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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK I picked up a 03 sv1ks, with just 3,000 miles on it, was a spur of the moment deal, and I grabbed it based on just the price, and condition it appeared in

I have owned a bunch of bikes over the yrs, with my last two street bikes being a 1999 GSXR750, and then a 2001 GSX 750 Katana

and I don't know if its me and my memory, but they all seemed a lot more sporty, quicker, than this SV,
I am not complaining
just wondering if this bike is running correctly or not
I cannot find any problems minus a little tick I hear , but from what I read on this bike, some are known to have that sound
it revs fine, maybe a little slow to me being a MX bike rider mostly
and the GSXR I know was a different breed of bike, but the katana, even reved a lot faster based on my memory
I mean both bikes would lift the front wheel in second third gear if you got on it hard
this SV seems to just not have that power with how it rev's up
I am sure it has the power to lift the front wheel, but it doesn't seem to have the ability to do so with how it runs as is
I amm not looking to do wheelie's or the likes, again just wondering if something is off
as going up 250 cc's and quite a bid of HP ,iand ts actually lighter than the old Katana I had
makes me wonder if something could be off
I know its way quieter than both of the other bikes I had before this, so maybe its part of the mind games, but just doesn't seem what a 1000 shpuld be>
I have plans to do new plugs over the winter, as I have no idea how long these have been in the bike, previous owner only rode the bike 2-3 times a yr since getting it, thus low miles!
but is there any suggestions on things to check ??
I am not looking to build a race bike, so not looking for mod 's really, its plenty fast for what I do, but ??
but would like to have it running right if its not

thanks again for any suggestions and idea's
 

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Welcome to the forum. FWIW, wheelies are not necessarily a good indicator of performance. Have you done the normal new/used bike stuff? Carb sync, oil & air filter changes, plug check, tires (age, wear, damage), brakes/fluid, suspension settings, fork oil, etc? 3k is low for a valve check, but if you hear noises or suspect poor performance, it might be worthwhile.

The SV s/b quicker than the Katana, probably a bit less so than the GSXR. Unless you rode the bikes last week, I'd suspect that memory is playing tricks on you. Putting the bikes on the track with a clock might be a good idea to either confirm your suspicions or belay them.

If you haven't ridden for a while, it might be a good time to update your skills as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks, the bike is fuel injected so no carbs
didn't do an oil change yet going to before parking for winter in about two weeks, same goes with spark plugs
as for memopry I am sure that is part of the problem, but doesn't explain to me the lack of , for a better word, pulling force, wheelie's when getting on it hard like both of my older bikes did
as for track time, I have never driven a sport bike on a track, none realy any where near me, and I am not looking honestly to do so, although it does sound like fun
I run MX tracks and have for 30+ yrs now, so get the fun of a track

I was looking for fedback on maybe if I have something possibly wrong, and what to look for if so

it could just be it is what it is, and I am maybe having memory issue's
but seat of the pants still says I am lacking maybe some pony's or just slopw reving
 

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It doesn't cost much to have the bike put on a dyno. The numbers you will obtain only relate to your bike on that particular dyno, but the graph and torque values will give you an idea whether something is amiss or not.
 

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The big twins tend to not feel so fast as the I-4's. Just read an article about the first Ducati 750's where the test rider was disgusted with it...didn't feel fast at all, until he pulled into the pits and they showed him the stopwatches. He'd set a lap record! So, going just by feel might not be accurate.

