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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there!

Any recommendation on a steering damper that is under $500USD for a 05 SV650 naked?

Thanks,

~DR
 

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Question... Do you have standard suspension? If so, that $500 would be far better spent there. If you have stability issues, that's where they come from. You can treat the symptoms, but that's like taking painkillers for a cut. It stops it hurting but the cut's still there. Better to go to source and fix it.
 

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+1

Upgrading suspension totally transforms the bike.
Cost runs from 400 to 2000 for top of the line solutions for both ends of the bike.
Most here get by with springs and oil up front and revalved and resprung shock.

If you are getting tank slapping behavior with your bike, something is very wrong with your setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Northwind said:
Question... Do you have standard suspension? If so, that $500 would be far better spent there. If you have stability issues, that's where they come from. You can treat the symptoms, but that's like taking painkillers for a cut. It stops it hurting but the cut's still there. Better to go to source and fix it.
Yeah, it's stock, I heard steering dampers can help take smoothen the steering, perhaps it just needs a little adjustment to the tension. I will check my mechanic on this one.

Thanks,

~DR
 

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Northwind said:
Question... Do you have standard suspension? If so, that $500 would be far better spent there. If you have stability issues, that's where they come from. You can treat the symptoms, but that's like taking painkillers for a cut. It stops it hurting but the cut's still there. Better to go to source and fix it.
Can anyone actually answer the question? I'd like to know for future reference the best cost/performance options for dampers out there. Yes, my suspension is upgraded/non-stock and works pretty well.

Matt
 

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Not attractive, but effective. Not a really simple installation, but not rocket science either.
Look in Tips 'n Tricks under Suspension, Installing a Spec II Steering Damper. Actually, it's a Daytona adjustable. Read the article.
 

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The GPR? GRP? ones and Scotts seem very popular with Those Who Know... Me, I'd want an old-school 916-style across-the-head piston type... Ohlins probably, so that it'd match my rear shock ;D The purpose of a steering damper is to a) damp the steering and b) Look cool, and convince people that you're bike's a head-shaking b***ard that needs a real man to handle :)

You want variable speed resistance, so that it'll allow low speed movement (ie, road steering) to be relatively unimpeded with high speed (ie, a tankslapper) being strongly resisted. Lots of modern dampers do this really...

Davidro, you said you want to "smoothen the steering". Do you find it jerky in corners? Do you find yourself changing direction a lot in a bend? A damper can slow the steering but generally that's more an undesirable side-effect than the aim.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Northwind said:
Davidro, you said you want to "smoothen the steering". Do you find it jerky in corners? Do you find yourself changing direction a lot in a bend? A damper can slow the steering but generally that's more an undesirable side-effect than the aim.
Yes, it was a bit jerky, it does not require much pressure on the bars to change direction.  Then again, I'm a new rider so perhaps I just need to have a lighter touch.  But to me having a bit more tension on the bars would help a bit.

I found this in the manual, only set for 200g - 500g, I wonder how it is on other bikes?

STEERING TENSION ADJUSTMENT
Check the steering movement in the following procedure .
?
By supporting the motorcycle with a jack, lift the front wheel
until it is off the floor by 20 - 30 mm (0.8 - 1 .2 in).
?
Check to make sure that the cables and wire harnesses are
properly routed .
? With the front wheel in the straight ahead state, hitch the
spring scale (special tool) on one handlebar grip end as
shown in the figure and read the graduation when the handlebar
starts moving . Do the same on the other grip end .
Initial force : 200 - 500 grams
09940-92720 : Spring scale
? If the initial force read on the scale when the handlebar starts
turning is either too heavy or too light, adjust it till it satisfies
the specification .
1) First, loosen the front fork upper clamp bolts, handlebar clamp
bolts (only SV650S), steering stem head nut and steering
stem lock nut, and then adjust the steering stem nut by loosening
or tightening it .
2) Tighten the steering stem lock nut, stem head nut and front
fork upper clamp bolts to the specified torque and re-check
the initial force with the spring scale according to the previously
described procedure .
3) If the initial force is found within the specified range, adjustment
has been completed .
 

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davidro said:
Yes, it was a bit jerky, it does not require much pressure on the bars to change direction.  Then again, I'm a new rider so perhaps I just need to have a lighter touch.  But to me having a bit more tension on the bars would help a bit.
OK, it was the ord "jerky" that threw me- most people would call that "light". One thing to check, are the top of your forks sticking through the top yokes at all? Is the rear raised (don't know if you've had it from new or not) It's common for people to lower the front or raise the rear to speed up the steering, but for a newer rider that could make it quick to the point of being unstable. (or, if you turn it around, if I ride a standard SV now I always run really wide in the first corner, because I expect it to turn in like mine)
 

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Hmm. I have to be honest, I don't think a damper is really your solution. Yes, it'll fix your problem, but if you have it firm enough to do that it'll probably give you issues elsewhere. No offence meant here, but I think you're trying to fix a software (pilot) problem with hardware. If you can get through the problem yourself, you'll be able to start really making use of the SV's quick handling (or not making use of it when you don't want to, which is your problem now)

It'll come with experience, and if you fous on it, it could come very quick.
 

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Northwind said:
Hmm. I have to be honest, I don't think a damper is really your solution. Yes, it'll fix your problem, but if you have it firm enough to do that it'll probably give you issues elsewhere. No offence meant here, but I think you're trying to fix a software (pilot) problem with hardware. If you can get through the problem yourself, you'll be able to start really making use of the SV's quick handling (or not making use of it when you don't want to, which is your problem now)

It'll come with experience, and if you fous on it, it could come very quick.
+1 best steering damper is a calm loose pilot, realax and learn to countersteer properly.
 
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