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Discussion Starter #1
So I made a bit of a mistake this winter... I live in Washington and unfortunately my bike got exposed to a lot of moisture and rain (despite the trusty ol' cover). I am a college student and didn’t have a place to store it.

So now I am left with an improvement in the weather but some rust on my chain. Its on at least half of the links. I really don’t want to replace it because it only has 1000 miles on it. I am wondering if the rust is a problem that I can ignore and keep on using chain grease. Should I replace it? Looking for anybody’s thoughts here. Thanks!
 

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Carb cleaner, a good wire brush, and some lube. If your chain isn't rusted into postition, you should be able to recover. Just stay on top of RSM and if you ride in the rain be sure to clean your chain at the first chance you get.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Will the carb cleaner damage the o-rings? I was just reading on another forum about Dupunt Teflon Multi-Purpose lube. Anybody know anything about how this stuff works or if it will take any of the rust off?
 

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Are we talking surface rust, or a TON of rust, to where the chain has grown in size? If that's the case, a new chain is not that expensive. Plus, if you are worried about the chain's condition, you can always replace it anyway.

Someone back me up on this, but wouldn't WD-40 work as well as a good general purpose rust-eliminator? I tend to use the stuff for just about anything... and it's really good about cleaning surface rust, and keeping it from coming back.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hey thanks guys.

I do know that WD-40 breaks down grease, which is what keeps those o-rings lubed up. I don't want to put WD-40 on the chain because I don't want anything to get into the o-rings that will damage them.

As for the chain growing, I think that it is only surface rust. The chain doesn't seem to have lost any flexibility.

I know I can buy a new chain (and I already have a chain breaker tool). I just wanted to get some more miles out of this bad boy if possible.
 

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I use carb cleaner, but I don't have an o-ring chain. I'm only talking about surface rust, not build up like what your saying. If you have that you definately need to get a new chain.
 

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I like dumonds chain lube. I have had good luck with that product.
 

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Hey thanks guys.

I do know that WD-40 breaks down grease, which is what keeps those o-rings lubed up. I don't want to put WD-40 on the chain because I don't want anything to get into the o-rings that will damage them.

As for the chain growing, I think that it is only surface rust. The chain doesn't seem to have lost any flexibility.

I know I can buy a new chain (and I already have a chain breaker tool). I just wanted to get some more miles out of this bad boy if possible.

Always remember, safety is paramount! If you think there's any risk involved in riding on that chain, get a new one right away! Plus, it's a helluva lot easier to get a new chain than it is to replace your sprockets... if you wear on those prematurely you have an entirely NEW situation on your hands.

My money is on a new chain... just because of the o-ring issue if nothing else. I know there are cleaners out there that are safe for rubber, but it almost seems like less of a hassle to replace. Why risk it?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Maybe thats what I needed to hear. The only thing is that I'm on a pretty tight budget these days (living the college 'dream'). If I didn't have that to consider, I'd be in the local shop today geting a new one. That being said, I'm always under the impression that safety should come first... Just now always easy to pay for it.
 

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Surface rust?

Dude, just get some steel wool or a red scotchbrite pad.

No need for any solvents or anything.
 

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If it's just surface rust you are wasting money getting a new chain. Give your chain a good cleaning, I use kerosene and a stiff bristled brush. After it's clean use a good quality lube and ride. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Surface rust?

Dude, just get some steel wool or a red scotchbrite pad.

No need for any solvents or anything.
Rad. I can do that.

Also, congrats on SVotM. You've definitely got to be turning heads with that one. I've always thought an SV with a complete fender and rear-seat eliminator was pretty sexy. How did you learn how to do all those mods?
 

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Rad. I can do that.

Also, congrats on SVotM. You've definitely got to be turning heads with that one. I've always thought an SV with a complete fender and rear-seat eliminator was pretty sexy. How did you learn how to do all those mods?
I just started wrenching. Started with my first car. I figured it was pointless to pay someone else to do work I'm capable of doing... so there we go.
 

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Maybe thats what I needed to hear. The only thing is that I'm on a pretty tight budget these days (living the college 'dream'). If I didn't have that to consider, I'd be in the local shop today geting a new one. That being said, I'm always under the impression that safety should come first... Just now always easy to pay for it.
I hear ya there. If you've taken the MSA course, you will know that they stress safety heavily... over anything else. For a good reason, too. I got to experience firsthand what happens when something goes wrong with your bike!

I wouldn't anticipate that surface rust will trash your bike, especially if it's just through the winter. A good lube will probably do the trick for now, I think they usually have some that is a good cleaner type too. Main concern would be uneven wear on the sprocket and too much friction, especially if the rust is building up.
 

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Any surface rust on the rollers will be removed pretty ****ed fast as soon as the bike starts moving.

Take a look at your chain. If the side plates are rusty, but the rollers are shiny, you're fine.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks everyone for all your help. That makes me feel a lot better about the next step.

again, eisenfaust- seriously rad bike.
 

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Will the carb cleaner damage the o-rings? I was just reading on another forum about Dupunt Teflon Multi-Purpose lube. Anybody know anything about how this stuff works or if it will take any of the rust off?

Dupont is a lubricant, not a cleaner.
 

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Grunge brush or toothbrush and some kerosine and the chain should shine like new. IMO I would avoid any type of wire brush, you don't want to run the risk of hitting the o-rings and possibly damaging the chain.
 

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I use simple green but yeah give the chain a good thorough cleaning with a grundge brush or better yet steel wool (or a metal bristled brush)...

If it comes off, great...

If not, next thing you could try is removing it for a more thorough cleaning.

Lastly, how many miles on the sprockets (you say 1000 on the chain)? Sprocket and chain set is pricey but just a chain shouldnt be TO bad but yeah I know in college every dollar counts...

But definetly clean it before jumping on a new chain and spending your hard earned cash.
 
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