The STV's on these bikes tend to moderate the throttle quite a bit in the lower gears too. Takes big throttle openings to go fast, where conventional carbs or TB's will give you lots more power at light throttle settings. Felt really weird to me...so they are desktop ornaments now.:)

Also.....the fuel pumps tend to get crudded up over time which will slowly starve the engine and reduce power. It happens so slowly that you don't notice it. The engine won't start bogging or outright dying until the pressure is down to 10 psi or so. My bike ran surprisingly well on 20 psi, but getting the full 43 is night and day. Your feelings might be indicative of a fueling problem. There are a couple tests in the manual to help pinpoint it....particularly the flow test. Might be worth a try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks guys
I am going to look into the possibility of the fuel pressures
with my thinking being, that since we here in USA have so much ethanol any more in gas, and well its terrible on carbs in small gas engines that sit over winters, make a geavy varnish like what ever that just screws with them working after a few seasons, found that out from many things I have and most local repair shops
and since I know this bike sat often for so long on same gas , that very well could be the problem
I also, have been mostly a 2 stroke motor guy , and am used to a faster get of and go, come a live bikes I guess, both for real and seat of the pants running
Plus even my snowmobile's are 2 stroke and my one has 220 hp, so it will if it hooks up, want to shot out from under you
so I am sure my other toys are playing with what feel , when I get on this bike, as to what I expect it should have and what I feel it has, just seem off


RecoilRob , you say you replaced the factory STV"s, what exactly do you mean,
and what did you replce them with, and if you don't mind what did doing that run you, and
any other mods have to be made when you swapped them

and I plan to change gearing when these run down, but with winter closing in fast here on me, just looking to see what I can do with what it is now
I again am not looking to make a faster bike, just maybe more responsive , as I think this bike should have all the speed anyone could really use on the road, but a more responsive bike to me is just more fun
and thats what I would like to get if I can, without going crazy on mods
as if I really wanted a more sport bike they already make them in factory form, but they cost you in price of both bike and ins, so happy with this more or less, just wouldn't mind a little quicker get up and go
 

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The Secondary Throttle Valves are a supplemental set of throttle plates above the ones you control. They are run by a servo motor at the whim of the ECU programming. In the higher gears the STV's lag the rider controlled ones by a little bit, in the lower gears it can be a lot. My bike wouldn't wheelie in first gear with a quick roll on from idle. Went quickly for sure, just was very smooth like someone was rolling on the throttle and not whacking it open...like I'd done. Suzuki was trying to make the bike more 'friendly'.:)

They were also there to quell intake noise...which they do pretty well. MUCH louder with them out...even with the stock airbox and snorkel in place. If you want quicker throttle response...the STV's would be the first place to look IMHO.

Costs nothing to remove the plates. Leave the shafts in place as the servo motor works a sensor and the ECU won't be pleased you have mucked about with the mechanism and will set a FI light and go to a limp setting. Not good. If you like the results of the STV removal, you can go further by removing the shafts...but then you must add some electronic wizardry to fool the ECU into thinking every thing is still there. Happily a device exists to do this if you feel the need. $125. Bargain!:)
 

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Yeah, the SV1K isn't a huge power beast, but should at least be similar in performance to what you're comparing it to. The low-end torque would give me the jump on most bikes on track coming out of slow turns, but as soon as we could open up everything passed me on the straights (except sv650s of course haha). Even I4 600s would pull pass me once they spooled up.

The thing about the SV1K and especially my current RC51, is that the torque is deceptive. The RC has this constant, linear torque curve that just doesn't let up. You don't think you're going that fast until you look down at the speedo. The SV also rev's a lot slower I've noticed.
 

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One thing I would suggest to make the bike perform closer to it's true potential is get k &n air filter and desnorkel the air box. These bikes stock are air hogs and the stock setup is restrictive.
 

