Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike has just passed 25000 km and according to the manual it's time for a valve check/adjustment. I'm wondering if this is really necessary or is it just a way to keep the shops busy. What's your experience with this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
I went 1K miles beyond the recommendation when I had my 1gen SV. I needed to adjust one valve. Some have gone many miles beyond the spec and didn't need to adjust. It's not too difficult to check the valves yourself. You may not need to adjust. Download a service manual and check out the procedure. Become one with your ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
184 Posts
Mine was checked at 30k and nothing needed.. I’m now at 55. still haven't checked.

if you want to check your self. it's not that hard.. seat off.. tank off 4 bolts in valve covers (all gaskets are reusable) roll motor slide gauge between cam and bucket.. always check the minimum! the majority of the time this is where the issues are. as long as they aer somewhere between the two limits.. your fine.. if there out.. you need to remove the cams remove the buckets and change the shim.. the job is not that hard but more precise measurement are needed for spacing so you know what shim you need to replace the existing shim with.. don't mix any parts! keep track of what came from what spot.. they look the same but there not 100% the same.

Odds are you won't need to go there
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,269 Posts
I put mine off until about 26k miles, my tech says I should come see him at about 42k miles because ONE exhaust valve will likely have come to its minimum spec.. That said, I had them checked because I had a problem that needed chasing down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,558 Posts
I'm in the same boat as everyone else, checked mine for the first time at around 40,000km last year. One exhaust shim on the rear head was swapped, it was still in spec but on the tight end.

Checked again last month at 75,000km.. all still in spec.

If you're doing it yourself, it's worth the piece of mind to check the clearances. And since it's unlikely you'll have to adjust them... now's a good time to learn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,455 Posts
I say its worth it. It shouldn't be expensive at all to have them checked. If they have to adjusted it will be a little pricey.

Nothing is better than a little piece of mind. Some bikes the valves never move, so bike they do quite a bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,290 Posts
Solid lifter valves need periodic adjustment of the valve lash. This is news to you?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
What's your experience with this?
there are many recommended routine service intervals, most if ignored will only result in a sh!tty running engine that will be fixed the moment you do the recommended service

valve lash inspection is NOT the same. its the one routine service that if not done, could actually result in serious damage to the engine

valves too tight do not close all the way, hot gasses burn away at the valve seats and stem, possibly weakening the stem to the point it snaps and goes flying thru the top of the piston

my experience, yes, I have had an engine swallow a valve more than once, on a 66 Honda S90 and a cage 69 VW Beetle, the bike also resulted in the rod going thru the cylinder wall, totally destroyed the engine
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,833 Posts
I'm just the opposite and felt the need to check mine at 1200 miles...basically the first week I had it. Ended up adjusting them all as one was too tight, three were borderline and the others in the middle. Set them all to maximums and the idle picked up 300 rpms! Also blew the TB synch off badly...but once adjusted the engine was smoother at idle and pulled much better down low and in the midrange. Having the valves adjusted properly is critical for proper engine performance. If you are wondering if you should check them...you should. You'll thank yourself afterwards.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Checking is not a difficult DIY job. Adjusting is much more complex. Checked mine at 24,000kms, 48,000kms, and just last week at 66,000kms. All still in spec, but a few are getting close to their limit on the tight side. The job is much easier with the rad and gas tank removed, but it's not absolutely necessary to remove them in order to check the valves. It makes for a good opportunity to drain, flush, and replace your coolant; at 25k, it's likely due for a change anyway.

Chances are your valves will be fine, but better to check and know than to wait for something to go wrong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
This is a reminder for me to check mine. I'm at 19,000 miles and still haven't checked them. I've known for awhile that I need to do this, but time has been at a premium lately. I'll likely do it weekend after next, after my exam, so I'll have some breathing room.

I was happy to see that the SV shims are the same as my Ninja 250, so I can use my Hot Cams shim kit I already have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all the replies.
I guess I'd better stop procrastinting and check things out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
Thanks for all the replies.
I guess I'd better stop procrastinting and check things out.
Thanks for starting this thread. It got me to stop procastinating as well. I just ordered the new valve gaskets (for just in case; it shouldn't actually be needed) this morning, and plan to check them in the next couple weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
Just a note for those of you who will do this when it's cold out:
Due to the very close tolerances in the tenths of millimeters, having a cold engine and cold feeler gauge can actually throw the reading off by a 'unit;' the next gauge size up. Same holds true when you have an icy cold engine but a warm feeler gauge (such as from being in your hand), it can make the gap read narrower than it actually is.

I have three sets of feeler gauges, one from craftsman, snap-on, and.. unknown. I usually get the same gap reading from the craftsman and snap-on feelers, but the unknown one is always off.

Just some food for thought for those of you that have valves that are very close to a min tolerance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
I'm at the point of needing to do this as well. I'm debating whether to do it myself or have the dealer handle it. I was told at the service counter that it's about a 3 hour job X $85 shop rate -- so probably $255 job. I asked if that is just to check tolerances or if that was if they needed to be shimmed? He said once they are in there it isn't much more to actually shim them so it's about the same cost either way.

I've never done it myself. Does $255 sound out of line? I think I feel pretty comfortable checking clearances myself but I'm a little confused by what I've read on actually shimming them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
905 Posts
There really isn't any reason to pay someone to just check the shims. Replacing them I can understand, but it's very simple to just check them.
For someone unfamiliar with what they're doing and going very slow, I can see it taking three or four hours easily. For a shop however, I'd expect them to be able to do it in under two hours.
It's also a much longer job to replace the shims since the camshafts need to come out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
There really isn't any reason to pay someone to just check the shims. Replacing them I can understand, but it's very simple to just check them.
For someone unfamiliar with what they're doing and going very slow, I can see it taking three or four hours easily. For a shop however, I'd expect them to be able to do it in under two hours.
It's also a much longer job to replace the shims since the camshafts need to come out.
I thought 3 hrs sounded like a lot just to check them...but seemed reasonable if they actually had to replace them. I dunno. The guy at the counter was even having trouble finding it in his flat shop rate book...so I still question whether he gave me an accurate quote for labor time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,617 Posts
I'm at the point of needing to do this as well. I'm debating whether to do it myself or have the dealer handle it. I was told at the service counter that it's about a 3 hour job X $85 shop rate -- so probably $255 job. I asked if that is just to check tolerances or if that was if they needed to be shimmed? He said once they are in there it isn't much more to actually shim them so it's about the same cost either way.

I've never done it myself. Does $255 sound out of line? I think I feel pretty comfortable checking clearances myself but I'm a little confused by what I've read on actually shimming them.
I've never taken a bike to a shop, so I don't know about the prices.

However, the part about it not being much more work to adjust them is completely incorrect. Checking them is easy. Just set the cylinder to TDC and insert feeler gauges. Easy peasy. However, to adjust them, you've got to take off the camshaft and then replace the shims under the tappets (under-the-bucket shims). Then you've got to put it back together and do the timing and such. It sounds much easier saying it than it is actually doing it.

Hmmmm... Now that I think about it, does the first gen have under-the-bucket shims? If not, then it may not be much more difficult than just checking them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
I think I'll call another local dealer to see if I get the same labor quote of 3 hrs just for the valve clearance check.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top