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What should I look for? I am curious as to the quirks of the various models of SV650 through the years. Could someone approximate how much I would be spending for a used SV of about a 2000 model bone-stock. Please help your fellow SV enthusiast become knowledgeable about these bikes, and not get screwed when I buy one. Thanks.
 

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you should look for another bike as a beginner bike. a decent used ex500 or something along those lines. you're gonna drop it and you're not going to want a nicer bike then. the ex500 will also be more forgiving for you to learn on for a year or two before buying the sv.
 
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I am not new to riding at all, done a little bit on a dirtbike, etc. So I would be able to handle the SV as a beginner bike, so what kinds of things would I be looking for? Cost, features, etc for a 2000. Thanks.
 

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drew03cmc said:
I am not new to riding at all, done a little bit on a dirtbike, etc. So I would be able to handle the SV as a beginner bike, so what kinds of things would I be looking for? Cost, features, etc for a 2000. Thanks.
i'd suggest doing a search on here for very recent threads on dirtbike to street conversions. i dont ride dirt, but concensus says that just cause you ride dirt don't mean you can ride street.

get a nice simple beginners bike and take the msf course. ride it, drop it, learn it - then "upgrade" to an sv in a year or two
 
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stranger said:
i'd suggest doing a search on here for very recent threads on dirtbike to street conversions. i dont ride dirt, but concensus says that just cause you ride dirt don't mean you can ride street.

get a nice simple beginners bike and take the msf course. ride it, drop it, learn it - then "upgrade" to an sv in a year or two
I like your thinking! LOL. What would you recommend for a beginner's bike? I am shopping around Christmas time to pick one up! Thanks stranger!
 

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if its in very good condition with low miles expect to pay close to 3k for one. Many will have been dropped at least once. Good luck. You can try cycletrader, and check the papers. I really do see quite a few SVs out there on the road. I know of a few sellers who sold theirs within days of listing them so they go really quick. I hope you are near a bike loving nexus so you can get first dibs. I found that dealers are stealers when it comes to used bikes. There are quite a few fair ones out there, just beware. Also look out for tracked bikes. These bikes have been thrashed pretty well. SVs hold up pretty good considering, but tracked bikes will more than likely have a few mechanical issues. Look for safety wiring.
 
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Spirit of Bunny said:
if its in very good condition with low miles expect to pay close to 3k for one. Many will have been dropped at least once. Good luck. You can try cycletrader, and check the papers. I really do see quite a few SVs out there on the road. I know of a few sellers who sold theirs within days of listing them so they go really quick. I hope you are near a bike loving nexus so you can get first dibs. I found that dealers are stealers when it comes to used bikes. There are quite a few fair ones out there, just beware. Also look out for tracked bikes. These bikes have been thrashed pretty well. SVs hold up pretty good considering, but tracked bikes will more than likely have a few mechanical issues. Look for safety wiring.
I am not against a bike that has been dropped once or twice. I would love to find one for a decent price around me (Kansas City). Thanks for the input. Keep it coming.
 

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drew03cmc said:
I like your thinking! LOL. What would you recommend for a beginner's bike? I am shopping around Christmas time to pick one up! Thanks stranger!
look for a used ex500 of gs500. i had a 91 ex500 that was great to learn on. dropped it a few times, replaced the signal covers a bunch. was glad i didn't have a newer bike.

got it for a grand - new tires and basic work and some miles - sold it for 1500.
 
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stranger said:
look for a used ex500 of gs500. i had a 91 ex500 that was great to learn on. dropped it a few times, replaced the signal covers a bunch. was glad i didn't have a newer bike.

got it for a grand - new tires and basic work and some miles - sold it for 1500.
Do you have pics or anything of one of those bikes? I would love to find a bike to learn on. Thanks for the input stranger!
 

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stranger said:
you should look for another bike as a beginner bike. a decent used ex500 or something along those lines. you're gonna drop it and you're not going to want a nicer bike then. the ex500 will also be more forgiving for you to learn on for a year or two before buying the sv.
I disagree. I just bought a 2000 SV in May as my first street bike. I paid $2150 (~18k miles), but I had to do quite a bit of work off the bat (new tires, new air cleaner, new plugs). Bike had been dropped a couple of times, but it was still clean overall. Since that time, I've done a TON of work, but most of that could be listed as optional.

