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So I got my frame sliders/swingarms from motosliders today...but SADLY I don't own any freaking tools...WTF... So this made me come to the conclusion that I need to invest in tools....

I want like a small toolbox, nothing too big, but that has a good variety of tools. I know I can go and check them myself and buy the one that I think I'll used the most or need. but...It's always good to ask for and advice. I don't really care about the brand (think all are reliable). Any suggestions on what kind of toolbox/bag should I get (if you own any you'd like to recommend) please do so.... Thank you
 

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So I got my frame sliders/swingarms from motosliders today...but SADLY I don't own any freaking tools...WTF... So this made me come to the conclusion that I need to invest in tools....

I want like a small toolbox, nothing too big, but that has a good variety of tools. I know I can go and check them myself and buy the one that I think I'll used the most or need. but...It's always good to ask for and advice. I don't really care about the brand (think all are reliable). Any suggestions on what kind of toolbox/bag should I get (if you own any you'd like to recommend) please do so.... Thank you
Head down to sears or something... find a decent socket set with combo metric/imperial some brand that is good quality and have a lifetime warranty is a good idea...

An allan key set is good to have as well

then get a good plier set.. bent nose, needle nose, cutters, slip joint or vise grips

and a screw driver set or at least a decent screwdriver with a magnetic swapable bit end

a dremel with flexible head attachment is another good one...

and a torque wrench is another nice to have tool... in fact I'd probably say if you work on vehicles it is a must have...

after that you can pick up secure torx bits as you need them.. other sockets as you need them

other than the case the tools come in, you could get a craftsman tool box to hold a lot of it...

a soldering iron is another one that is a nice to have...


Basically if you get one of those Big Craftsman tool kits that include most of the above, you're good.... after that just add stuff as you need it..

I've tried cheap tools and they are crap... just get the stuff with the good warranty and you shouldn't have problem with them turning to sh!t on you

other brands may work as well.. I just chose craftsman because it is available almost anywhere (canada and usa) and they generally have a good long warranty... if others do the same... then try them too...

Something like this would be a good start... and I am sure you could get something similar for a lot less.. but it has most stuff you'd need...

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00941206000P?vName=Tools&cName=Hand+Tools%2C+General+Purpose&sName=Mechanics+Tool+Sets
 

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+1

But on the topic of sockets and motosliders, make sure you get metric sockets up to 19mm. Most sets I've seen usually top out around 17.

Also, get a good torque wrench (~20-40 dollars).
 

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+1

But on the topic of sockets and motosliders, make sure you get metric sockets up to 19mm. Most sets I've seen usually top out around 17.

Also, get a good torque wrench (~20-40 dollars).
If you have a good socket set, you can always pick up additions to the set for $2-$10 generally I added a 19 and the closest non metric equivalent when I got my motosliders... I think it cost me $10 bor both of them and they work with my current socket set..

It's handy if you have a tool chest to put the extra tools in though...

This link is probably most useful to start out with... it seems to have almost everything you'd need in one set...

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00987627000P?vName=Tools&cName=Hand+Tools%2C+General+Purpose&sName=Mechanics+Tool+Sets

After that it'd be fairly cheap to add bits and pieces as you need... both around the house and in the garage... just add a dremel and a soldering gun and maybe a few sockets here and there and you're good

Or you could go with this kind of thing and add the tools around the house to it..
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00983049000P?vName=Tools&cName=Hand+Tools%2C+General+Purpose&sName=Mechanics+Tool+Sets
 

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Wow...thanks for the info....really helpful...and yeah actually I was looking at this set...

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00935154000P?vName=Tools&cName=Mechanics+Tools&sName=Mechanics+Tool+Sets

100 bucks seems pretty good and has lots of tools...Ima go check it out tomorrow at the store.

That would be a good socket set with a few extras but it doesn't have a lot besides that... you really need a decent pliers set... and a screwdriver set as well... I guess you could add to this too... or if you already have tools..

my pliers are comming in very handy... but they cost me about $35 it just depends on what you need...

