Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm sending my bike in for 4 Year / 7000 mile service in a week or two (George Dean's in Seattle).

I've already ordered Galfer front brake kit, lines (non-stock routing) and HH pads.

I haven't done much wrenching on my bike yet, and I don't have a front stand either. Otherwise, I am comfortable with light maintenance chores and have changed front brake pads on a car once.

So, should I do it myself, or pay for the labor to let the shop do it? :)

Thanks for the advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
have you ever bled your brakes??

if you have then definetely do it yourself.

if you have lots of time do it yourself. i find working on teh brakes is tedius and kinda painful. the bleeding part mostly. you need an extra set of hands or a vacumme pump or something like that.

it's not techincally challenging. and i guess it would be fun the first time.

plus, i would NEVER let any garage work on my bike. that's half the fun. every year i get alittle bit deeper into the bike until none of it is a mystery anymore. i plan to get into the motor a bit this winter and see how that treats me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,347 Posts
Pads, sure. But bleeding new lines is a PITA. It's not hard, but it can be very frustrating, especially if you don't have any of the assorted hardware people use to make the job easier. You can do it for ages and get no result, or you can get it in seconds, just doing the exact same thing. I don't like doing it myself, it's just a hassle. So I got a Mityvac, makes it painless.

I'm not saying don't do it, just that it's not always a load of fun to do. Still, it's a good skill to aquire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
Just do it. I did the exact same thing around Christmas. Just give yourself some time and do not let the brake fluid touch any paint. Cover the whole front in towles and rags.

A second person to help you bleed the brakes would make it easier but you can do it yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
725 Posts
You can do it. If you want, use the money you would have spent on labor for a mighty vac or similar or some other tools. Follow the manual if you have one. If you can find a syringe at a parts store, you can use it to suck the fluid out of the master cylinder before you start disassembly. You can also use it to fill the brakes lines from the bleeder on the caliper. This forces fluid in from the bottom up and pushes the air out ahead of the fluid. If you get all through and are having a hard time getting all the air out of the system, try letting the bike sit over night with the brake lever held back toward the grip with a bungy cord. This will let some air bubble up out of the system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well, long story short, they are done, and they seem to work pretty well. Not a dramatic improvement, but I think I've noticed a little bit better feel.

Long story...

I couldn't get the left brake line to flow any fluid. Really weird. So, I e-mailed Galfer and they sent a brand new set out right away. Very cool customer service! Turns out hte left brake line was clogged. I couldn't even get any air to flow throught it, much less fluid.

New lines arrived, I installed them, added and bled new brake fluid. Done. Not too bad a job.

Thanks for all the advice.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top