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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I'm in the process of installing stainless steel brake lines, got the rear done and go onto the front to find out that one of the screws on the brake reservoir cap is stripped.

I have a tap and die set but I'm nervous about drilling out the screw considering how thin the wall of the reservoir is.

Any suggestions on how best to proceed?

I remember seeing infomercials a couple years ago for drill bits that are supposed to grab onto the top of stripped screws but can't remember what they were called. Can you remind me what they're call, and let me know if any of you had success with this method?

Thanks for the help
 

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I remember seeing infomercials a couple years ago for drill bits that are supposed to grab onto the top of stripped screws but can't remember what they were called. Can you remind me what they're call, and let me know if any of you had success with this method?

Thanks for the help
Easy outs or screw extractors are a common names for them, they can work as long as the screw is not stuck or frozen. It' might be cheaper to buy a new reservoir then the tools, but any auto parts store or Sears/Home Depot/Lowes will have them. I've used a couple different ones and they take some finess to avoid breaking anything else or making them work correctly.





 

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This...had to do the same thing. Take it easy and it will go easy. Rush it and it won't.

Easy outs or screw extractors are a common names for them, they can work as long as the screw is not stuck or frozen. It' might be cheaper to buy a new reservoir then the tools, but any auto parts store or Sears/Home Depot/Lowes will have them. I've used a couple different ones and they take some finess to avoid breaking anything else or making them work correctly.





 

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Is the screw broken or just stripped?
If stripped you dont need any special tools. Take out the good screw and use upward pressure with the cap while unscrewing the dud one.
Take the resevoir off the bike and try to re-tap then rinse well before installing.
If that fails, get a new one.
You have to bleed the brakes anyway.
 

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N or S model? The S model's reservoir is pretty cheap to replace (mine got taken off by a soda can launched out of an SUV going the opposite direction). I don't think the N model's is much more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sorry for any confusion - should have been more clear.

I have a naked model and the actual threads are fine, it's the top of the screw that is rounded off or 'stripped' so I can't unscrew it.

If there's enough left, use a dremel or file and work out a notch on the head and flathead that sucker out.
I think this might work if i have a fine enough dremel bit/file. But the screw is so tiny it might be a challenge.

I'm going to Sears during my lunch hour and will try to find a Grab-it set, but again - the top of the screw is so small i'm not sure they'll have a small enough bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just get a new reservoir and get rid of the hassle...
On the naked model, replacing the reservoir means replacing the front master cylinder too. Now that's a hassle - an expensive one!

Could always get one of those small magnetic Phillips bits and jb weld it to the top of the screw. Let it set and back it out.
Clever idea. I've never welded/tacked anything though, but I could see that coming in handy someday.
 

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Sorry for any confusion - should have been more clear.

I have a naked model and the actual threads are fine, it's the top of the screw that is rounded off or 'stripped' so I can't unscrew it.


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Ohhhhh - they make bits for that that would fix you right up right at Sears! I have a set and they've saved my arse more than once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Okay, so I just got back from Sears. I picked up a very pointy dremel bit that's meant for engraving metal. My plan is to very carefully cut a shallow channel across the top of the screw head, and then use a flathead screw driver to get it out. I think it will work.. I hope it will work.

While I was there I also found Craftsmans equivalent of the Grab-it drill bits. They looked nice and I could see them coming in handy in the future, but they were $35 so I passed on 'em for now.

Whatever you do (remove the screw, get a new reservoir, etc), take one of the bolts to the hardware store and get matching allen head bolts. Much easier to deal with down the road.
:thumbsup: Agreed!
 

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First thing you should have done was soak the screw in Liquid Wrench. Before I attempt to remove bolts on this bike for the first time I hit them up with a shot of Liquid Wrench and wait thirty minutes. The bolts on this bike are crap and snap off alot. A bolt had snapped off from the previous owner and he just left it like that. I shot the liquid wrench on it and overnight i could use finger pressure on the top of the head to get it out. Always try the liquid wrench first it will save you from alot of work, hassle, and possible breaking other crap too.
 

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First thing you should have done was soak the screw in Liquid Wrench. Before I attempt to remove bolts on this bike for the first time I hit them up with a shot of Liquid Wrench and wait thirty minutes. The bolts on this bike are crap and snap off alot. A bolt had snapped off from the previous owner and he just left it like that. I shot the liquid wrench on it and overnight i could use finger pressure on the top of the head to get it out. Always try the liquid wrench first it will save you from alot of work, hassle, and possible breaking other crap too.
I'm asking this with all sincerity because I don't know. Do you use Liquid Wrench on the M/C given the chance for contamination? Would you have to flush the fluid afterwards?
 

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You won't be putting enough to get into the reservoir plus the diaphragm would stop any leakage. Just spray some on and let it sit. It leeches between the contact areas and Voila! If something is really set in there give it a few hours or even overnight. You let it set overnight and the screw will practically fall out on its own, just kidding. But the stuff is amazing and these bikes need it.
 

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On the naked model, replacing the reservoir means replacing the front master cylinder too. Now that's a hassle - an expensive one!
Yes,you're right,I see this on the fiche.
Why don't you get a used master cylinder from the S model?
They are around 40USD on ebay.You will still be able to mount the mirroe since you already have the part#6 seen here:
http://www.ronayers.com/Fiche/TypeID/26/Type/Motorcycle/MakeID/2/Make/Suzuki/YearID/42/Year/2001/ModelID/6289/Model/SV650/GroupID/257695/Group/FRONT_MASTER_CYLINDER_SV650X_Y_K1_K2


PS:I never liked the naked model's M/C's:it's much easier to check the fluid level when you have a separate see through reservoir like the S has.
Looks cooler too.
 

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I ran into the same issue when removing mine on my 03' SV rearset mastercyclinder mount. Drill them out carefully about 1/4-1/3 the depth. That should relieve the pressure of the threads. Take a dremel and cut a slot for a flat head screwdriver into the screw head and unscrew them.

There is no need to retap the threads if you use the correct size drill bit. I has to be smaller than the bolt itself.

It took me all of 10 minutes start to finish.
 
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