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I have the SV650 now and i've done all the suspension/spring work, and it's a great bike.

I was wondering what your opinion on was about moving up to the Sv1k because I have an opportunity to get a good deal on it.

Who has moved on the the 1k and is it worth it?

Thanks
 

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For me I wasn't looking to get a 1K, but oddly enough this is the bike a got for my car. I do like it more on freeways and I like having that extra power, but if you've already done all the suspension mods I'd say stick with the 650. It's lighter, better on gas and cheaper on insurance.
 

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Get the SV1000. If you want more power all the suspension mods in the world wont mean jack until you have more power. If I would have found the SV1000 (when I had my SV650) for decent price I would have traded up in a heartbeat.


DOO ITTT!!! If you can swap the suspension mods to the SV1000 even better.
 

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I guess it depends on whether or not you want to sacrifice handling for power.

Personally, I'm not really a huge fan of the SV1k and wouldn't really consider it much of an upgrade. It's a nice budget bike for a liter twin street bike, but I think there are better options out there in that class.
 

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The only way I'd do it is if it had ABS and was naked. Copper would be good too. I dunno if that's even possible from the factory, but yeah, I'd definitely consider that an upgrade from my bike. :)
 

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I went from a cruiser to a Bandit 1200, to a sv650 to a sv1000s.
My two favorite bikes were the Bandit and the 650. Both had big pluses and some
small negatives. But it comes down to riding style and what attributes the bike has that you like best.

I settled for the sv1000s since it is a good mix of all the other bikes,
Good hiway and rolllon like the Bandit, light and more modern like the sv650 (05)with FI. and decent brakes and looks too.
 

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I was really grateful to see this thread, even though the subject has probably been addressed repeatedly on this site. If y'all don't mind, could we keep rolling with this?

I love my sv650n. But I like the idea of a little more power and more stability (particularly on the highway). I've been thinking the sv1000s might be the answer.
 

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Just for the sake of keeping it going for the last request.

A nice little write up I found to keep you entertained.

Frames
The strength of every motorcycle is the frame. The dimensions of both bikes are extremely similar, but the SV650 uses a pressure-cast aluminum alloy truss frame, while the larger SV1000 is built on a high-vacuum die-casting technology frame.


Engines
At the heart of each bike is a version of Suzuki's V-twin engine. The SV650 has a liquid-cooled 645-cubic-centimeter (cc) 90-degree V-twin engine with 8 valves. The SV1000 has a big-bore short stroke 996cc 90-degree V-twin engine with dual-throttle valve technology.





Suspension
The SV1000's firm suspension is sourced directly from the GSXR600 sport bike. The fully adjustable stout front forks have 4.7 inches of travel, compared to the nimble 5.1 inches of travel from the SV650's 41mm damping rod front fork system. Both bikes use a fully adjustable rear shock, but the SV1000 uses a piggyback-reservoir shock while the SV650 has a link-type single shock.


Brakes
Stopping the SV650 are dual 290mm floating front disc brakes and a single 240mm rear disc brake. The SV1000 brakes are larger both in the front and back, with twin 310mm disc brakes.


Fuel Consumption
Drawing fuel out of its 4.7-gallon gas tank, the 996cc V-twin averages 41-city/54-highway miles per gallon. The total fuel consumption range is 193-city/253-highway miles per tank. The smaller 645cc V-twin's 4.5-gallon gas tank averages 45-city/59-highway miles per gallon. Its total fuel consumption is 203-city/266-highway miles per tank.


Tires
Being a slightly larger bike overall, the SV1000 has a 120/70-ZR17 front tire and a 180/55-ZR17 rear tire. Going tubeless, the SV650 has a 120/60-ZR17 MC front tire and a 160/60-ZR17 MC rear tire.


Dry Weight
Weighing in, the 2003 SV650 and SV650S bikes had a dry weight of 364 pounds. But in 2009, when the SV650 model was dropped by Suzuki for the SFV650 Gladius, its dry weight had increased from 82 pounds to 446 pounds. At 408 pounds, the 2003 SV1000's dry weight was merely 44 pounds heavier than the smaller SV650. However, by 2006, the SV1000SZ European model had a dry weight of 412 pounds, decreasing the overall curb weight.


Speed
Turning the throttle and comparing the SV650 stats to the SV1000, the smaller bike loses in every category except 0-to-60 mph. Contributing to the dominance is the SV1000's top speed of 160 mph. On a quarter-mile track, it clocks 10.95 seconds at 125.8 mph. Going 0-to 60 mph, the SV1000 clocks 3.53 seconds. But increase the distance to 0-to-100 mph and the bigger bike turns in a time of 5.63 seconds.

On the flip side, the SV650 has an overall top speed of 135 mph. On a quarter-mile track, it travels the distance in 11.82 seconds at 106.02 mph. When measured going 0-to-60 mph, it registers a time of 3.65 seconds. Increasing the distance does not help the SV650's time. Traveling from 0-to-100 mph, the smaller bike registers 9.94 seconds.


Performance Parts
One major difference in favor of the SV650 is the hundreds of aftermarket parts available to change its appearance and boost its performance. Plus, after 2007, all SV650 bikes had the option to receive an anti-lock braking system (ABS), which the SV1000 never offered.
 

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The 1k has the same 4.5 gallon tank as the 650.

As Ive chimed in before, 1k is not an upgraded 650 its a different bike with the strengths previously mentioned in the thread. Power/stability trade off for more weight/ less flickability. Rarely do I need to rev above 6k (90mph GPS). It is more work to move around in the tight stuff (can still do it well enough though).
 

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If I lose 44 lbs, that would be like having a 650 with a 1K stuffed in it, better brakes, a better suspension and stereo sound to boot.
 

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Fuel Consumption
Drawing fuel out of its 4.7-gallon gas tank, the 996cc V-twin averages 41-city/54-highway miles per gallon. The total fuel consumption range is 193-city/253-highway miles per tank. The smaller 645cc V-twin's 4.5-gallon gas tank averages 45-city/59-highway miles per gallon. Its total fuel consumption is 203-city/266-highway miles per tank.
I'm not sure this is all that accurate either. With my old 2005 SV1000S, I consistently averaged about a 120-130 mile range on a full tank of gas.
 

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I'm not sure this is all that accurate either. With my old 2005 SV1000S, I consistently averaged about a 120-130 mile range on a full tank of gas.
+1 i fill up every 100 miles and so does my friend on his sv1ks
 

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+1 i fill up every 100 miles and so does my friend on his sv1ks
+2, I average 110-115 but that's still with one gallon left in the tank. Also includes getting on it every now and again(rev's up to 10-12K RPM).
I calculated 38.5 MPG on my last tank of gas. Going to keep doing this for a little while to see if that number changes.

If you got budget to play and have your heart set on a 1000 then go for it. I don't regret purchasing mine(I was back and forth between the 650 and 1000 for a very long time).

If you are just looking for more power, you have a few more options than trying to be loyal to the SV name.
 

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ineedanap - if you were trying to keep things accurate, you didn't. If the SV1K front suspension isn't based off a GSXR600, then what was it based on? I don't know what the front suspension is based on, but would like clarification.
 

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I had a 2006 SV650N that I purchased new. I traded it off for a 2003 SV1000N, and like the 1K much better. Sometimes bigger is better. Sometimes it isn't. A lot of it depends on what you are looking for in a bike and how you will use it.
 
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