I don't think the SV is too much for a beginner. Just use good sense. The SV has enough power to pull me back in the seat, but I've never felt like it would get away from me. I also think the SV is a forgiving bike, in that it has so much torque all the time that you don't have to be particularly finicky about gear selection. It also stops in a hurry.

I'm far from an expert on bikes, but I have been on a handful of street bikes this year and the SV is *by far* the most fun. I would be afraid that if you tool around on a Ninja 500 or so, you might not realize just how much fun two wheels can be.
 

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psmoss said:
I don't think the SV is too much for a beginner. Just use good sense. The SV has enough power to pull me back in the seat, but I've never felt like it would get away from me. I also think the SV is a forgiving bike, in that it has so much torque all the time that you don't have to be particularly finicky about gear selection. It also stops in a hurry.

I'm far from an expert on bikes, but I have been on a handful of street bikes this year and the SV is *by far* the most fun. I would be afraid that if you tool around on a Ninja 500 or so, you might not realize just how much fun two wheels can be.
I chopped down this quote a bit to give examples of why I disagree with this (strictly opinion).

1) People have been saying the SV is a good beginner's bike as long as you use good sense..... The good sense part is why it's not recommended as a first bike. You need to learn what a bike can do before you put a 650cc v-twin between your legs

2)"The SV has enough power to pull me back in the seat, but I've never felt like it would get away from me." Ummmm.... Person new to street bikes + above quote= back seat, then street, then repair work to bike and body

3)" It also stops in a hurry." + someone not used to the grip of the asphalt or the weight of a street bike=potential trouble.

and I'm not sure I'm taking this the right way but

"I would be afraid that if you tool around on a Ninja 500 or so, you might not realize just how much fun two wheels can be." ??? ??? ??? Is this to mean someone on a ex500 or other smaller bike won't have as much fun as they would on an sv??? I strongly object to that thinking. (if this isn't the way it was intended, please clarify)

Please, Please, PLEASE stop referring the SV as a beginner bike to those who have little to no experience whatsoever. The MSF instructors should be the ones that refer a bike and I remember them saying the SV was a little much for a beginner bike. I realize folks tell people that all you need is maturity and a steady mind, but believe me, you don't know who is on the other end of the monitor and they themselves don't know what trouble they can get into. One bike night, one group ride, one slip up, and they could be on the board telling us about their injuries. The SV is a powerful bike... not as fast as a Gixxer or other 600cc rr's and up, but it's a doozy. Please consider the GS500F (I like the faired version), the Ninja, etc first. Buy used, learn some about bikes and even toy around wrenching on it, then move on to what you'd like next.

above is strictly the author's opinion and should not be taken as law
 

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Buy a used SV and go have some fun. It is a great bike to learn on and you can even take it to the track once you feel comfortable on it. Some people on this board think the SV is is the greatest, most powerful bike ever built. Got news for ya, it's not. Below 7000 rpm, you might as well be riding a 250. Go above 7000 rpm and the fun starts. I use mine for the track because it is so easy to control the power, especially when coming out of a turn. Once you learn the SV, keep it for the track and buy a ZRX for power and comfort.
 

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psmoss said:
I would be afraid that if you tool around on a Ninja 500 or so, you might not realize just how much fun two wheels can be.
why do you ride? for speed? do you look down on people on smaller or slower bikes?

my ex500 was able to get up and go with the best of them. sure it didn't have the quarter mile times or the top speed of a liter, but i was able to ride with my buddies and hit well over the posted speed limit - what more do you need?

as a self described "non-expert", i'd avoid comments like these - they're completely unfounded and baseless.
 

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Nuclear Waste said:
Buy a used SV and go have some fun.  It is a great bike to learn on and you can even take it to the track once you feel comfortable on it.  Some people on this board think the SV is is the greatest, most powerful bike ever built. Got news for ya, it's not.  Below 7000 rpm, you might as well be riding a 250.  Go above 7000 rpm and the fun starts.  I use mine for the track because it is so easy to control the power, especially when coming out of a turn. Once you learn the SV, keep it for the track and buy a ZRX for power and comfort.
This is as idiotic a statement as I've seen on this board in some time. Clearly Nuclear Waste has never been on a 250. The SV has balls below 7,000 that no 250 will ever have. I put thousands of miles on my wife's 250 Ninja and let me tell you that while pitifully slow, it was an absolute riot to ride on curvy roads.
 
