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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There doesn't seem to be a lot of info online about these tires, so I thought I'd take a stab at a mini review that might help if you are thinking about new tires. The Shinko 011 'Verge' (weird name, yes?) is one of their newer offerings and is considered a Sport/Touring tire as compared to their 009 Raven which is more a long wearing Touring version.

I've just taken a Michelin PR2 with 8700 miles off the front and can offer some direct comparisons with the new Shinko. First, let me say I've liked the PR2's a LOT! The front still has legal tread and could easily have gone to 10,000 or more if you are one of those who uses ALL their tire tread. I tend to change tires when they start to feel different, and this tire was beginning to handle a little off compared to when it was new.....plus I had the new tires sitting waiting and was itching to give them a try.



As you can see, the profile of the 011 is more sharply rounded than the PR2, and this is even with a bit of side wear on the Michelin. When it was new, it was very nicely rounded but now has taken more of a triangular profile. If you look closely, you can see the harder compound center standing proud. I tried and tried to get a good picture of it, but my photographic skills are challenged and just couldn't get it to show up. Perhaps some indirect lighting would have worked, but I think you can see it.



Side by side, the Shinko stands proud above the Michelin...even accounting for its' worn out state. The new tire is at least 1/2" taller....maybe a bit more so you folks with SV650's looking for a taller tire to correct the speedo this might be an option. Another interesting difference is the sidewall heights. The PR2's tread wraps around farther and gets closer to the bead. And, holding both dismounted tires really showed the difference in sidewall construction with the Michelin being very thin and flexible while the Shinko very robust by comparison. This might be a disadvantage if you were planning on lots of very high speed running as the thicker carcass would likely run hotter, but should be more durable and resistant to damage out on the road. One fellow actually claimed he ran one flat for a considerable distance to civilization when he picked up a nail!:) I'm kind of liking the sturdy sidewalls as long as they don't make the tire ride harshly.

The rear PR2 on the bike was fresh this spring and will probably live the rest of this season although I do have the mating Shinko here if it should show any reason to need changing earlier.

So....how does the Shinko work? Actually...I'm impressed with it so far after my brief 145 mile ride this morning. Taking it easy on the new tire to get it scrubbed in, which is to say I rode even MORE carefully than I normally do, it surprised me in a couple of ways. First was the responsive handling which I kind of expected seeing the more pointy profile but the bike really changed its' character with this new tire.

The PR2 was always very predictable and linear with pressure on the bars. Add more, get more lean and always very secure and stuck to the road. This Shinko leans the bike over with just the lightest steering pressure and it took me about half the ride to stop oversteering when entering a sharp turn. It really, really wants to turn!

Also, once in a turn if you should want to tighten your line it seems to do it with just a hint of additional pressure whereas the PR2's took a lot more effort to push on over if needed. The biggest change came when I tried braking whilst leaned over and found the Shinko pretty neutral! There is a steep very winding downhill up on the mountain that needs braking the whole way down which used to be a bit of work with the PR2 constantly trying to stand up and needing forced down into the turns. The 011 steered almost like the brakes weren't being used! Very nice.:)

The ride that I was worried about because of the heavy sidewalls turns out to be about the same as the PR2....at least close enough that I didn't notice any difference so I'm calling that OK. They had balanced out with 1/4oz less weight than what the Michelin had taken so the tire seems to be well made and it runs true and very smoothly.

When I got back to the house, the tire was nice and warm (only 65F out) and very soft/sticky feeling. I'm not thinking that traction will be an issue with these, and only the wear an unknown now. My opinion is they are a worthy tire for the SV.:)
 

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Interesting that you are trying the 011 Verge tires.

I've used 3 rear and 2 front 011's. I like them a lot. I have ridden them in all kinds of conditions and they always hooked up great. I can't recall ever having a scare on them. They work very well in the wet.

I agree with your observations on the front tire. I have used quite a few different front tires, and like you, I changed from a PR2 to a Verge front tire. The Verge slices through corners with surgical precision; it's a sharp steering tire that really gets the bike to turn right now.

Here's what I found on wear: with the standard 36R/33F, I got 5000 out of a rear and 4500 out of a front. Shinko needs to harden the compound or put more rubber on the front tire. With 39R/36F, I got 6000 rear and 5300 front. More pressure makes them last a lot longer. YMMV, because the roads I ride are all chip seal and very hard on tires. For comparison, I got 6800 miles on a PR2 rear and 8000 on a PR2 front, using 36/33.

I just installed a Bridgestone 023 on the front yesterday and I kinda miss the knife like handling of the Shinko Verge. I'll get used to the 023, but the Verge was like no other tire for sharp cornering.

I decided to try an 023 because, on sale, they priced out the same as the Verge. I know that people get upwards of 8000 on an 023 front, so I would save some money because of the longer tread life. That's the only reason I didn't get another set of Shinko Verge's, they wear too quickly on the front. Otherwise, I would use them forever and never look back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the info.
prices?
Fronts can be had for $75 and change. http://www.bikebandit.com/shinko-011-verge-radial-motorcycle-tire Rears are $103 for the 160 and $123 for the 180's.

This IS an attempt to save a few bucks...which, in my case is almost $80 vs the PR2's. But, it is also an attempt to find a great performing tire for a good price.

