Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is just a little spot for my latest project.

What I'm starting with:
- 1999 SV650 S (Converted into an N by previous owner)
- Yellow paintwork
- 40,000 miles
- New tyres
- New chain & sprockets
- New discs & pads
- Stored for 4 years as the previous owner fell in love with his KTM
- The worst set of fork seals I've ever seen on a bike - Ever
- Paid £500 - I think that's pretty good considering all the new kit that was fitted

I wasn't on SVRider, nor was I taking photos up until very recently - So I'll get up to present day as quickly as I can.

First of all, the bike had been dropped (hence the N conversion) and the subframe and tail plastics were pretty heavily damaged. I decided it would be best to replace the whole rear end as a unit. But not with a stock rear end.

The top mounts from my Daytona 675 subframe fit the SV frame pretty nicely... Too nicely...
Bolted them up but the bottom mounts were miles off - A trip to my local friendly fabricator sorted them out. Seat & plastics fit together perfectly.
Had Mr Fabricator work on the underseat exhaust link pipe and hey presto! A bodged underseat exhaust!

With some creative bracketry, the Buell front end mounted up reasonably well. A bit of wiring, and all was good to go.

That left me with this:


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
The Buell front end was never a permanent solution - Especially with those higher bars on.
Time for some clip ons!

I ordered some of these adjustable clip ons from a good friend of mine, and I must say I'm impressed! I was a but dubious about build quality and gripping ability of the angle screws, but you could jump up and down on them and they'd stay set!


I also decided it was time for that buell fairing to go. Maybe a naked look would be good?


No - I'd miss the wind protection of a windscreen. How about a full fairing?


It's only draped over the bike in that pic, but I'd say that's more like it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Now for the electrics. The daytona battery had enough juice to keep the engine running, but it would die when trying to start the bike.
In comes motobatt!
Squeezed one of these under the seat (Made even trickier by the ZX10 shock!) and it fired right up!
The Daytona exhaust, crossed with the new type K&N fitted by the previous owner, meant it ran like hell - When I stripped the carb he hadn't even rejetted it! More on that later anyway.

So with a running bike, I needed to concentrate on the wiring loom. I'm going to need a speedo and lights at the front end.
I decided on a SanSan SS182 for the speedo. It's a koso knockoff from china with reasonable reviews. It has tach, speed, idiot lights, trip, odometer, gear indicator, fuel gauge & lights:


This is currently on its way to the UK, so more to come on that.

For headlights, you can't beat triumph OEM right? Wrong.
Here is the standard beam pattern for the Daytona (It's at a really close range so you wouldn't expect it to be great):



And to top it off, it's 1 projector for low & one for high!
I've never been a fan of the one dead eye look, personally...(Apologies for the ungodly bad image quality)


So - Out with the old... I baked in the oven at 150c for 7 minutes and attacked it with a screwdriver...



That's the lenses removed.
I then got some custom headlight brackets lasercut to mount my new flashy bi-xenon projectors:


I'm also taking this moment to spray paint all of the headlight inners in a nice flat black and mount some angel eyes:


Which also double as indicators


I'm currently trying to find some 501 bulbs that support both white and orange - It looks a little dark in there without the side lights. So far I've only found RGB ones which need a remote control. I might just buy them and strip the receiver out of the bulbs to wire them manually.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
So let's talk paint!
Orange isn't really my thing any more, and I kind of wanted something that looked a bit racy.

I've always loved the dream machine rizla livery for the Suzuki motogp bikes (Primarily the GSV-R).
I wanted to bring the same scheme to my SV-Daytona thingy which was also crying out for a name.
A few beers later, me and some friends decided to go with SVD-R to stick with a suzuki naming convention but also to throw the daytona aspect in there. SVD made everyone think of the good old Dragunov rifle, so a nickname was born. This is the bike that I was always in love with:


A little bit of drunk photoshop later (I'm not very good sober, so this a miracle by my standards):



If you ignore the colour and the quality - I think it's safe to say that a plan is brewing...

All it needs is some sort of logo...

Again - Very rough, but I thought it might inspire me to go further with this project.

Once the hangover had cleared up, I rebuilt the forks with new springs, bushes, seals and oil (obviously). Hopefully this balances things out with the stupidly tough rear shock that was fitted by the previous owner.


And this is where the past-present tense confusion ends! this is now present day, and progress is trickling slowly.
I'm about to cut the baffle out of my Daytona exhaust (until a decent aftermarket can comes along for a reasonable price) and clean & rejet the carbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I actually have one more thing to add before I go.
Using a dremel and a coarse file, I opened up my new style K&N filter, to see what happens. Worst case scenario, I have a brand new stock filter in the garage.



During this spell of bad weather, I'm designing a circuit to convert the output of a pointy gear position sensor into a language that my SS182 speedo will be able to read.
I'll fit the sensor when I change my oil & filter next week which will also disable the ignition retard in gears 2 & 3.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Today I decided I'll MoT the bike as a naked - So I guess I'll have to get it running sooner rather than later.

The first step in doing so would be rejetting the carbs for the new air filter and the triumph exhaust. But first, I have some changes to make to the exhaust.
According to my marvellous MS paint skills - The flow path is as follows(The photo is stolen from a triumph forum):


Some of the guys on the triumph forum have been known to drill a small hole down the exit pipe of the silencer to get a little more noise. As you can see - The pipe is quite restrictive so I want to drill something a little larger. The idea is to use a 35mm hole saw to cut a plate out of the baffle - Like so:








That's better.

Now to go home and clean and rejet the carbs.

Bonus picture: Here's the bike with the standard front end - Ready (ish) for an MoT!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top