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Drew if you want to go for a 500 there is one for sale in the for sale section for i think 1700 and looks nice.  
 

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stranger said:
why do you ride? for speed? do you look down on people on smaller or slower bikes?
For fun. No. No.

Primary reasons I like the SV: torque, handling.

as a self described "non-expert", i'd avoid comments like these - they're completely unfounded and baseless.
Let's see, I've been on an ancient CB100, a Nighthawk 250, a Nighthawk 750, a DR250S, a KLR650, my 2000 SV650, and Benda's 2003 SV650.

The SV is the most fun of those bikes, in my baseless opinion.
 

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psmoss said:
Let's see, I've been on an ancient CB100, a Nighthawk 250, a Nighthawk 750, a DR250S, a KLR650, my 2000 SV650, and Benda's 2003 SV650.
The SV is the most fun of those bikes, in my baseless opinion.
The most fun... probably. The easiest to learn on??? That's what we're getting at here. I think the SV is a great machine. Not the fastest, but it fits me perfectly. Is that the same for everyone? No. Is it easier to get in trouble on an SV than on a 250 or 500? In my personal opinion, ABSOLUTELY. I have wound out a 500 on accident and it is NOTHING compared to what the SV can do to you if you twist the throttle on accident.

I'm trying my best to look out for other people's safety. With the right mindset, anyone can ride anything. The question is... how do you know you have the right mindset until you've learned it? Hop on an SV without any knowledge of the torque, handling, or even other drivers on the road and you could end up in some serious danger.

Some learn on an SV and do fine. Some learn on GSX-R 1K's and do fine. Just know that your potential for trouble is higher as you move up the power curve. I don't want you, or anyone else for that matter, to end up posting on this board about how they looped their bike or ended up under a guardrail b/c they hopped around a curve too fast on a bike that was a bit too much to handle at first.
 

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theoldguy said:
1) People have been saying the SV is a good beginner's bike as long as you use good sense..... The good sense part is why it's not recommended as a first bike. You need to learn what a bike can do before you put a 650cc v-twin between your legs
I would say this depends on the individual. I would not recommend one as a first bike to your average 16 year old.

2)"The SV has enough power to pull me back in the seat, but I've never felt like it would get away from me." Ummmm.... Person new to street bikes + above quote= back seat, then street, then repair work to bike and body
I approached the SV with a good deal of respect, but not white knuckle fear. IME, I've never had the feeling the front wheel was in danger of accidentally coming up on me.

3)" It also stops in a hurry." + someone not used to the grip of the asphalt or the weight of a street bike=potential trouble.
OTOH, not being able to stop quickly could be a problem.

I see all this stuff as double-edged swords...personally, I've had a 250 dual sport on the street and the lack of power at 55 mph scares me much more than the power of the SV at highway speeds.

Is this to mean someone on a ex500 or other smaller bike won't have as much fun as they would on an sv???
I think it's a real possiblity. Please don't take that as a diss on other, smaller bikes. For me, personally, the two 250s I've been on just didn't do it for me.

Please, Please, PLEASE stop referring the SV as a beginner bike to those who have little to no experience whatsoever.
Again, I think it depends on the individual.

I realize folks tell people that all you need is maturity and a steady mind, but believe me, you don't know who is on the other end of the monitor and they themselves don't know what trouble they can get into.
Excellent point there. I guess the safest statement would be that I don't agree with the blanket statement that the SV is not a beginner bike, and you don't like the blanket statement that the SV is an appropriate beginner bike. :)
 

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psmoss said:
Excellent point there. I guess the safest statement would be that I don't agree with the blanket statement that the SV is not a beginner bike, and you don't like the blanket statement that the SV is an appropriate beginner bike. :)
Very eloquently stated. I couldn't have put it any better. I'd say +1 for you, but I've been +1-ing everyone for the past 47 minutes and I'm pretty sure I've hit you on the way through. :p
 
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