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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about buying a track-only bike and am wondering if this auction for a trailer looks any good:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FREE...iewItemQQcategoryZ6755QQitemZ4611337643QQrdZ1

Anybody have any thoughts? Will that design allow me to tie down the bike adequately? He also has a model he sells with 8" wheels for a few bucks less - would that make much difference? I expect to use the trailer to tow the bike on freeways (75 mph) up to a few hundred miles away...I don't want to kill any wheel bearings, but also don't want to waste money on the 12" wheels if I don't need them.

thanks.
 

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12" wheels are not a waste of money...stay away from 8" wheels, IMO.
 

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I just bought that trailer. It comes in a kit from Harbor Freight. I paid 229 for the kit. It took about 6 hours to assemble then another 6 hours and almost $100 to put a 3/4" plywood deck on it, primed and painted. I spent another $50 to have it registered and get the Texas plates.

Keep in mind that the trailer is bolted together, not welded. Also, the axle is open sided box tube with solid round 1 foot long pieces welded to each side to form an axle for the wheels. I didn't mind this considering it was $300 cheaper than anything else I found.

I haven't used mine yet but donnieJ has one and gave it pretty good reviews.
 

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Looks like the famous Harbor Freight trailer to me.  Same one as mine as well as many other riders.  Get the 12" wheels.
Works well.  I've towed from San Diego to Laguna Seca and regularly tow at 80mph with the M3.  Trailer handles really well in the turns. ;D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
cool, thanks for the responses. Harbor Freight has a store not too far from me, so I may go check out the trailer (looks like it's $249 right now). I may also just go with u-haul trailers for the time being, but it's good to know this is a reasonable option and won't cost me $1000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
oh, for you guys who have this trailer, how did you set it up to tow the bike? Just buy wheel chocks and screw them to the plywood deck? Were the frame rails sufficient to use as tie-down points?
 

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beni said:
oh, for you guys who have this trailer, how did you set it up to tow the bike?  Just buy wheel chocks and screw them to the plywood deck?  Were the frame rails sufficient to use as tie-down points?
I haven't tested it yet but I am just using a wheel chock and after confirming with others, decided to just bolt it to the plywood. For tie down points, I bought eyelet bolts the same size as the ones used to assemble the trailer. I substituted a few of the bolts that would have been used to secure the wood to the frame with the eyelets. So the eyelet bolts go through the wood and the frame. I used a nut and washer both above and below the deck. I didn't want to use the framerails as they are c shaped box tube and the hooks on my straps didn't fit onto them very well. Also, I thought the hook put too much pressure over a small area of the metal.
 

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I used eyebolts at the top two corners through the frame, and then two near the back through the plywood.  I had to make them offset so it still fold properly.  I also use a removeable wheel chock I think from LP.  I hooked up a little chain to hold it together while folded.  Then when I use the trailer it doubles as a bike ramp "safety chain".
A few pics HERE
 

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i have the same trailer. some advice:

1. buy the 12" wheels. besides a smoother rider, the larger the diameter, the less the wheel is spinning at a given speed - i.e. less wheel bearing wear.

2. buy bearing-buddies. these keep the grease in the hub and keep water out.

3. use pressure treated plywood for the deck. just have a 4x8 sheet cut exactly in half.

4. when installing the wheel chock, just as an extra safety measure try to position the chock so that the bolt actually goes through the plywood AND one of the cross-members.

5. when positioning the wheel chock, assuming you're setting the trailer up for one bike, hook the trailer up to the tow vehicle, roll the bike onto the trailer, then slowly roll it forward until it starts putting weight on the hitch. mark the spot a couple of inches forward and install the chock there, keeping in mind #4, above. once you do this you should be able to pick up the front of the trailer off the hitch by yourself and roll it around.

6. when you buy the trailer at harbor freight, pick up a cheap electric impact wrench, unless you already have a compressor and pneumatic gun. trust me on this. this will shave a lot of time off your assembly.

7. almost forgot, the bearings look like they come greased, but they are pretty much just coated with cheap grease. clean the grease off the bearings, and pack them using high quality wheel bearing grease. to do this grab a palmful of grease in one hand, take the bearing in the other hand and start "hitting" the wad of grease with the outer edge of the bearing until the grease starts to come out the other side. keep doing this as you turn the bearing until you have it packed with grease. then put some grease inside the hub before installing. of course this assumes you don't have a wheel bearing grease packer. when installing the bearings, tighten the castle nut with channel locks to make sure the hub is seated. then back the nut off around a quarter turn before installing the cotter pin.

good luck.
 

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2002r6 said:
5. when positioning the wheel chock, assuming you're setting the trailer up for one bike, hook the trailer up to the tow vehicle, roll the bike onto the trailer, then slowly roll it forward until it starts putting weight on the hitch.  mark the spot a couple of inches forward and install the chock there, keeping in mind #4, above.  once you do this you should be able to pick up the front of the trailer off the hitch by yourself and roll it around.

6. when you buy the trailer at harbor freight, pick up a cheap electric impact wrench, unless you already have a compressor and pneumatic gun.  trust me on this.  this will shave a lot of time off your assembly.
Good idea w/ #5.  I didn't do that but I got lucky with positioning because I can still wheel the bike around on the trailer by hand.
And YES use an impact wrench or something.  I for some reason didn't use mine and it was a PITA using sockets and wrenches.
 

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Where were you guys last week when I was building mine. Oh well, now I know.
 

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yes definatly the 12" wheels i towed from florida to Loudon, NH with 8" and had 2 blow outs. Once i got there i basically left the old trailer on the side of the road and bought a new one with 12" wheels. Result.......no more blow outs because the bigger diameter wheel produces less heat in the tire.
 

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+1 on the Harbor Frreight trailer with the 12" wheels. I have had one for three years now, put thousands of miles on it, and it works great. No problems. Plus if you are tight on space it folds up and does not take up much room in the garage. The low deck height is great too. Good advice given above, use pressure treated lumber, etc...
Lately I have kept mine outside and it is starting to turn pink. :p
 

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Unless you want to replaced the deck DO NOT USE Pressure Treated Plywood. It will dry out and crack. If you want to use a good plywood use "Advantech" It is plywood that is actually treated so it will not absorb water. I think its the same price as PT if not maybe cheaper? For proof I used to framed houses and we used this stuff. After a large rain we had to go into the framed houses and rill holes on the floor to let out the water. I also have a professor in college who threw a piece of in a a pond for a month. I didnt swell even a 32nd of an inch.


If you are going to use Eyelets to tie the bike down do the following. Put pieces of 2x4 down between the frame rails so that the eyelets arent just going through the plywood. Its a lot a easier to hit a 2x4 then a frame raile and a lot easier to drill through. Hey my 2 cents from years of framing, a civil engineer, and a project manager as a construction company.
 
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