I find I need a lot more than just sockets... they are a part but not everything... Pliers and screwdriver bits (which that socket looks like it sort of has) are really needed...

a hack saw is also good to have... which a lot of times is included in those bigger sets...


If you get a good set that have a lifetime warranty... they may cost a bit more now... but you won't have to replace them... and they don't screw up on you... there is nothing worse than a socket wrench that dies on you right in the middle of something and your knuckles crash into hot or hard metal.... a good set is worth the extra cost now
 

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If you get a good set that have a lifetime warranty... they may cost a bit more now... but you won't have to replace them... and they don't screw up on you... there is nothing worse than a socket wrench that dies on you right in the middle of something and your knuckles crash into hot or hard metal.... a good set is worth the extra cost now
+1,000,000

I always thought people were making it up. Until one day I was changing an axle and went through like 4 sockets.

That was also the day I bought a compressor and an impact gun.
 

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if your not i a hurry watch sear website they have some good clearance/sale tool sets every now and then. try to look at the ones around $160-$200 they give you a pretty good veriety of tools that will get you through just about anything.

something like this is a good start and it comes in a case so you save on a tool box
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00934260000P?adCell=A3

i picked up a set of these after i got my bike since it has allot of hex bolts and they work great
http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00910308000P

if you think you will be expanding you tool set in the future they also sell modular tool sets that you can start basic and and modules in the future so that you don't have to get individule tools or end up with a bunch of duplicate tools.

allot of pros will swear by mac or snap on but for a home user like me the craftman tools are more then good enough and they have a great warranty on the hand tools. I've only broke 1 or 2 but i took them in and they replaced it no questions asked.
 

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I use quarter inch drive to do the majority of the work on my bike.

I use half inch drive for the "heavy" stuff like axles, sprocket nuts and such.

Get a good T-handle allen wrench set.

Remember that the bolts you work on are steel and for the most part, they fasten on to aluminum ... galling and stripping threads is a reality. (main reason why I use 1/4 drive)

Torque wrench is a neccessity, they are cheap if you get the beam and needle type. Sure they don't click but you can always see if they are calibrated, if not, bend the needle.

Blue and green loctite are your friend, it can't hurt, can only help.

But most important of all, buy the factory service manual.

The difference between a rider and a biker is that a biker works on their own bike.
 

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First off, +1 for Craftsman tools. And watch what you buy at Sears. My understanding is that only the Craftsman tools have the lifetime warranty, even though Sears also markets some other stuff.

Next, I have to laugh. You want only a small box of tools? There is no such thing! Once you start wrenching on your own bike, you start buying tools. Once you start buying tools, you have inescapeably begun an addicition. Every new task you go to do on your bike, you will discover you need a new tool. In very short time your 'small' tool box won't suffice. We did a few rounds of that before buying our first Sears two-tier rolling cabinet. Now, I'm beginning to think we need a second one. :angry1:

I say, admit the disease right off, and buy a big enough tool box to fill over the next few years, because the tools will keep on coming! :nana:
 

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+1 to pretty much everything Zokambaa said

I started off with that same $100 socket set you linked to and I kept it in my truck at all times. I added some larger sockets, more hex keys, a full pliers set, some new screwdrivers, a 90 degree screwdriver set, and a torque wrench. That's just what I carry at all times in my truck.

Also after breaking many a tool, I really agree with everyone on getting Craftsman. The other brand I've had a lot of success with is Kobalt from Lowes. I abuse their tools and have yet to have one fail on me.
 

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+1 on craftsman, but watch for sales. you can normally buy craftsman tools for 30-50% off if you wait a couple weeks for what you want to go on sale.
 

