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Discussion Starter #1
In NYC, it finally snowed a decent amount. Not alot of snow, 6inches. This morning I got up and squeezed through the motorcycles in the garage to get my shovel. Shoveled a small path down the driveway incase I wanted to take one of the bikes out. Then shoveled the front of the house clean.

While shoveling, my neighbor goes on his porch to smoke a cigarette. So I bring up if he's going to shovel his sidewalk. "Nah, it's too cold out." That's cause you're smoking your cigarette in your pajamas.

I look around and with the exception of a guy accross the street, no one shoveled. In order to walk to the bus stop, I had to walk in the street cause it was the only place clear to walk.

I know we all don't like to shovel, but I take pride in keeping something that is mine clear of snow. Plus it keep me clear from getting sued if someone busts their as5 on my property.

Anyone else feel the same?
 

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hahaha i just hire a landscaper
 

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Discussion Starter #4
You have to wait for the guy to come by.

Edit: It doesn't snow all that often and I don't have the space for a snow blower. Also my house isn't all that large that shoveling would take me more than 10 mins.

Still I feel that people need to clear the front of their houses of snow. Whatever the means, if it gets cleared, fine.
 

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SV Hadder
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for the record, cleaning the snow off OPENS you to liability, and does not protect you from it.
 

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You have to wait for the guy to come by.

Edit: It doesn't snow all that often and I don't have the space for a snow blower. Also my house isn't all that large that shoveling would take me more than 10 mins.

Still I feel that people need to clear the front of their houses of snow. Whatever the means, if it gets cleared, fine.
I fully agree. People should take more pride in what they own. They should stop being lazy and start doing some work.
 

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for the record, cleaning the snow off OPENS you to liability, and does not protect you from it.
How does that work? Not trying to be a smart ass, just would like to know.
 

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I'm pretty sure it's a city ordinance where I live that you have to clear the snow off of your property. If not, the city comes and snowblows it and sticks you with a huge bill. I don't see how this could result in you being liable when you are doing what the city ordinance is requiring you to do.
 

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+1

When I used to live somewhere with a sidewalk in the city we were required by a city ordinance to plow our walks, I think they gave us a day after it snowed before we were ticketed though?
 

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yeah just like the last 2...

umm what??
I would guess that if ice forms on the sidewalk where you just shoveled, the sidewalk would be more slippery than just pure powder. I still live in a condo though; other folks shovel for me right now.
 

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SV Hadder
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Leaving the snow where it fell keeps it in the "act of god/nature" realm. When you make an effort to clear it, you legally take responsibility for the conditions on your property.

IE, you put salt down and it causes ice to form- you can be held liable.
 

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I live in a complex they do it for me. Usually around 4 am that part sucks my dogs go nuts when they clear my stairs ends up waking the baby.... I hate snow!
 

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Leaving the snow where it fell keeps it in the "act of god/nature" realm. When you make an effort to clear it, you legally take responsibility for the conditions on your property.

IE, you put salt down and it causes ice to form- you can be held liable.
it all comes down to who has the better lawyer depending on the situation, you could be held liable in either case

if your talking about your private home, I think clearing your walkways opens you up to liability, if your talking a business, there is an expectation that you make your property accessable
 

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Leaving the snow where it fell keeps it in the "act of god/nature" realm. When you make an effort to clear it, you legally take responsibility for the conditions on your property.

IE, you put salt down and it causes ice to form- you can be held liable.
Which is trumped by the law saying that you have to clear your sidewalks within a certain amount of time or else the city starts fining you. I'm sure some places don't have these laws, but I've had them everywhere I've lived.
 

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They made such a big deal about the storm. We were supposed to get like 6-8 inches, most snow in years here... and we're luck if we got 3 inches. Not only that, but it's only 35 degrees, but with the sun out everything is melting ;D
 

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SV Hadder
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it all comes down to who has the better lawyer depending on the situation, you could be held liable in either case

if your talking about your private home, I think clearing your walkways opens you up to liability, if your talking a business, there is an expectation that you make your property accessable
yes, this discussion was over private property. I agree, in a civil suit, it would depend on a lot of factors.

Which is trumped by the law saying that you have to clear your sidewalks within a certain amount of time or else the city starts fining you. I'm sure some places don't have these laws, but I've had them everywhere I've lived.
Legally, yes, you would be required to shovel, but that doesn't remove the possibility of a law suit should trouble arise.
 

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In Canada we have things that go down the sidewalk and blow the snow off for you...

Nobody shovels their sidewalk, hah!
 

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I'm so glad I live in SoCal now. It was 80 degrees here yesterday.

I grew up in upstate NY, don't miss it at all.
 
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