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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those that have adjusted the clearance themselves.
Did you purchase adjustment shims individually or did you have to buy the "Tappet Shim Set"?

Ill be checking the valve to cam clearance some time soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
$446 for a SET!!!!!!!!!! versus $5 for each piece..............

Thanks for the link.
The Chart is pretty self explanatory .

Will I need new valve cover gaskets?
 

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the valve cover gaskets are rubber, so as long as you don't destroy them you're fine.

as for shims... don't buy a set. get the measurements. pull the cams, see what shims you can swap around, and then take the left over "useless" ones down to your local dealer and see if they'll exchange the shims you have for the shims you need. if not, they're usually $5/shim.

the most important part of this whole deal is to make sure you keep records.

-make a diagram of both heads, labeled Front and Rear, and each valve on each head
-Keep records of the clearances as you measure them for each valve
-pull the cams
-measure each shim (even the ones you don't need to replace because clearance is in spec
-swap any you can into places they're needed
-replace any you can't swap
-record the shim sizes in every valve
-reassemble

now, it's a little extra work to record the shim sizes, but the next time you do a shim replacement, you'll know what size shim you need before you pull the cams. so you can order the parts and do the cam pull/shim swap/replace all at once. plus you can see trends on which valves have gotten tight and how long it took to get there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the valve cover gaskets are rubber, so as long as you don't destroy them you're fine.

as for shims... don't buy a set. get the measurements. pull the cams, see what shims you can swap around, and then take the left over "useless" ones down to your local dealer and see if they'll exchange the shims you have for the shims you need. if not, they're usually $5/shim.

the most important part of this whole deal is to make sure you keep records.

-make a diagram of both heads, labeled Front and Rear, and each valve on each head
-Keep records of the clearances as you measure them for each valve
-pull the cams
-measure each shim (even the ones you don't need to replace because clearance is in spec
-swap any you can into places they're needed
-replace any you can't swap
-record the shim sizes in every valve
-reassemble

now, it's a little extra work to record the shim sizes, but the next time you do a shim replacement, you'll know what size shim you need before you pull the cams. so you can order the parts and do the cam pull/shim swap/replace all at once. plus you can see trends on which valves have gotten tight and how long it took to get there.
That's great info.
Highly appreciate everyone's notes.

Now I feel comfortable enough to get into the task.
Thanks.
 

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the valve cover gaskets are rubber, so as long as you don't destroy them you're fine.

as for shims... don't buy a set. get the measurements. pull the cams, see what shims you can swap around, and then take the left over "useless" ones down to your local dealer and see if they'll exchange the shims you have for the shims you need. if not, they're usually $5/shim.

the most important part of this whole deal is to make sure you keep records.

-make a diagram of both heads, labeled Front and Rear, and each valve on each head
-Keep records of the clearances as you measure them for each valve
-pull the cams
-measure each shim (even the ones you don't need to replace because clearance is in spec
-swap any you can into places they're needed
-replace any you can't swap
-record the shim sizes in every valve
-reassemble

now, it's a little extra work to record the shim sizes, but the next time you do a shim replacement, you'll know what size shim you need before you pull the cams. so you can order the parts and do the cam pull/shim swap/replace all at once. plus you can see trends on which valves have gotten tight and how long it took to get there.

Excellent post. Nothing to add but a few side things not in conflict with the above:

-- Remember that valves on a shim-under-bucket valvetrain (the SV's) get tighter as they come to operating temp. This is opposite to a rocker-arm valvetrain (Bandit/Katana/pre-SRAD GSX-Rs), which get looser as they warm.*

-- Make all measurements with your feelers a go/no-go. If a feeler can go in with the strength of your fingers, but gets the door slammed on the next size up, (.004" vs. .005", for example), then the one that went in is the clearance.

-- What I do is draw the valves as circles on a piece of cardboard, as the way they'd physically look when sitting on the bike... leave enough room for notes around each circle, then take your measurements. IIRC, it's .004" - .008" IN, .008" - .012" EX. Circle or underline the measurement if it's out of spec or right on if it's on the tight side. You ideally want the middle of the spec, as when a shim-under valvetrain wears, it gets tighter.

-- SV valvetrains of both generations are loud even adjusted, so don't be alarmed if your bike makes a bit of tapping when cold or under load -- if you did your work right, it's fine. ;)

--

* I used to set valves on the Yamaha V-Stars and the rocker-arm Suzukis on the tight side of spec -- they'd have plenty of power, no sealing problems, and not sound like twenty IBM Selectrics when warm. Besides, once the locknut settings got a few miles in them, they'd loosen slightly. The tiny bit of duration and lift from the tight-but-still-spec settings on V-Star 650s and 1100s made a slight improvement in response as well, with a touch of fuel screw for the low-end. ;)
 
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