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Discussion Starter #1
After building up my SV into a Scrambler, I decided to ride today after 8 days of rain. What I normally ride in the dry was still packed and my Shinko's gripped well. So I decided to try something more challenging, mud soaked roads. Well, it didn't pan out too well. I went down so fast. It was like riding on Ice. I'm not even sure if 50/50 tires would have helped; mine are 70/30. I have the Shinko 705's. As they said, they don't work well on mud and sandy conditions; only graded fireroads.....they are right.

So here was my dilemma, I could not pick up the bike. It laid on it's side, perpendicular to the road. Using the technique of picking it up using your legs with your back against the bike didn't work. I couldn't get the bike up to 45 degrees in which you can easily stand it up. My feet kept slipping and sliding and when I did get it to 45 degrees, the tires would slip in the mud and go right back down. I hiked 1.5 miles back to the main road and flagged down a truck driver who helped me lift the bike back up.

Is there a proper technique to lifting your bike up when it is perpendicular to the ground?

All the videos you see of little women picking up huge Harleys using that technique is fine wheb the bike is sitting on it's panniers and on a hard surface for your feet to grip on.

I had my GoPro on when it happened:

https://youtu.be/SWtPhiOwgpo

Suggestions are more than welcomed.

Lesson leaned: Never go off roading again without somebody with me. A SV650 is a light bike, but when it's down flat on its side, it's damned heavy.
 

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1. I love Napa.

2. Eeeewwww.

3. At that point I would've just deadlifted the bike (facing it). If slippery mud had made it too difficult to keep everything under control, I would have probably dragged the bike a bit to a spot with more feet traction.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I did. I dragged the bike until you couldn't drag it anymore, then tried to lift, facing it. Each time, I could not get it pass a 45 degree angle as the tires would slip again. As a result, I also pulled a lower back muscle lifting it facing forward. Also, when I dragged the bike, I bent the rear brake lever dragging it across the mud. Slippery mud is something I never thought about. Even walking the 1.5 miles to the road, I fell twice as the mud was that slippery. Other than another person with me, I deduct that there is no other way to right the bike under those conditions.
 

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At that point I would've just deadlifted the bike (facing it). If slippery mud had made it too difficult to keep everything under control, I would have probably dragged the bike a bit to a spot with more feet traction.
I had to do that several times when I was younger. I can't do it anymore, so I installed a stunt cage and a set of saddle bags filled with bubble pack.
This stops the fall at an angle, where I can lift it. I also think it would enhance the "Scrambler vibe."
stunt cage.jpg
https://www.ebay.com/itm/GG-Racing-stunt-crash-cage-for-Suzuki-SV-650-2003-2007/223300183001?fits=Model:SV650&hash=item33fdba63d9:m:myQqiv4-zGA2JnBxZsPqbdg&LH_BIN=1
 

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That's what I did. I dragged the bike until you couldn't drag it anymore, then tried to lift, facing it. Each time, I could not get it pass a 45 degree angle as the tires would slip again. As a result, I also pulled a lower back muscle lifting it facing forward. Also, when I dragged the bike, I bent the rear brake lever dragging it across the mud. Slippery mud is something I never thought about. Even walking the 1.5 miles to the road, I fell twice as the mud was that slippery. Other than another person with me, I deduct that there is no other way to right the bike under those conditions.
Mud can be an absolute *****. Was riding with a couple of buddies in the Moab area some years back, one guy dropped his Triumph Tiger in some nasty slick mud. Took all three of us to get it upright, and that was a close run thing.

My motto: If you want to ride dirt, get a dirt bike.
 

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Where in Napa was this?

If you haven't taken it, try Reiff Road/Road 40, north of Berryessa. They close it in the winter, though, due to mud.

I'm not sure how you'd lift it.
 

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So is there a way to lift the bike under those conditions if you are alone?
yep, kickstand down, push with your back (use your legs).

failing all that, drag/shuffle it towards the ditch, tree, whatever to give yourself more of a shot
 

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I dropped my L3 on an adventure riding training course. The technique I was taught worked. (I'm 172 cm / 68 Kg, 64 yrs young, lean). Twist the handlebars, so the front of the wheel points skyward, squat , cup both hands under the downside handgrip, TUCK YOUR BACK IN and TILT HEAD RIGHT BACK to look at the sky. Keep looking up and straighten your legs. This was gravelly not muddy, but I knew the "harley " lift didn't work on lean bikes.

Hope this helps. P.S. put the sidestand down first - of course, if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I dragged the bike in the mud until it stopped against the mud piled up. Ended up bending the foot brake as a result and throwing out my back. Tried liftig it with my back against the bike and lifting with my legs, but my boots kept slipping on the mud. Once I got to a 45 degree angle, the bike would slip on its tires and fall back down. Walked over a mile to the main road and flagged down a truck driver to help me lift the bike. He slipped as well and another vineyard worker came along to help. It took 3 of us to get the bike upright.

The area is in the Carneros Valley beyond Domaine Carneros winery. I was told by the truck drivers that it was private property even though there were no signs posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I hurt my back trying to lift the bike both by my legs then facing the bike. Neither technique worked, so I hike the 1.5 miles back to the road to flag down somebody. I did but it took two people and myself to right the bike. 430 lbs laying flat is much harder than it looks
 

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if you go down, it's a crash. What else do you call it?
a dozen-times-daily event when riding dirt?



but yeah, wtf it's like we're gatekeeping crashing...
 
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