Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I checked the valve clearances at about 18k miles, and several of them were out of spec. But I was intimidated by the whole adjustment process, so I kept putting it off. Well, this weekend I finally sucked it up and tore into the bike. I have over 21k miles on it now. I am a procrastinator.

I read the service manual and the bluepoof writeup (http://www.bluepoof.com/motorcycles/howto/svs_valves/index.htm) to get me in the mood. Then I started the disassembly. It all went pretty smooth until I got to those stupid cam chain tensioners (CCT). The service manual was useless: "Remove the intake or exhaust camshafts (3-21, 3-23)" Then on 3-21, "Remove the cam chain tension adjuster."

Yeah, right. The service manual assumes the engine is off the bike and sitting on a nice clean workbench. I wasn't about to pull the whole motor out. I looked to bluepoof for the rear CCT, and I did get one good tip to remove the right foot peg assembly, that made it easier. But she assumes the front cylinder is a piece of cake and whines about how difficult the rear is. Let me tell you, the front CCT is much more difficult to get to, in my opinion.

I got the rear CCT off with no problems. To try to avoid messing up the timing, I did one cam at a time, and just rolled it off the journal to expose the buckets, used a magnetic pointer to lift it out and pulled the shims out. Well, that was easy.

Then on to the front cylinder. First I couldn't figure out how to get to the CCT at all. There is a frame cross member directly over top of it. I cut down a 5mm allen key and put it in a 5mm socket and tried that, but as soon as I backed out the bolt a little, the top of the socket got wedged on the frame. Maybe a ball end allen key would do it, but I don't have any of those. So after pondering what to do, I took a step back and thought about why this CCT needed to come off. It is just to put some slack in the cam chain so you can get the cams off. I knew there was a screw inside the CCT that you turn to retract a plunger. So I thought screw it, I am leaving the CCT on the engine. I took a small screwdriver, and had to grind the tip down a little further to get it to work at an angle (the frame cross member was in the way). Then I retracted the plunger, left the screwdriver in and put a pair of vice grips on the screwdriver. This kept the slack in the chain, and I proceeded to change the shims. Nice and easy.

Front CCT: This is from the top, I removed the airbox to get to it. You can see how tight it is down there.


Here are the vice grips holding the screwdriver:


Here is the screwdriver in the CCT holding the plunger out:


Here is how I rolled the cams out of the way to get to the buckets.


Here is my very organized and clean notes as to the existing clearances, tappet sizes, and my math to determine which tappets I needed:


I did mess up the timing putting the rear cylinder cams back on, so I consulted the service manual to get the timing correct, and the instructions are pretty good. I had no problems with that.

While installing the rear CCT back on, with both my arms way up inside the nether-regions of the bike, I realized that I could have used the same trick on the rear, with the screwdriver and clamp. It would have been much easier. But I got everything back together, and now the valves are in spec. And I didn't have to pay some bozo at the stealership $80 an hour. They charged me $10 to switch out my tappets with the sizes I needed.

The whole job took like 6 or 7 hours, but I also flushed and replaced the coolant while I was at it, and changed the oil after I was done. I am really glad to have that job behind me!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
****, thanks for the tips! What are the recommended valve check intervals? Can't be worse than my 500 (every 4k miles!?!) but at least I don't have to remove cams for that one. It's shim-over-bucket, so just rotate the crankshaft so the cam is pointing up, push the bucket down, and lift the shim out with a magnet. Sounds like it's not that easy with the SV :(
 

· Registered
Joined
·
284 Posts
A couple of tips:

1) Mark your sprockets and cam chains with whiteout prior to loosening anything. This gives you a reference to go back to when reinstalling the cams.

2) If you replace the 1st gen cct with second gen the install, if you actually take them out, is MUCH easier. The second gen cct's don't require constant tension on the plunger to keep them retracted.

3) If you use 2 6" extensions on a ratchet, with a ball end allen socket, you can quite easily remove the cct's.

I check my clearances after every 2 race weekends. Even if I need to swap a couple of shims it takes me less than 2 hrs.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
****, thanks for the tips! What are the recommended valve check intervals? Can't be worse than my 500 (every 4k miles!?!) but at least I don't have to remove cams for that one. It's shim-over-bucket, so just rotate the crankshaft so the cam is pointing up, push the bucket down, and lift the shim out with a magnet. Sounds like it's not that easy with the SV :(
Every 15k miles is the recommended inspection interval. Checking the clearance is fairly easy. These are shim UNDER buckets, so you have to remove the cams to lift the buckets out.

steadyeddie said:
A couple of tips:

1) Mark your sprockets and cam chains with whiteout prior to loosening anything. This gives you a reference to go back to when reinstalling the cams.

2) If you replace the 1st gen cct with second gen the install, if you actually take them out, is MUCH easier. The second gen cct's don't require constant tension on the plunger to keep them retracted.

3) If you use 2 6" extensions on a ratchet, with a ball end allen socket, you can quite easily remove the cct's.

I check my clearances after every 2 race weekends. Even if I need to swap a couple of shims it takes me less than 2 hrs.
I did mark the cam and chain with a black sharpie, and it did make thinks easier until I messed up and the rear cylinder chain must have slipped some teeth on the crank shaft at the bottom. But it is no big deal, just follow the instructions in the service manual to get them aligned again.

I suppose a ball end allen with long extensions would have worked to get them off, but then you still have to get them back on. By using the screwdriver and clamp, you don't have to take them off at all and you don't have to worry about the gaskets and all that.

I never heard about swapping with Gen2 ccts.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,027 Posts
Every 15k miles is the recommended inspection interval. Checking the clearance is fairly easy. These are shim UNDER buckets, so you have to remove the cams to lift the buckets out.
Thanks for the info...If I wasn't so lazy I'd have looked it up myself :p With your description I figured these were shim-unders. I wonder what the advantage is since it makes adjustment more involved???
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top