Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all! I was just wondering what you guys use to torque your nuts. I've been looking at torque wrenches but they seem a little expensive. I know that correct torque values are crucial to a point and was wondering what is a decent price range for a torque wrench, given you use one? And if not, what do you use? Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,108 Posts
I have a couple of older Craftsman micrometer/clicker types but I have heard that the newer Craftsman clickers are junk. With the clickers, you set it and crank until it clicks, very convenient, but you need to make sure it is always stored at zero or you can mess up the calibration and it is easy to forget to do that. You may need at least two since the ranges are typically narrower than the beam types, but that makes it easier to get intermediate values compared to the lines on a beam wrench scale.

You can buy a Craftsman old-school beam type 0-150 ft lbs for $25 (or around $12 if on sale). They are certainly accurate enough for motorcycle maintenance and practically indestructible and virtually never go out of calibration. Not as convenient as a clicker type because you have to be able to read the scale and crank at the same time. If a fastener is under the bike, you may need to use a mirror. A piece of masking tape on the scale with a pencil mark at the desired torque value also makes it easier. You also need to hold the hand grip properly, no big deal once you get the hang of it. http://www.sears.com/craftsman-1-2-...p-00903300000P?prdNo=5&blockNo=5&blockType=G5

There are other types of torque wrenches. I haven't used it, but this one got a good review on Web Bike World a few years ago and seems to be the best of both worlds but is considerably more expensive (will not cover the low end of the torque settings you need, so another will also be necessary):

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/Precision-Instruments-PREC2FR100F-Torque-Wrench/dp/B000KL59LY/ref=sr_1_3?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1341654254&sr=1-3[/ame]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,823 Posts
http://www.motorcycle-superstore.co...ble-Torque-Wrench.aspx?WT.ac=RichAutoComplete

I've got a couple of the above in 3/8 and 1/2 which cover pretty much every bolt/nut on the bike. You can spend more or less....but I find these about OK for most stuff. If they've been laying around unused for a while (which is about every time they're used) it is good to start clicking them from a low torque value up to what you want to tighten as the ball joint seems to get sticky from sitting. Once its broken loose and clicking freely they are pretty accurate as compared to an old beam wrench for comparison...just don't crank up a high value and go at the bolt or they might over-tighten it. Nothing at all wrong with the old simple beam wrenches except they're less convenient to use some places.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
I have used the micrometer style ones from Harbor Freight. They're about $10 each.

As stated above, you just have to remember to return them to their lowest setting before storing and be careful not to unscrew the handle too much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,834 Posts
I have used the micrometer style ones from Harbor Freight. They're about $10 each.

As stated above, you just have to remember to return them to their lowest setting before storing and be careful not to unscrew the handle too much.
My Harbor Freight torque wrenches, they are cheap, but so far been reliable and accurate.
+1

Harbor Freight FTW.

I have two to cover a wide range of torque specs. A big 1/2 inch drive for the higher torque nuts & bolts, and a smaller 3/8 drive for the lower spec bolts (like the fork caps).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
I used the $25 ebay variety when rebuilding my engine. The only problem you'll run into is the torque on bolts less that 10 ft-lbs.
I destroyed on of my oil plate bolts because the torque wrench had too much leverage on the tiny bolt. the wrench didn't click (or i didn't hear/feel the click). I had to replace the oil plate bolts with some from autozone. I have since been told that for 7-10lbs...to just put the bolt in to the point of refusal by hand and then just snug it up 1/8-1/4 turn of a wrench. I'm no professional mechanic, but the motor has been through 550 miles since the rebuild and hasn't fallen apart or exploded yet. And since I know how much you all love picture... this is what a TOO MUCH looks like:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
I don't trust torque wrenches near the limits of their range. A 20-100 ft-lb torque wrench is really good for like, 30-90 ft-lbs, IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,823 Posts
I'd never seen one of those! So, after some investigation, it looks like that just holds a wrench so you can use your torque wrench with it. You'd need to adjust the torque value according to the additional leverage arm you are creating with its' use. Might be handy if you can't get a socket on a fastener...like the cylinder base nuts. Use a box wrench with this gizmo and your torque wrench.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Lots of good information guys, thanks! I just got a 1/2" torque wrench from harbor tools with a coupon for $12. I'll keep looking for a 3/8, though I feel like I don't need a proper wrench for this and can just use intuition when using a normal wrench. Thanks again! I have the Haynes manual to help me with the rest =]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Lots of good information guys, thanks! I just got a 1/2" torque wrench from harbor tools with a coupon for $12. I'll keep looking for a 3/8, though I feel like I don't need a proper wrench for this and can just use intuition when using a normal wrench. Thanks again! I have the Haynes manual to help me with the rest =]
If you are working on your motorcycle, do not use the 1/2 clicker, it is not going to be accurate at the ranges you will need. They are great for car tire lugs. On a motorcycle the rear axle nut is about what is it good for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,823 Posts
If you are working on your motorcycle, do not use the 1/2 clicker, it is not going to be accurate at the ranges you will need. They are great for car tire lugs. On a motorcycle the rear axle nut is about what is it good for.
Yea, the rear axle and a couple things on the engine that need 80-100ft/lbs are what I use the 1/2" on....everything else is 3/8", or less. Nice to have a wrench that will work down to 8 ft lbs for those little bolts if you can find one.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,108 Posts
Just use crowfoot wrenches.
Possible that crowfeet may not be long enough to reach some fasteners that are tucked away? This one seems more flexible but you have to apply adjusted values in either case and that might be harder to calculate with this one compared to fixed-length crowfeet.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top