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Hey everyone, this is my first time making a post but I’m wondering if someone can help. I’ve noticed that the bike has been heavy to push around the last few days, almost impossible if I leave it for a few days. I initially thought it was because of the grit that’s been put on the road, causing some resistance in the moving parts. But after popping it up onto a stand, where the wheels should be spinning freely, the front wheel can barely be moved. The front right disk is slightly loose, and has some play in them, (as did my 04 Gsxr600 funnily enough) but the wheel can barely be rotated with one hand. Not to mention, the front brake lever is noticeably blotchy and sticky when being pulled to its maximum. Any suggestions or advice on how to trouble shoot this will be appreciated. I’ll try and bleed them now to see if that’s any help.
 

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First step is disassemble and inspect that caliper, or both actually. Might be as simple as cleaning and lubing moving parts. Worst case scenario is rusted pistons and requires proper rebuild or replacement. Either way a flush and bleed of fluid never hurts.
Slop in the rotor pins might come in to play also. Wouldn't think that would cause binding as much as pulsating on braking.
 

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+1 for clean and lube calipers. Might be a good time to do a flush too.

Additionally, take the brake lever pivot screw out and have a look at it and the brass bushing inside the lever. Clean and grease and/or replace if worn.
 

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The caliper pistons on the Gen 2 SVs are, unfortunately, plated so they rust. Could also be corrosion build-up behind the dust or fluid seals in the calipers, which means the pistons don't retract when you release the lever. Or the master cylinder has crud in it.

As others said above, disassemble the calipers and see what's going on. The SV braking system is pretty simple so even if you've never done it before, it's fairly easy.

My tip is to buy and use the correct greases. Do NOT use any old grease on your brakes. You need some red rubber grease for the fluid and dust seals, and white silicone brake grease for the sliding pins. A small pot or tube of each will last you YEARS, you don't use much. Never, ever use copper grease on seals or sliding pins - it's an anti-seize compound, not a lubricant, so it dries out and your brakes get sticky again.
 
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