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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
does anyone make a turbo kit for SV's?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
well that answers that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thats what I'm reading from other websites. I always have some idea floating around my head about mods, I just figured I'd ask. Most other sites are saying if the SV is pushed much higher than 700CC or 85 HP the motor won't take the strain. I saw somewhere that if a high compression piston swap was done it might make it more feasible, but the SV motor isn't the ideal motor for power upgrades much outside of exhaust and PC's.
 

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Thats what I'm reading from other websites. I always have some idea floating around my head about mods, I just figured I'd ask. Most other sites are saying if the SV is pushed much higher than 700CC or 85 HP the motor won't take the strain. I saw somewhere that if a high compression piston swap was done it might make it more feasible, but the SV motor isn't the ideal motor for power upgrades much outside of exhaust and PC's.
There are racers that pump the SV650 to over 100 rwhp, but, from what I've been told, they are prone to overheating on the street at that level of performance.
 

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Rumor has it the crank won't take much more then the 85hp you mentioned, but then again rumor has it that these bikes blow up as soon as the front wheel is lofted, so who knows. I have never felt the need for more power, so I never really thought about it.
 

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I saw somewhere that if a high compression piston swap was done it might make it more feasible, but the SV motor isn't the ideal motor for power upgrades much outside of exhaust and PC's.
Lower compression and forged internals are best for lots of boost.

BTW, I saw Lucas Oil Nationals Tractor Pulls - announcer claimed they ran 100 lbs. of boost!!!
 

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Power coming from a turbocharged application is much less hard on an engine than naturally aspirated power. For example, if the SV can at all handle 100HP from various engine mods including higher compression and greater bore, just turbocharging to get to the 100HP peak will last far longer.

Crank is the only thing it seems we have to worry about. Unfortunately, it's a huge worry.
 

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Really? I have been told (by a mechanic, not just some dude) that turbo/super charging is rather hard on motors. I believe he said he has seen piston rings blown, along with gaskets and a slew of other parts. Now, this could all be from people using too large of turbo running too much boost, not really sure the circumstances.
 

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I can't speak for the SV engines, but in most other applications turbocharging is easier on the engine than over-building one N/A. For high power N/A engines, alot of work is needed to the entire engine. Higher compression, larger bore/stroke, head porting, larger valves, studded heads, matching flow into and out of the engine as well as high octane fuel. Alot of stress is added to the connecting rods crank shaft in either set-up, but if your target is to get 100whp(a fairly large stretch) then the turbo seems easiest. It will require some head work, stronger pistons(lower compression to support boost pressures) and rods, studded heads, better fuel and fine tuning on a dyno. Neither setup will prove as tractable as stock though. With forced induction, expect to, at best see shortened life of rings and probably head gasket and rod bearing failures over time. Same with an N/A engine pushed to simular extremes though the big problem there will be rod bearings, wrist pins, valves ect.
 

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If you want that kind of power ... go buy the gran-daddy of the SV and get yourself a TLR.
 

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If you install turbo on an engine that was NOT built for turbo use it will decrease reliability.
Turbo engines may not need to rev high but they put a great deal of stress on the crank and they produce a great deak of heat.Thay also need more maintenance,proper cooling(eg turbo timer ) and lot of other stuff.
Keep in mind that a bikes engine is anyway exposed to enviromental hardships.A turbocharged bike will be even more delicate.
 

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If you install turbo on an engine that was NOT built for turbo use it will decrease reliability.
Turbo engines may not need to rev high but they put a great deal of stress on the crank and they produce a great deak of heat.Thay also need more maintenance,proper cooling(eg turbo timer ) and lot of other stuff.
Keep in mind that a bikes engine is anyway exposed to enviromental hardships.A turbocharged bike will be even more delicate.
hmm, after installing several turbos/superchargers on engines, i have to call bs here. i am also an auto tech by trade, so i work on cars everyday. the weirdest car i have ever put a turbo on was a 1st gen tiburon and i rebuild the engine for a stage 3 turbo setup. his factory engine was blown and he wanted 400hp. the most important thing for a turbo engine to last is to have a good supply of cold air. hot air forced into an engine is not good. good fuel supply is another thing that is needed. also you dont have to lower the compression ratio for a turbo setup, but you have to have a really good intercooler to keep air temps down if you dont. if you really want to get into a discussion about what is needed for an engine to last with a turbo, we will need to go back to the start and explain what it does. on a side note the ford powerstroke has 18.5 to 1 compression and its factory turbo. the ford IDI turbo engine (before the powerstroke) has 21.5 to 1 compression.
 

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hmm, after installing several turbos/superchargers on engines, i have to call bs here. i am also an auto tech by trade, so i work on cars everyday. the weirdest car i have ever put a turbo on was a 1st gen tiburon and i rebuild the engine for a stage 3 turbo setup. his factory engine was blown and he wanted 400hp. the most important thing for a turbo engine to last is to have a good supply of cold air. hot air forced into an engine is not good. good fuel supply is another thing that is needed. also you dont have to lower the compression ratio for a turbo setup, but you have to have a really good intercooler to keep air temps down if you dont. if you really want to get into a discussion about what is needed for an engine to last with a turbo, we will need to go back to the start and explain what it does. on a side note the ford powerstroke has 18.5 to 1 compression and its factory turbo. the ford IDI turbo engine (before the powerstroke) has 21.5 to 1 compression.
It is not only the compression ratio(of course you lower it for turbo applications) but also the "median compression"(i can't translate it from Greek properly) that is higher on turbo engines because of the forced induction.
Of course you can have reliable turbo applications but if the cost is waaayy bigger then you are in fact making the motor from scratch.Better buy a faster car!
When it comes to engine building in Greece we use the term "river".
River signals the limits that gives good balance between:
a)not very frequent maintenance and/or rebuilding
b)not very dependent on top quality fuel which you can't always find on the street(some guys sell fuel mixed with water!!)
c)not depending on solutionsvery depending on the driver's memory(eg water spraying(Aquamist kit) to keep temperatures down:you can't spray all day long on a long summer excursion in Greece...You may just forget filling or find yourself somewhere with no water)
d)not excessive oil consumption and mechanical noises caused by bigger tolerances when using forged pistons for example

If you cross the river then the car will be really demanding and costly.
I agree that everything can be done but one has to sort out his priorities.

eg VW suggests using 100RON fuel for Golf 2.0lt GT turbo.
This is practically impossible to find everywhere(I am talking about quality fuel).

There is a guy on a greek moto forum that has turbocharged an Afrika Twin 750!
The bike kicks ar*e!When we asked him if it is worth it he said NO.
He is an excellent mechanic himself and did all the stydying,modifying.Someone with no mechanical knowledge shouldn't do the same to his everyday bike.
 
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