSF but didn't practice any quick braking on my SV. Then one night on the way home I had to do a quick stop, locked up the rear, and dind't use nearly enough front. The next day I did some practicing, and now Every couple days Practice stopping quick when coming to a stop light (when I have no one behind me).

As for turns I Usually use a combo of Engine braking and brakes to get slowed down before the turn. I usually make turns onto side streets in 2nd.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Discussion Starter #13

·
site supporter
Joined
·
6,050 Posts
Experience is the only real teacher. Reading can be a helpful coach to prevent you from developing bad riding habits and to keep you supplied with information to help filter and understand what you experience from your butt, your head and your brain while you ride.

By riding is the only way to learn how to ride well.

Ride well and be happy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
54 Posts
Proficient motorcycling is a must....you should understand what makes the bike sit up and what keeps it stuck to the ground....different types of lines through turns and effective braking techniques. THIS BOOK IS EXCELLENT.

Secondly, there is a series of DVDs by some Florida motorcycle cop....."Ride Like a Pro"....I think #4 has exercises for the parking lot and tips on panic stops, evasive stuff, etc. Worth the money.

Then find a parking lot and work on the slow speed stuff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
I agree, need to experience what locking the rear tire and how to prevent that locking up, as for me friday morning it was 28 degrees outside. This light which normally has been consistent in knowing when it turns to red. This day though the light was a quick one for some reason I was going roughly 50 I was at the point of either stoping or just running it and so I decided to do a quick stop. Being cold and a bit frosty on the road my rear locked up on me and since I haven't practiced that before I know what it is like in a automobile where my break locks up constitently. I just applied that concept instinctively by pumping the breaks to unlock and reapply them to stop. I was pretty ex cited I managed to keep myself from having my rear spin out from underneath me. And I do know that I need to practice in the parking lot too. Just that weather has been bad and the few days that is nice I take advantage and ride to work.

As others mentioned above me, my MSF instructor would spend an hour before course started and would just practice the maneuvers.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top