Rock Dodger...your post about the 011's was the only thing that came up when I searched here for info about them. Thanks for the recommendation!:) I'm really, really liking how this front tire feels. If it can make it 6000 miles, that will cover my riding season and I'll put a fresh set on each spring. Supposedly this tire will retain its' handling pretty much intact during its' life...unlike the PR2 which gets squirrelly (IMO) when getting worn down. Some of that is from my inevitable flat spotting, but I'm hoping the sharper profile will take more to make 'dull'.

My first bike was an RD400C cafe with K81 Dunlops on it. Talk about a sharp handling bike! Those tires were literally triangle shaped and turned by thinking about it. This 011 reminds me of that feeling...which is good.:)
 

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Fronts can be had for $75 and change. http://www.bikebandit.com/shinko-011-verge-radial-motorcycle-tire Rears are $103 for the 160 and $123 for the 180's.

This IS an attempt to save a few bucks...which, in my case is almost $80 vs the PR2's. But, it is also an attempt to find a great performing tire for a good price.

Rock Dodger...your post about the 011's was the only thing that came up when I searched here for info about them. Thanks for the recommendation!:) I'm really, really liking how this front tire feels. If it can make it 6000 miles, that will cover my riding season and I'll put a fresh set on each spring. Supposedly this tire will retain its' handling pretty much intact during its' life...unlike the PR2 which gets squirrelly (IMO) when getting worn down. Some of that is from my inevitable flat spotting, but I'm hoping the sharper profile will take more to make 'dull'.

My first bike was an RD400C cafe with K81 Dunlops on it. Talk about a sharp handling bike! Those tires were literally triangle shaped and turned by thinking about it. This 011 reminds me of that feeling...which is good.:)
Yes, the Verge tires handle great all the way to the bitter end. I liked the PR2's except the last 1000 miles. The soft "edge rubber" looked like it had melted, while the center section had quite a bit of tread. Like you said, I would notice a "falling off" the center section onto the sides when the tire became worn. It was squirrely!

You'll find that the Verge keeps a more round profile throughout the tire's life, unlike the PR2's, if you ride a lot of twisties and corner hard. From the wear I've seen on PR2's, they seem to be designed mainly for straight roads and limited usage on twisties.

Another thing, watch the wear bars! They're located over to the side and when the tread gets down to the wear bar, even on one side, keep an eye on the center of the tire, because it's about to be out of rubber. Over the weekend, I put the bike up on stands and carefully looked over the tread. I could see about a half dozen tiny holes in the rubber down to the carcass. I just left the bike on the stands and got a new tire from the basement. I put the new tire on, pronto.

You're right; it doesn't take much weight to balance the Verge tires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You realize the Shinko 011 is only "W" speed rated... just sayin
Oh! I just checked http://shinkotireusa.com/product/product.php?id=70 and am pretty comfortable with a 'W' as that is 168 mph. You've got an awful fast 650 to worry about these tires, and I can't see my 1K doing that speed either.

Also, tire speed ratings are done at full rated load. The 120/70-17 is 520 lbs while the 180/55-17 is 805 lbs. So, if I balance things right, I can put about 870 lbs on the bike without overloading the tires. Of course, the GVWR isn't anywhere near that...so we're pretty safe.:)
 

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Meh.

My dad was looking into these for his Concours, and found that 3000-4000 miles was typical and the 009 lasted slightly longer than the 011. That's about half the life of a PR2 on the same bike for not much less money.
 

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Oh! I just checked http://shinkotireusa.com/product/product.php?id=70 and am pretty comfortable with a 'W' as that is 168 mph. You've got an awful fast 650 to worry about these tires, and I can't see my 1K doing that speed either.

Also, tire speed ratings are done at full rated load. The 120/70-17 is 520 lbs while the 180/55-17 is 805 lbs. So, if I balance things right, I can put about 870 lbs on the bike without overloading the tires. Of course, the GVWR isn't anywhere near that...so we're pretty safe.:)
All that is true, but there's more to speed ratings than top rated speed. There's construction to be considered. A "Z" rated tyre is constructed to a higher standard than lesser speed ratings, hence the reason the 011 is a little cheaper.

That being said, I still might consider these in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The 011 IS a 'Z' rated tire. Says right on the sidewall 120/70ZR17. It means the tire has a capability over 149 mph. The 'W' is a supplemental rating of just how much OVER 149 it is good for, in this case 168 mph.
 

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Meh.

My dad was looking into these for his Concours, and found that 3000-4000 miles was typical and the 009 lasted slightly longer than the 011. That's about half the life of a PR2 on the same bike for not much less money.
The Verge isn't a good choice for a Concours, Goldwing or any other "two wheeled car". ;) A better choice would be a Bridgestone BT-023GT, made especially for heavy touring bikes. By the same token, a BT-016, Pilot Power or other sport tire wouldn't be a good idea on massive touring bikes.

When or if Shinko revises the front tire to give about 40% more mileage, I wouldn't hesitate to use them again. If the 023's that I'm going to use don't work as well as I hope, I'll probably go back to the Verge.
 

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Aaaand 9 years later,
I just put a new set of 011's on my Gen1. With the caveat that new tires always feel better than old ones, these things rock. Dead neutral, smooth, easy turning, and still 100 bucks less than the Metzler Sport Tech's that were on it. The Metzler's were great when they were new also, but the inevitable flattening of the rear profile was starting to make them feel all weird - down to the wear bars in back while the front still looked pretty good.
 

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^ good timing, positive reviews of this tire bear repeating, I think.
After 10 years I'm still using the Shinko Verge 011's.
Still love them.
 
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