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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As the title said, found a gas leak today while prepping to do an oil change on my track bike. Last time I rode it was about a month ago, and its been stored since.

I went to start it today to get the oil warmed up and left it to idle for about 2-3 minutes. Came back and noticed a puddle on the floor near where the oil is. Clear liquid smelled strongly of gas. I immediate shut off the engine and took a closer look ( and a video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tAbt_BggPKE&feature=youtube_gdata_player ).

To my untrained eyes, it seems like the gas is leaking from the head and dripping down ..

What do you guys think this mean ? Hoping its not time for a new motor.
 

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Hey, try this: lift your gas tank or take it down from the bike, and check the hose that connects to the fuel pump and the injectors. If you don't put it correctly it might lose some gas. I don't think it's a problem with your engine...just some loose connections. You can also replace that hose (wich is a plastic hose covered by a rubber shirt) with a gasoline hose, you can buy it from any car shop.
 

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It's almost always the fuel hose that connects the two throttle bodies on the right side of the bike. It eventually drips down to the left side since your bike is leaning to the left as it's idling. After a few minutes, the leak usually stops because the hose expands after enough fuel goes thru it, making the seal tighter. Usually only on cold starts does it leak.

The fuel hose in question is under the airbox, connected by two clamps that you cannot tighten. The common fix is to replace the factory clamps with screw on clamps you buy from Walmart or any other place.

Here is a good picture of it...



Here is my DIY procedure ....

1. Put bike on center stand (not vital, but makes things easier).

2. Remove seat side covers, seat, and lift tank, secure with tank stand (stored in trunk).

3. Remove air box cover (loosen 7 captive screws).

4. Remove air filter (place in safe clean place).

5. Disconnect misc. electrical connectors (2, one on each side), and misc. tubing (2 on left side, 1 on right side).

6. Unscrew sensor (located on the bottom back right side of airbox.

7. With philips screwdriver, unscrew the throttle body clamps for both throttle bodies, just under the airbox of each throttle body. Standard length screwdriver works fine.

8. Gently but firmly pull up the airbox to disconnect from throttle bodies. On some bikes, you still will have the P.A.I.R. hosing connected on the right side of the airbox, but it has plenty of slack, and you can just move the whole airbox behind the engine to give you access to the fuel lines.

9. Disconnect fuel line between the two throttle bodies. The OEM fuel line hose clamps are a b*tch to remove. Don’t bother with it, they are easy to move. Just simply pull the fuel line from one side out, and once out, removed the other side. Note: You will drop a little bit of fuel here.

10. Slide out the OEM hose clamps, and slide in new 5/8 screw type hose clamps. They cost about $2 at Walmart, Rileys, Autozone, Etc. for a pack.

11. Install the hose, position the clamps on each end, and tighten.

12. Reinstall everything in reverse order.

Note: But careful not to damage the fuel hose, it cost $45 at the dealer!
 

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I found a gas leak on my K6 recently. The fuel hose from the tank to the TB's was leaking quite a bit. I replaced it, as well as the line that links the TB's.

If you replace the short hose (shown above), it's a good idea to use hose rated for fuel injection. Also, use fuel injection clamps; they are solid (no perforations) and completely enclose the fuel line. The hose that you need it 5/16".
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey SD650S,

Great tutorial so far. Your instruction re: where the screws are located are right on point. I can tell you've done this before .. probably 100 times. LOL.

I'm taking pictures as I go to document the process as a DIY guide later on.

However right now I'm stuck on one of the connector in step 5 ( left side ).

Here's a pic of it. Is there a tab I need to press in to pull it off or do I need to twist it off or something else ?



Thanks again !
 

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Just push on the tab and pull down on the connection. The tab is on the front side.
+1

two fingers, squeeze the front (where your arrow is pointing) and back (facing towards the seat), then pull straight down.
 

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It's a lot easier to deal with the air box connections if you loosen it from the TB's first. After you loosen up the clamps, lift the air box up a little so you can pull the connectors and hoses loose. Same thing when putting it back together: make all of the connections, then fit the air box down on the TB's.

Edited to add: take the filter out of the air box. When you reassemble the air box to the TB's, you can check from inside the air box to help you line up the air box to the TB's. You can also double check the fit of the TB's to the air box. Make sure that there aren't any gaps between the air box and the TB's. You do this by feel. Check it again after you tighten the clamps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Update: got this done and it seemed to have fixed my problem.

Here's a few images for anyone attempting to do this.

First a shot of that green connector I had issue with. Turns out the tab on the back of mine was broken so that's why your suggestions didn't work.



For me, it ended up not being necessary to remove all those connectors. I simply needed to tilt the air box back to get access to that hose. I didn't need to disconnect the air box completely. I was able to get it tilted enough by loosening it from the TB ( only one small screw for each TB ) and disconnecting the two hoses on the left side below the airbox ( red arrow in pic below ).



Removing that fuel line really was a PITA, but putting it back in is worse. I had to nearly bend the line in half to squeeze it in. However with the 5/8" hose clamps in, the connection was much more secure. I couldn't slide the hose back / forth anymore.



Reversed the process to put the air box back on. Reconnected the hoses. Reattached the filter & air box. Started the bike back up. Voila no more leaks!

Only negative was it ran a bit rough in the first min or so, but then cleared up and sounded normal again. I assume it was because its just been sitting there for about two weeks.

So I think this solved my issue guys, thanks again for everyone's help!

PS. SD650S .. Your engine's gold parts looks a lot cleaner / better than mine !
 

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Great write up man, sorry I didn't answer your question earlier (forget this thread was still going on :) ), looks like you got it done anyways!

That's actually not my engine, it's a photo I found on Google, your engine looks way better than mine.

Update: got this done and it seemed to have fixed my problem.

Here's a few images for anyone attempting to do this.

First a shot of that green connector I had issue with. Turns out the tab on the back of mine was broken so that's why your suggestions didn't work.



For me, it ended up not being necessary to remove all those connectors. I simply needed to tilt the air box back to get access to that hose. I didn't need to disconnect the air box completely. I was able to get it tilted enough by loosening it from the TB ( only one small screw for each TB ) and disconnecting the two hoses on the left side below the airbox ( red arrow in pic below ).



Removing that fuel line really was a PITA, but putting it back in is worse. I had to nearly bend the line in half to squeeze it in. However with the 5/8" hose clamps in, the connection was much more secure. I couldn't slide the hose back / forth anymore.



Reversed the process to put the air box back on. Reconnected the hoses. Reattached the filter & air box. Started the bike back up. Voila no more leaks!

Only negative was it ran a bit rough in the first min or so, but then cleared up and sounded normal again. I assume it was because its just been sitting there for about two weeks.

So I think this solved my issue guys, thanks again for everyone's help!

PS. SD650S .. Your engine's gold parts looks a lot cleaner / better than mine !
 

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I know this isn't the most recent thread, but I had this same issue and fixed it last week using these instructions. Just wanted to say, thank you!
 

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Last night I was idling before a ride and I discovered this type of leak on my 2k7n. Pretty scary - I rode for a few minutes and then visited a parking lot and it seemed to have gone away. I am not proficient personally, but I'll give this fix a go. I don't think I want to drive the local mechanic for a fix like this... but if I start to get out of my element I'll probably give them a call and have them dig in there - it would cost a lot more but they can probably get it done a whole lot quicker than I could.
 
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