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Craftsman is my #1 tool company because of the lifetime warranty and that no matter where you are @, if there is a sears store there and has a replacement in stock, then you can just exchange and get on your way.
Go Craftsman, you'll never regret it!
One last rule to always remember, it's ok to borrow or rent a tool once, but if you have to borrow or rent it again, then you need to buy one permanently for your collection.
:D
 

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i have mostly craftsman tools and most are generally good quality. the ratchets have come down in quality over the years though. the ratchet bodies are good, but the ratchet gears su(k big time.
 

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yeah I noticed that on some craftsman tools now are being made in china... I'd be willing to bet that is part of why the quality has suffered... but who cares as long as they still keep their lifetime warranty... eventually they will choose the manufacturer who gives them the best quality for the price when they have to factor in replacement costs...

There are other brands out there with lifetime warranties as well, so they would be another good bet...

and yeah I agree... tools go on sale at various times... so if you can hold out till Father's day you'll probably get some killer deals then...

or find some shops who are going under due to the economy... I don't think craftsman cares where you take it if they fail and you need a replacement...



Oh I should also mention.. if shipping is not too bad, you could buy from shops in Canada... since the canadian dollar is only 77 cents US now... that is almost a 25% savings if shipping isn't crazy... tools are heavy so it may not be as good unless you live near the border (I'd say cali to canada is a bit of a drive though)
 

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I also like the craftsman tools, but when i was looking for tools I was on a budget and found a real cheap set at costco. I'm no wrencher, but for all my needs it's pretty much OK. I can't remember how cheap it was, but it's worth it to just take a look and grab a hot dog and soda for $1.50. Quality wise they are not craftsman, but for my needs they have never failed.
 

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i'd go for anything craftsman, snap-on, or mac. everything else is junk in my opinion.

if you can, i'd buy them used, you will save a ton of money and will be able to get more tools down the road. new stuff is very expensive, especially chests and boxes. could find a smaller 4 or 5 drawer one for probably around $50 on craigslist or something i bet. once you fill up your box, you know it is time to get another one/upgrade.

make sure to get deep 6 point sockets, with some extensions too. i use my 1/4 ratchet more than my 3/8. some gear wrenches are pretty nice too, i have the gearwrench brand and they come with lifetime warranty - got them at sears.
 

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+1,000,000

I always thought people were making it up. Until one day I was changing an axle and went through like 4 sockets.

That was also the day I bought a compressor and an impact gun.

I found that out the hard way I thought generally tools were tools for the most part... so I had a cheapie chinese ratchet set... and the first time I went to change the oil in my car it was a real b!tch to get the drain nut out (some monkey at the s t e a l e r s h i p {what the hell [email protected]$h!p is a swear?} used an power wrench on high torque or something) so I had to reeeeeeef on it... way more than I should have needed... anyway the ratcheting system in the wrench slipped and my knuckles went slamming right into the underbody of the car... and not the nice pannel part.. a folded steel corner part.... I probably could have used a couple stitches but butterfly bandages and superglue did the trick ;D

after that I got a good wrench... the nuts are more or less OK unless I am using them on slightly rounded bolts as they are soft and slip... but I replace the bad parts as I need them... but it is night and day if you get a good set...

I still have some of that cheap socket set left and you can compare a 3/8 socket from them and a 3/8 from craftsman... the craftsman sits nice and tight on the head of the bolt I am using it on... the cheapie wobbles a bit and is not quite as snug... and I've rarely ever used that size in the cheapie set either... You do get what you pay for
 

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I have a good craftsman socket set, but don't believe those are as useful as my set of combo wrenches when it comes to working on the bike. Too often I can't get my ratchet into position and go back to the combo. Now of course you'll need the socket to put on the motosliders but if you're just looking to get yourself started I'd start with metric combination wrenches, pliers and allen keys. The more you work on the bike and other things you'll want a second set of combo wrenches (get six-pointers,) and then a pair of US wrenches. I've collected other things as I need them, but frankly I still borrow torque wrenches and breaker bars from friends on the rare occasions I need them.
+1 on buying craftsman or some other quality brand with a warranty. Check the Sears ads. Snap on tools make me drool but probably aren't necessary for you.
 
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