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The SV650S was my 1st bike, used of course, got it for a steal. Why I liked it?

No lower fairing to f*** up if you do a low speed drop. I did THREE zero mph drops within a week, once by kickstand error, and the other two by me trying to learn the clutch. Damage? Bar ends got chipped.

Low end torque with a pretty broad powerband for street riding.

It's a forgiving bike. Not as forgiving as the other beginner bikes, but forgiving nonetheless. First week on the bike was a lot of right hand play, where my right hand would twitch by going over a speed bump, a pothole, or anything. Imagine going over a speed bump with a R6 as a beginner and accidentally twitching the throttle one inch unexpectedly from 5 mph.

Again, there's good potential to get used SV's for cheap. And then there's always that alternative in getting a $500 beater standard and learning to run the hell out of that thing :D

-Sam
 

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I haven't kept score,but at least 2/3 of the people said start on something else. Now,these are SV. riders,who would like to welcome you! :)
 

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samz3r said:
Imagine going over a speed bump with a R6 as a beginner and accidentally twitching the throttle one inch unexpectedly from 5 mph.
-Sam

Imagine: Not much would happen. The SV is the worse "twitch" bike due to the torque available at low RPMS. Now, twitch the throttle at 60mph at the apex of a corner in second gear and the SV becomes the less twitchy.
 

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I started on the SV. No problems here. If you're mature and take it easy until you're comfortable, it's a great beginner bike and you won't grow out of it quickly. 1.5 yrs and 4000 miles later, still puts a big smile on my face everytime I mount up!
 

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i started on an old '71 350 and had a great time :p this was pre msf and looking back i really had no idea what i was doing, had that bike been a sv i am positive that i would have had a much harder time of things. Bikes are not like cars, it takes a thousand times more skill and coordination to operate one safely, start small. It will be fun and once you feel confident enough step up, used beginner bikes sell for just about what you pay and insurance is super cheap :p

Until about a week ago i thought the sv was a very good beginers bike as far as modern bikes go, but in helping a friend (brand new rider) fix up and test out his '94 ninja 500 my eyes have been opened to how much better that bike is for a new rider, sooooo easy to ride while still being plenty fast enough to give you feel for what riding sportbike is like. Actually i think i might go over to help him "test it out" again this weekend :wink:

you can do alot worse than an sv650 for a first ride, but don't underestimate how much fun a ninja 500 or similar can be.
 

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buy a bike you can afford to own, insure, wreck AND have stolen. shit's going to happen to your bike eventually, especially if you're just starting to learn. it's much easier to insure, fix, AND replace a $1,000 beater than a $5,000 sv.

i started riding three years ago on the smallest and cheapest bike i could find. after a few months i moved up to a slightly larger, but even cheaper beater. i could not imagine becoming a proficient rider by learning how to ride on an sv.
 

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jdb said:
I have just taken the MSF class, and was going to buy a Honda Hawk, until the seller told me he did not want to sell it to a beginner. So, I know the SV is a lot more power then the Hawk, but is the bike something that a beginner can handle?
Thanks
See my response to this. If you were rocking the MSF class, e.g. could pass with your eyes closed, then you might consider the SV as a first bike that will be harder to learn on. If you have any reservations about your capabilities to control throttle, clutch, brakes or basic balance, I'd get something smaller. If you do the SV consider yourself on the accelerated program and pick up "Proficient Motorcycling" and read that ASAP.

http://forum.svrider.com/viewtopic.php?p=452136&highlight=#452136
 

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We'll beat this dead horse once again. Almost all the more experienced riders (ie 15,000+ miles) would recommend something smaller than the SV to start on for a complete noob. They say this with the benefit of seat time, and often trying several different bikes. It's got nothing with respecting the bike or using your head... seat time doesn't just come to a noob straight from MSF. Listen to riders who've spent a few years in all weather conditions and racked up serious mileage. The SV is a good (no Great) bike, but the jury's still out if it's good for the rank novice.

As for the Honda Hawk, it was the SV of its day. A great all round bike.
 

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Well, my first bike was/is a GS500. Great bike, I love mine to death. Literally, since, well, its dead now. No real fault of my own though, after 16 years and something like 12 owners, it gave up the ghost, and I see more profit in parting her out to good homes and upgrading than trying to keep up with the game of mechanical whack-a-mole she's making me play. After well over 10,000 miles, I feel that I've learned a fair amount from my GS, and I can handle a bigger bike. Not everything the GS can teach, of course, but enough to allow me to learn the lessons that a bike like the SV can teach,

I hope to have a new SV in the garage by the end of next week. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
An SV is a great bike to start on, and alot of the people who start on SVs flat out refuse to ever get another bike, its just a damn good bike that you wont get sick of.

Get it and have fun man!
 
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