Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in october I purchased a 99 SV650 used for racing. I just fixed it up and got it running well. Yesterday I got the tag and rode it to work and just today I rode it to school and around town some more. About an hour ago I decided to take a little ride in my neighborhood which is out in the country. I was going a little fast but not anything crazy (35-45 mph). When I was taking the final turn before I got back to my house I made a classic mistake of not looking through the turn all the way, along with not braking enough, and ended up hitting grass on the opposite side of the road. The bike flipped and skid on its right side, I also flipped and skid down the road, getting some nice road rash. Thankfully I'm alright, but my brand-new-to-me bike is looking bad :( The tank is badly dented on the right side, the right clip on and headlight was ripped off with no chance of salvaging it, and the front brake lines are ruined. Mostly I'm upset because I'm a brand new rider and I already crashed on my second day. I love motorcycles and I want to fix mine up and take more time to practice before riding again. Can anyone give me some tips on where to start with my bike? I can post pictures. The bike was running on its side for a few seconds before it shut off and I cant start it to see if it still runs because of the busted switch. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks Guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,871 Posts
Start by fixing the parts that are broken and absolutly nessicary to drive the bike. :thumbsup:

Yea, bit of a smart ass, but it is the truth. I can't tell you anything specific without more information, but you know what parts are broken. I certainly imagine the bike will run with out an issue once you have the button fixed. If you aren't in a hurry, look on e-bay and on here for someone parting out a bike. Seeing as it was a race bike, the clip on may be woodcraft or some other aftermarket peice (especially considering you seem to have a naked version with clip ons :dontknow: ). Post a pic if you aren't sure. I would imagine you will want to replace it with what was lost so it matches the other side.

So, obviously you need a new clip on, brake lines, and headlight. How is the throttle assembly? Throttle cables? If the brake lines are wrecked.... your cables are right there too. Sounds like you need a new starter switch. Brake lever? May still be useable even if broke, it's your call. You can run with a dented tank, as long as it isn't leaking.

Don't know what else to tell you dude. Pics might help, but you should be able to tell what is broke.

As for you: (the important part)
Sorry to hear of the off. Crashing always sucks. In the grand scheme, you got off easy. Glad you are OK. As you are working on fixing the bike, seak professional training (i.e. MSF course) Sounds like you had a SUPER rookie mistake. Get control of that baby before getting back on the road. Next time there might be a car comming in the other dirrection instead of a grassy ditch. Know what I mean.
Also as you are ordering the parts for your bike... order gear and wear it. If you had a jacket and pants and they just road up giving you road rash... that's tough, I am sorry to hear it. Otherwise, my previous statement stands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,374 Posts
msf.org is a good place to start
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I managed to remove the starter housing and start the bike by touching the wires. Still runs alright it seems. I actually passed the MSF course but the thing is, all the MSF stuff is preformed at slower speeds... When your going into a turn and you dont know how much you need to brake in order to take that turn safely, its tough. Im glad the bike is running and I defiantly want to seek some training courses still. I really want a new tank since this one is dented on both sides now (PO also dropped it on the other side when racing). The major dissapointment for me is that I have to drive my truck for awhile now. haha. So the engine seems okay, Hopefully all I'll need is the clip on, brake lines, switch housing, headlight, one headlight bracket and one turn signal. Then a little training to put some pride back on my man card hahaha. Hopefully that will work out.
Start by fixing the parts that are broken and absolutly nessicary to drive the bike. :thumbsup:

Yea, bit of a smart ass, but it is the truth. I can't tell you anything specific without more information, but you know what parts are broken. I certainly imagine the bike will run with out an issue once you have the button fixed. If you aren't in a hurry, look on e-bay and on here for someone parting out a bike. Seeing as it was a race bike, the clip on may be woodcraft or some other aftermarket peice (especially considering you seem to have a naked version with clip ons :dontknow: ). Post a pic if you aren't sure. I would imagine you will want to replace it with what was lost so it matches the other side.

So, obviously you need a new clip on, brake lines, and headlight. How is the throttle assembly? Throttle cables? If the brake lines are wrecked.... your cables are right there too. Sounds like you need a new starter switch. Brake lever? May still be useable even if broke, it's your call. You can run with a dented tank, as long as it isn't leaking.

