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has anyone made the move from a SV to a V Strom, have an 07 SV 650S model, hard on the right wrist after 45 min of riding, sat on a sv650N yesterday, legs felt a little cramped and the bars felt very narrow, not sure I the N model would suit me, so then the 650 V Strom is my next thought, has anyone ever ridden the 650 V Strom. what are the pro & cons coming off of the SV 650. I know they are taller, are they top heavy to a point where it is easy to drop it at slow speeds

Chet
 

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has anyone made the move from a SV to a V Strom, have an 07 SV 650S model, hard on the right wrist after 45 min of riding, sat on a sv650N yesterday, legs felt a little cramped and the bars felt very narrow, not sure I the N model would suit me, so then the 650 V Strom is my next thought, has anyone ever ridden the 650 V Strom. what are the pro & cons coming off of the SV 650. I know they are taller, are they top heavy to a point where it is easy to drop it at slow speeds

Chet
That's because you are putting too much weight on your arms/hands.

Use your core to hold you up when you ride. It'l take time, but you'll manage to get used to it.

Try fixing how you ride, before you go changing what you ride because those problems will chase you from bike to bike.
 

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I've ridden a weestrom and would like to try the big strom. But with my limited experience with the weestrom, I don't think there's enough of a difference to the SV to warrant a new bike. New bars + a bigger windshield on the SV would probably do the trick. The only real pro would be a slight increase in ground clearance and a front wheel more oriented for 'off road' (but the Strom is definitely still a streetbike).
 

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Some WeeStrom riders swap the OEM 19" wheel for a 17" SV wheel. Makes handling a little smoother and allows easy use of more sport-oriented tires.
I keep saying I'm going to sell my DL650 (Wee), but it's just so Da..ed comfortable to ride, especially for longer distances. The V-Strom does feel a little more top-heavy than the SV and it can be a real handful to keep the bike upright if you put your foot down and your foot starts to slide. I feel safer on the SV with the ABS, but the V-Strom is much more comfortable. Everytime I get on it, I realize why selling it will be so hard to get used to.
I put Buell footpegs on my SV. They place your feet about 1" down compared to the OEM pegs, but also move the rider's feet out about 1 ", making the rider pigeon toe to reach the pedals. I got used to it quickly enough that I never bothered modding the pedals to stick out a little more, although I must admit that occasionally my knees feel a little twisted. The Busa forums should have some pics of extending the pedals.
 

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In terms of reach the strom still needs bar risers imho. Proper body position did more to alleviate my pains than anything. I loved the ability to stand on a strom to stretch instead of being in a near stunt position on the sv.
 

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I really thought about selling my bike to get a strom because I figured it would fit me better.

In the end a pair of rearsets made all of the difference in the world and made the sv viable for me.

My point is that a seemingly small ergonomic change can totally transform your experience. Give it some thought. ;)
 

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I have a Wee-Strom and an SV650S. The 'Strom gets all of the all-day rides - super comfortable, including for a passenger. I don't find it top heavy at all - and I've raised the back end one inch. It handles the twisties great. At this point in my riding experience (~40k miles on the 'Strom, ~ 4k miles on the SV), I'd say the 'Strom is just as fun as the SV in the tight stuff. Maybe this will change by the time I get 40k miles on the SV.

The SV it noticeably more powerful, though. The 'Strom has enough for me, but it's more fun to blast though the gears on the SV. I've got a Yosh pipe on the SV. I don't know how much of the fun factor is due to that (modest power gain? surly the exhaust tone helps) vs. the differences between the two engines (cams, intakes, flywheel).

I love the SV, but if I was only able to have one of the bikes, it would be the 'Strom.
 

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The V-Strom series is a great bike. Same powerplant as the SV's (obviously), but with more comfort and ergonomics towards longer days in the saddle, and a bit more ability for light off-roading. Granted, there are videos and threads galore "proving" that the SV is more off-road worthy, or that the V-Strom can take single-track with the best of them, but let's face it... that's not what most riders will use it for.

For every day commuting in all kinds of weather, a weekend trip to your super-secret campground in the mountains, or a 3-week adventure to Alaska, the V-Strom will do it, and do it quite well, even bone stock. Toss on a few extras, like bags, crash bars, heated grips, and GPS, and you've got yourself a fine personal vehicle for the coming zombie appocolypse. :thumbsup:

The Strom will handle a bit better on the pavement with a smaller front wheel. Just remember though that it will handle worse if you decide to head off the pavement, or try to navigate those few muddy ruts up in the hills on your way to that camping spot. If you planned on doing any off-roading at all, and when you do you'll want more (dirt to dual-sporting is like modding to street riders), I'd leave the front wheel as-is.

If you find yourself enjoying street riding, but not really knee-dragging, and long for the open road and pristine back roads, the V-Strom is a perfect choice. A great all-around bike for the 2-wheel nut. The poor-man's (or financially conscious man's ;)) Multistrada, if you will. :thumbsup:
 

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Ive been in the same boat for a while. 2up the bike is miserable for us and we are little people. My hands tend to go numb after riding a while and the seat is so uncomfortable that i want to ghost ride it into a ditch after 30-40 miles. So i put a set of Tusk CHUB 1/1/8" bars in atv high bend on plus the adapter which has made a big difference. Right hand still gets a little numb. I have a friend who has a set of rox risers im gonna try. I had to get a 2-3" longer brake hose and reroute some wires but it works. I have a front and back mayer seat seat coming for the arse comfort. Also trying to find a rubber passenger peg that will fit for the wife. Her feet go numb. And if i this doesnt work i guess i will part from her. It will be hard since i bought her brand new in 2001.
 

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My friend had a '07 DL 650 for about 4yrs. He just traded it in for a new '10 Tiger 1050. He enjoyed the strom, but likes the power of the Triumph. If ultimate power doesn't mean anything to you, then the strom is a very good choice for a street bike.
 

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I don't think I could own a Wee as my only bike, I love the SVS in the twisties, but I would love to get one as a second bike, maybe a Vee for the added power. They are just goofy fun to ride, seating position is comfortable, there is plenty of leg room, and they move along pretty well. It's definitely nice to unfold yourself from the SVS and stretch out on the Vstrom.

Comfort on the SVS isn't hard to come by though, Sargent seat, SVRP 3.5" raised clip-ons, and ride with the balls of your feet on the pegs so your legs can support you more. I put Buell pegs on mine and I LOVE the room they give you, it really is amazing how much of a difference that 1-1.5" makes in comfort. Unfortunately it also is amazing how much of a difference that 1-1.5" makes in ground clearance. I dragged them and my boots often enough that I took them off. I miss the extra space, but I don't miss wearing off the edges of my boots and dragging them everywhere.
 

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I'm not very familiar with the V Strom but I have heard from many Convertibars users that the ability to raise and lower the bars quickly makes them feel like they have two bikes. One is the stock posture sport bike for ripping the twisties and the other ( after a 5 minute adjustment) is a comfortable bike perfect for riding two up or convering some distance without the aches and pains associated with the stock riding position. Here is a link to a review by a fellow SV enthusiast right here at sv rider http://www.svrider.com/forum/showthread.php?t=156673&highlight=convertibars
 
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