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Discussion Starter #1
What have you done to cover up the grey/silver frame, footpegs, brake, shifter, etc?

I can't find any carbon fiber covers and I can't afford to buy all new parts... So I'm considering have them powdercoated.

Who has found carbon fiber parts, covers or other options?


 

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I have Powder coated most of that (rearsets, pass. foot pegs/brackets and brake/clutch levers) and i still need to do the engine covers, should be next weekend cause i'll be changing the oil then, but the sprocket cover is gonna get sprayed with semi-flat black rustoleum

and yes i said i powdercoated it, got a craftsman powder coating gun off eBay for like $35 and it works awesome. there are some on eBay now for $85-99 same exact thing, also some for bid at $20ish check this one the ones that say brand new will most likely have a defective canister lock, seems like someone put too much super glue when assembling them, there are tons of them that have broken or stuck locking switches but the gun is still 100% functional
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I have Powder coated most of that (rearsets, pass. foot pegs/brackets and brake/clutch levers) and i still need to do the engine covers,
Sounds like something I should look into. Do you know what you're getting into for the engine covers? I have no idea. I'm so far from mechanical it's stupid. I would think you have to protect the back side of them from the powder coating so they fit when you reinstall... What about taking the covers off? Any tips there?

Would you post some pics and tips when you're done? Got any pictures yet?

Thanks,

Rob.
 

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I recently trim blacked my rearsets, both sets of foot pegs/brackets and brake/clutch levers as well as all of the corresponding nuts and bolts. I don't have any pics since I just did this.

I thought of powdercoating, but have had problems in the past with parts not fitting exactly because of the thickness. I am not sure how well it will hold up since it is not powdercoated, but I took some precautions so it would be alittle better then a scuff and shoot. I bead blasted all of the parts and my friend that is a painter, used an epoxy primer sealer to shoot them first before I painted them.

Hopefully it will hold up well. Next is the forks and possibly the engine covers etc..

Glad to hear the home powdercoating works good
 

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I would think you have to protect the back side of them from the powder coating so they fit when you reinstall... What about taking the covers off? Any tips there?
First thats why i'm waiting till next weekend, when i will be changing my oil, so i am gonna drain all the oil first. And i will deffinitely tape off the back of the cases so they don't get the PC on them

I will try to take pics as i go through the process, if i remember i often plan on taking pics and get so into the work i forget but i'll try to remember. Here are some pics from the other parts i did

them hangin in my oven right after they cured

some of the pieces i did after the PC
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Those look fantastic. I thought they might look a little "home made" (no offense) but they look great. Every time I've painted, it's been a little blotchy. Can't wait to see the results of your next project.
 

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I just recently started polishing all my grey parts, the problem is that the castings are terrible and need lots of sanding before polish, the parts look a lot like chrome when done which is cool but id rather have a brushed finish anyways i think im going black powder or try to find someone to adonize them
 

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Harbor freight sells a cheap powder coat gun also. Transfer efficiency is pretty bad, but it does work. Along with 'HotCoat' powders from Eastwood Co (car restoration mail order house in PA) and an old toaster oven, you can get some pretty nice finishes. You should only cure powdercoat in a well ventilated area (do NOT cure powder coat in the kitchen), it could leave some nasty residues in the oven.
 

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Harbor freight sells a cheap powder coat gun also. Transfer efficiency is pretty bad, but it does work. Along with 'HotCoat' powders from Eastwood Co (car restoration mail order house in PA) and an old toaster oven, you can get some pretty nice finishes. You should only cure powdercoat in a well ventilated area (do NOT cure powder coat in the kitchen), it could leave some nasty residues in the oven.
do those guns require external air source? thats the nice thing about the craftsman one, no ext. air source needed. and some chemicals never hurt anyone ;)
 

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Yes, you'll need an air compressor with some kind of tank. I'm only running the gun around 35psi, and it doesn't require many CFM, but I run it through an air filter to dry it a bit as well. It's very easy to get professional results, and the powders are really inexpensive for the 8 oz jars. One of my spring projects will be trying to find a mix that's a close match to the odd metallic charcoal on the 2006 frame.
 

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I just stopped by a local powder shop and checked out some of the work. Have stripped and polished most of my parts and plan on going with a tinted translucent powder since no-one seems to anodize which would have been sweet. $185 for everthing - levers, passenger pegs and brackets etc...
 

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So i powder coated my engine covers today, but due to my slow memory early in the morning i thought the water pump cover was covered by the fairing(its not) so i didn't coat it :( so next oil change i'll have to do that. i have some pics of the process and i will try to get some pics of the bike tomorrow, only have one bike pic but it was 10 at night with my cell lol

Engine covers off


bottoms masked off to keep powder out of the inside



the outside masking on the one cover


hanging in the oven cooling


engine covers after PC


before


After
 

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Looks Great! Thanks for the update.

Might be the next mod on my list....

I always wanted to see what a full fairing SV looked like in white..very nice.

Do you have any pics before the black was added to the fairings?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I'm diggin it. Looks great! Can't wait to do this.

On another note. I contacted the guys at lawstCaws about their frame plugs to cover the bolt holes to get a completely blacked out look and they said they would consider making them for an SV if there was enough demand but no plans right now. None of their other frame plugs will fit the SV.

It's gonna take us buggin them about it to get some unlesss someone knows of another way.
 

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Do you have any pics before the black was added to the fairings?
it was never all white, actually the lower fairings were silver before paint, and then i painted the top part and bottom part white then sprayed the middle, so it wasn't ever full white. Sorry.
 

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So i powder coated my engine covers today, but due to my slow memory early in the morning i thought the water pump cover was covered by the fairing(its not) so i didn't coat it :( so next oil change i'll have to do that. i have some pics of the process and i will try to get some pics of the bike tomorrow, only have one bike pic but it was 10 at night with my cell lol(SNIP)

the outside masking on the one cover


hanging in the oven cooling


(SNIP)
Looks good - but...

One of the most important parts of coating is the surface prep. Even a strong coating like powder needs a solid surface to adhere to. You won't get the benefits of powder without it.

Usually complete stripping of the original coating with media blasting is your best choice, followed by a chemical conversion coat, then powder. Applying powder to a shiny surface doesn't give it enough to hang onto. Sanding to dull the original finish is a minimum of prep required.

Precise temp control is also important, as is proper time-at-temp.


Jay
 
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