Don't know what else to tell you dude. Pics might help, but you should be able to tell what is broke.

As for you: (the important part)
Sorry to hear of the off. Crashing always sucks. In the grand scheme, you got off easy. Glad you are OK. As you are working on fixing the bike, seak professional training (i.e. MSF course) Sounds like you had a SUPER rookie mistake. Get control of that baby before getting back on the road. Next time there might be a car comming in the other dirrection instead of a grassy ditch. Know what I mean.
Also as you are ordering the parts for your bike... order gear and wear it. If you had a jacket and pants and they just road up giving you road rash... that's tough, I am sorry to hear it. Otherwise, my previous statement stands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
One thing that I can recommend to you about speed in corners is to pick a corner that has an open line of sight, not blind and start off slowly through the corner, no brakes or throttle change. Turn around and go through the same corner going in the other direction at the same speed. Then, turn around again and slightly increase your speed. Maybe only a couple of mph or even one. Keep repeating this looking through the corner. You will start to observe that as the speed increases, you will need to make faster and stronger steering inputs to keep the bike on the same line through the turn. A big mistake for novices is to fixate and not look through the turn and also, to fail to recognize that as you increase your speed you need to increase your steering inputs to lean the bike over further to trace the same line. In addition, the faster you travel, the faster and stronger your braking inputs have to be. It takes repetition to get your mind to slow down the speed and to pick the correct turn in points and amount of steering input. Time on the bike with practice drills will help. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I was going a little fast but not anything crazy (35-45 mph)
I actually passed the MSF course but the thing is, all the MSF stuff is preformed at slower speeds... When your going into a turn and you dont know how much you need to brake in order to take that turn safely, its tough.
As an MSF instructor this is the thing I fear most every time I send new riders out on the road with their shiny silver MSF sticker card. Couple points I want to make here.

1) Good on you for accepting that YOU ****** up. This is the most important part of learning from a mistake imo. Most want to blame the road, the tires, the bike, the weather, the sandwich they had for lunch, etc. You were going to fast and not looking far enough ahead and that's why you crashed.

2) Now it's time to learn. The second part I quoted tells you everything you need to know about how to avoid this in the future. There is NOTHING tough about knowing how fast you can safely take it. When in doubt, you're going too fast. Even if you're going really slow, too fast for the turn is too fast. The BRC definitely touches on this point. The bit about approaching a blind corner and SEE'ing. What do you do? Step 1, slow down. Better to enter it too slow and speed up later.

3) You've been riding for two days and you're deciding that a little fast is nothing crazy, this was your first mistake. Actual speed isn't important, nor is speed vs. speed limit. It's all about your confidence and skill level and when all is said and done, you were riding above your head. Back it down, figure out what you're doing, add speed when you have the skill and confidence to back it up.

Please don't take my comments as a personal bash, I'm not trying to make you feel worse than you already do. It sucks that this happened and thankfully you're ok. Now it's time to learn and make sure it doesn't happen again. (FWIW I went off the road myself as a newb, and off the track many times as an experienced rider. Fortunately I kept the bike upright most of the time). Get the bike fixed up and safe to ride (don't worry about cosmetics right now), get to a big parking lot and practice your skills. And don't think that just because the BRC is taught at sub 20 that the skills don't apply to the road. Remember the box? Remember how much easier is was to get through that when you turned your head? Remember the weave and how much easier it was when you looked down range? Remember your comment about not looking far enough ahead? Starting to see the connection? :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,897 Posts
Stop looking at the ground and look ahead (raise your vision).

Read the Lee Parks book Throttle Control and watch the Keith Code video (and book) Twist of the Wrist II and listen to soofle616.

Also, wear some gear!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,284 Posts
all good advice and there is nothing much to add except to lean harder - it probably would have been better to lean too far and low side than run off the road... trust your tires. Also, I fixed the book title for you.

Stop looking at the ground and look ahead (raise your vision).

Read the Lee Parks book Total Control and watch the Keith Code video (and book) Twist of the Wrist II and listen to soofle616.

