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I have an O4 SV650 was 16000 miles on it It has recently developed A new noise, the best I can describe as Clunking or clacking type sound that occurs Once warmed up After I've been cruising for a few miles, when it comes down into the lower rpm. It seems to Go away when it's up in the higher RpmIf I cruise in 3rd year at say 45 miles an hour it goes away but the Second I let off the throttle and come down in Rpm The Clunking / clacking starts again. Anyone have any insight on where it may be coming from ?
 

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5k miles, that is odd, mad. Is that with a quality o-ring chain?
5K miles on a chain is way too low. 16K even seems low to me. I usually replace mine every 25K.
xring or oring DID is what i usually buy. oh and 520 pitch
i think the difference between us though is i'm absolutely hammering them with both throttle and downshifts (i dont ever ride bikes casually in any manner of speaking). and then they sit for a month while i ride other bikes. rinse repeat.
 

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xring or oring DID is what i usually buy. oh and 520 pitch
i think the difference between us though is i'm absolutely hammering them with both throttle and downshifts (i dont ever ride bikes casually in any manner of speaking). and then they sit for a month while i ride other bikes. rinse repeat.
I am mostly a commuter. And I tend to keep up on chain maintenance. In my experience dirty chains are the shortest lived chains.

Anyway, OP you need to check your chain slack. Service Manual 2-23. Drive chain 20-pitch length limit is 319.4 mm / 12.6 in. 16K miles could be a normal interval in which to replace your chain, depending on your riding habits.
 

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I am mostly a commuter. And I tend to keep up on chain maintenance. In my experience dirty chains are the shortest lived chains.
It is not necessary to apply chain lube to an o ring chain, they are permanently lubed when they are manufactured. A bit of ACF-50 to prevent rust once or twice a year is all your chain needs. It will stay clean because there won't be an unsightly buildup of sticky chain lube everywhere attracting dirt.
 

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It is not necessary to apply chain lube to an o ring chain, they are permanently lubed when they are manufactured. A bit of ACF-50 to prevent rust once or twice a year is all your chain needs. It will stay clean because there won't be an unsightly buildup of sticky chain lube everywhere attracting dirt.
There's more to a chain than the rollers and o-rings. When you lubricate a chain you are lubricating the outside, not the inside. This means reducing wear when the chain comes in to contact with the sprockets. It also prevents rust from forming on the steel chain. Rust can damage your chain, sprockets, bike, and you, far faster than a dirty chain can.
 

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ACF-50 prevents rust better than anything out there. As the bushings wear the chain will stretch and in around 20K miles it'll be toast. Chain lube will not increase the service life of the drivetrain, it will only make a mess.
 

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The O or X rings only seal the inner bushings that wear on the rivets. The outer rollers that contact the sprockets are not sealed, and the O rings also require some external lube for a longer life.

Can you tell which side the noise is coming from? Left side would indicate final drive (chain & sprockets). If it's right side, I was thinking maybe the clutch basket and/or drive plates, but the mileage is pretty low for excessive wear.
 

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The O or X rings only seal the inner bushings that wear on the rivets. The outer rollers that contact the sprockets are not sealed, and the O rings also require some external lube for a longer life.
Whatever your religion is
 

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What lng said is correct. The outer rollers are not sealed. The question is, how much does lube vs no lube at the outer roller affect overall chain life?
54183
 

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Gotta lube those chains, boys.
When a bike gets a nice dose of chain lube, the bike is much easier to push around. That's because the o-rings are lubed and friction between the o-rings and the surfaces they contact is greatly reduced. If an unlubed chain makes the bike harder to push, it means that as you ride, more horsepower is needed to propel the bike. A lubed chain will cut frictional losses and deliver more HP to the rear wheel.

ALL the chain manufacturers recommend lubing their chains. But what do they know? :)
 

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ACF-50 will keep the o-rings supple without out all the mess. I agree the rollers and sprockets are better off with lube, just as timing chains running in a sealed oil bath seldom wear out. But in the nasty world of exposed drive chains it's the sealed bushings that will wear out first, causing stretching and hooking before any benefit of lube between the chain and sprockets is ever realized. I've tried it both ways, my chains last a long time. I guess ACF-50 is sort of a lube anyway, so it's not really flaunting manufacturer's recommendations for chain lubing. You should try it.
 
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