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Discussion Starter #1
My bike was knocked down and the handlebar was bent, which I've since replaced with a stock one. However. the steering is still not straight. When the bike is going straight, the left grip is about 10 degrees below the level of the right grip.

I doubt the forks are bent but something definetely moved out of its place. I have read some messages advising to loosen the stem nuts (?) and/or triple clamp nuts (?) and either hitting a wall (! ?? !) or trying to straighten the steering while holding the front wheel between legs.

What is the correct procedure for this? I would appreciate it if somebody could explain step by step.

Thanks a lot.

Oktay
 

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I had a situation much like that, the solution was simply to undo pretty much everything (with the front end supported!) and wiggle it about. Not very technical I know :)
 

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Support the front end so the front tire is off the ground. Don't hang it from anything on the front end. Loosen the upper and lower triple clamp pinch bolts on one side of the bike (left or right). Bump the tire left and right smartly with the palm of your hand. Retorque the pinch bolts. Check it out.

Most of the time what has happened is that one of the fork tubes has twisted in the triple clamps. Loosening one side of the triple clamps and bumping the tire will usually pop things back into shape. If this doesn't work, do it again, this time loosening the large nut on top of the upper triple clamp.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies guys. I do have a few questions if you don't mind. First of all, I have a centerstand. Do you think this is sufficient support to lift the front wheel? It does come off the floor just a little bit such that I can turn the wheel with little force.

Second. how can I identify the triple clamp pinch bolts? I thought the triple clamp was what the handlebar attaches to.? Are we talking about the two huge bolts at the top end of the fork tubes? (This is primarily a second language thing for me. Sorry)

I kind of have an idea about what I have to do but I want to be as prepared as possible so there are no surprises.

Thanks.

Oktay
 

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First, go to socalsvriders.org or sv650.org and download a shop manual.

You can check the alignment quickly with two yardsticks. Rest one across the tubes just above the dustcaps. Hold the other one a few inches further up the tubes. The two yardsticks should be aligned with one another. If the forks are twisted the ends of the yardsticks will be out of alignment.

The triple clamps hold the upper fork tubes. When you drop the bike the two clamps sometimes are twisted out of alignment relative to one another. If you look where the tubes pass through the triple clamps you will see that there are pinch bolts with allen heads. if you release one of the fork tubes you can usually bump the triples back into alignment. You will need allen head sockets and a torque wrench. The triples must be done correctly, they are the steering. If you have a centerstand you can usually use a small bottle jack under the front of the engine to get the weight off the front wheel.

The big nut in the center of the triple clamps holds the upper clamp against the headset. If it is too tight then the triples won't rotate relative to one another. The two large hex heads at the top of the forks hold the springs in the tubes. The shop manual has a good procedure.
 

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Also look at the height of the fork tubes over teh triples and retourque all the pinch bolts to 16 ft. lbs I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks again. I will acquire the proper allen head socket and give it a try right away. I will let you guys know how it goes. Thanks.

Oktay
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I followed the steps you guys posted tonight and finally adjusted the steering. I actually seem to have overcompensated a little bit making the wheel face the other side slightly because it's a bit hard to tell when it's 100% straight, but it's already much better and I know how to fix it. Finally my bike is road worthy again.

Thanks a bunch.

oktay
 

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And thank you for posting your success. Most times folks with problems just go away, so I never know if they fixed the problem or not, or how they finally fixed the problem.
 
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