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while i was taking the snorkle off tonight i was thinking about the crappyness of the front forks and i was wondering if 1. the preload would make much of a difference for both the fron and rear and 2. what should both of them be set at. I am 145lbs
 

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I am setting the sag for 30 - 35 mm both front and rear for street purposes.

The sag is determined by preloading the springs. I have it down to a quick method now ...

I have front and rear stands which make lifting the bike quick, safe and fast.
I use two stepladders one on each side of the bike with a two by four across the top.
I lift the bike up onto the stands, I then use nylon web tiedowns to tie the triple snug to the 2x4.
I then release the front stand and measure the extended fork from the bottom triple to the seal.
I then raise it up again with the stands. I then put a zip tie on the fork and slide it down to the seal.
Sit on the bke, while it is on the stands.

Measure the zip tie from the bottom of the triple. Subract your last measurement from your first.
20 to 30 mm is track settings, stiff and a bit harsh on the butt.
30 - 35 mm is more for the street, mine is almost there, I have to trim my spacer a bit more.
When you screw in the preload adjusters, you reduce the sag but there is a 1 cm limit which ain't much.
Mine are all the way out right now with 28mm sag.

If you have more than 35 mm sag, you have the stock suspension and are overloading it.
At the very least, get Sonic springs for your weight and put 20 weight oil in.

I swear that the original fork oil was automatic transmission fluid, thin like water, looked like tranny fluid, smelled like tranny fluid and felt like tranny fluid.
 

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dafro42 said:
while i was taking the snorkle off tonight i was thinking about the crappyness of the front forks and i was wondering if 1. the preload would make much of a difference for both the fron and rear and 2. what should both of them be set at. I am 145lbs
Regardless of how crappy your suspension is, you should always have the sag set as correctly as possible. Shoot for the rider sag number, but never let that dictate zero free sag. In other words, if you want 30mm of rider sag on the shock but to get that you have to crank the preload up so much that you don't have any free sag, then back it off until you have 5mm of free sag, even if that means you have 40mm of rider sag. The reality is that if the springs are wrong for your weight, you'll only be able to go so far with it. I like to see 30mm of rider sag in the rear and 35mm in the front, but there are as many opinions of proper sag numbers as there are trees in the forest, so just get it close and tweak it to your liking based upon actual riding results. If you can swing a suspension upgrade, you'll likely be much happier with it, the difference is incredible.
 

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like jarel said, everyone likes different setups, but i like 35-37 on the front and 32-34 in the rear with a lot of free sag(20mm up front and 8-10 in the rear).
 

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How do you get FREE SAG ?

Understand preload and rider sag, but free sag is a by product of what you got? i.e. spring rate?
 

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Currently said:
How do you get FREE SAG ?

Understand preload and rider sag, but free sag is a by product of what you got?  i.e. spring rate?
free sag is the amount of sag the bike has under its own weight. measure it fully topped out, then just the bike with no rider. most commonly on stock springs, you may get a correct rider sag figure, but the spring is undersprung and you have no, or very little, free sag.
 
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