Also, wear some gear!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
There is an upside... you went down early, before you over-estimated your abilities to the point where you might have gotten really hurt. I write this as I am recovering from my first bike related injury in many years of riding... taking a spill early at a lower speed with minor injuries beats the alternative.

Now mind you, I was doing nearly everything right and I ended up with a broken tibia. First accident and all, required surgery to recover from as well as 3 days in the hospital. I can see how I could have reduced my risk even in my accident in hind sight. I may have even been able to avoid the cager determined to damage either me or my bike, although I have my doubts given the precise details of the accident.

As others have said, slow down, build your skill with the bike slowly... very slowly. Your SV650 is nearly as quick as any bike to road legal speeds and faster than many to 60 MPH. It's not the speed.

If there is anything I can leave you with, it's always have a plan, always be ready for the unexpected, and don't assume anything other than every other driver is on the road to kill you. This will keep you safer, but won't make it safe.

There are two types of riders, those that have been down, and those that will go down. I avoided going down for over 15 years of riding, you lasted two days.... so what. I'd trade injuries in a heart beat! Echoing above, Lee Park's book is full of information you need to know.

M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
There is an upside... you went down early, before you over-estimated your abilities to the point where you might have gotten really hurt. I write this as I am recovering from my first bike related injury in many years of riding... taking a spill early at a lower speed with minor injuries beats the alternative.

Now mind you, I was doing nearly everything right and I ended up with a broken tibia. First accident and all, required surgery to recover from as well as 3 days in the hospital. I can see how I could have reduced my risk even in my accident in hind sight. I may have even been able to avoid the cager determined to damage either me or my bike, although I have my doubts given the precise details of the accident.

As others have said, slow down, build your skill with the bike slowly... very slowly. Your SV650 is nearly as quick as any bike to road legal speeds and faster than many to 60 MPH. It's not the speed.

If there is anything I can leave you with, it's always have a plan, always be ready for the unexpected, and don't assume anything other than every other driver is on the road to kill you. This will keep you safer, but won't make it safe.

There are two types of riders, those that have been down, and those that will go down. I avoided going down for over 15 years of riding, you lasted two days.... so what. I'd trade injuries in a heart beat! Echoing above, Lee Park's book is full of information you need to know.

M
Yeah I read your post a couple days ago. Just one more reminder that when there's a gap between cars, it's for a reason!


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
Yeah I read your post a couple days ago. Just one more reminder that when there's a gap between cars, it's for a reason!


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com App
Honestly, you couldn't see the difference in gap... it was that narrow and not unusual from the gap between other cars given the caterpillar effect from the stop sign down the road another 800 meters. Although just weeks before, a gap provided the clue I needed to keep from getting pasted... because sure enough, the clueless driver pulled right out in front of me... fortunately I was already fully ready to stop. She never did see me.

The only other things I really can imagine having done were moving to the farthest left part of the lane (exposing myself more to oncoming traffic), slowing down even more (was 20-25 mph), and identifying ahead of time where each and every driveway was so that I could have created additional options for myself.

Was ugly and unfortunate. Still there were at least 3 more things I could have done.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
788 Posts
Honestly, you couldn't see the difference in gap... it was that narrow and not unusual from the gap between other cars given the caterpillar effect from the stop sign down the road another 800 meters. Although just weeks before, a gap provided the clue I needed to keep from getting pasted... because sure enough, the clueless driver pulled right out in front of me... fortunately I was already fully ready to stop. She never did see me.

The only other things I really can imagine having done were moving to the farthest left part of the lane (exposing myself more to oncoming traffic), slowing down even more (was 20-25 mph), and identifying ahead of time where each and every driveway was so that I could have created additional options for myself.

Was ugly and unfortunate. Still there were at least 3 more things I could have done.

Mark
I believe you. There's only so much we can give our attention to before moving to the next possible hazard. I wasn't criticizing you in the least.

Yeah hindsight there probably was BUT, those 3 things could have had ripple effects that might or might not have been for the better.


Sent from my iPhone using Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,980 Posts
Don't throw the tank out just because it's dented. A good body man can have it looking like new in no time. My tank looked like a bag of grapes when I bought the bike, and now it looks brand new.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top