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well one of the reasons you are having less power wheelies is because the swingarm is longer than most supersport bikes and the shorter your swingarm is the easier the front tire lifts. i can tell you that the sv1000s in good running condition should eat a 750 alive and give a 1000 super sport a hard run for its money until they get to high rpms. i have raced about 6 super sport bikes and the 1000's will come back and pass me at the end but the 750 just eats my vapor trail. and trust me if you want the front wheel to come up then just put it in 1st and slip the clutch like 3000 to 4000 rpms and when you dump the clutch you will be looking at the birds in the sky above you. the sv1000s should out accelerate a supersport off the line and be in the lead until around 4th gear powerband. mine has some upgrades for performance like desnorkle and tank lifters and a TRE unit plus a different sprocket set. dont be afraid to take your engine to high rpms either. there is probably a lot of rpms not being used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
OK guys thanks again for the feedback
I also ordered a K&N filter, as just planned to replace the one on the bike due to odds are it could be original on it, its just a Pm for me I planned to do along with oil /filter, new collant,plugs and such
as for dumping the clutch at 3000 rpm, I still get nothing, at 4k it will lift then just drop right back down
I am not looking to run wheelies on the bike at all, it just like i said seems to rev up slower than expected, and well due to that I just don't feel its running as it should
a longer swing arm or not, a 1000 in my eye's should be able to lift the front end on throttle if so wanted to, at least in first gear coming out of a hole shot or rolling a few mph's, or its my logic any how
all my dirt bikes will lift the front end up to 4 and some bikes even 5 th gear,
and yes i know there a different deal on many levels, so, no need to tell me about apples to oranges deal!

but even my old Katana 750 would lift the front with ease on throttle alone, first and second gear, and if you worked the clutch a little in third as well

its like i said
I bought this bike on short notice based solely on yr , milage and well condition to the naked eye. no time to do any real looking at it , didn't even ride it to be 100% honest.
I knew the guy, an honest person, and rolled the dice on the deal, for the price, I felt and still feel I got a great deal!
I some what knew the guy that had it didn't know much about bikes, so I knew he didn't do much if anything to it, but ride it a couple times a yr and then park it,
only oil change done was a free one from the dealer at about a 1,000 miles he told me, , and he bought it new in 2003,
it had 3100 miles on it when I got it and it was almost 10 yrs old
fuel sat I am sure from yr to yr with just new fuel added when needed, but the bike just sat a LOT!
so this I think ,I gather
I could have a fuel problem now , low on fuel pressure, or the system just could use a real good cleaning up, new plugs and a new air filter, and maybe some other things to bring it back to what it Should be running like

winter is here more or less now, so its getting parked and will be playing with it as I can to see what I find, and when weather allows, will try to take it out to see if it runs any better
from my experience with bikes here , almost all run stronger when its cold out, so, in all honesty will be till warm weather/maybe spring time before I am sure what all good I do
no local dyno shops, or would do one now and then come spring time to see if I made any real difference, so for not it will all have to be seat of pants dyno

Please feel free to add any suggestions on things I can do, SHOULD do, to try to bring it back to what it should be, or even maybe some simple things to perk it up along the way
 

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Try running some seafoam thru it. Like I said desnorkeling an new filter should make a big difference. If that bike that old and only one oil change. Change oil ride it get it good and hot. Change oil again.
 

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Just found your thread. I recently purchased an SV1000 also, a 2006 with about 12,000 miles on and poorly maintained. It replaced a used up Honda VTR1000 (great bike) and also seems comparatively lacking in low end throttle response although it will lift up in 1st (only) with a good twist. I have done the "Seafoam/Techtron" thing, balanced the throttle bodies, adjusted the throttle position sensor, installed a TRE (timing retard eliminator), new plugs, K&N air filter, pre-programed Power Commander III USB and while I highly recommend all these mods which have improved rideability substantially, my SV's bottom end response slightly improved but still seems a bit soft. For whatever reason, I think Suzuki dumbed down the SV1000 performance by retarding the timing in the 1st three gears and opening the secondary throttle too slow. Also, the SV seems tuned for max power at higher RPM (around 6,000+ for mine) which usually sacrifices some bottom end grunt. Thanks to all for the good advice on this thread & my next move will be to try removing the secondary butterflies. My guess is that with carefull rider modulation of the throttle, stalling and spitting back can be avoided.
For what it is worth, I first installed new iridium plugs and experienced a loss of throttle response from idle ("blipping"). After replacing them with stock twin electrode plugs, better response was restored, so don't waste your $ on iridium like I did......Good to All
 

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Good to hear from you Easygo.:) Don't forget the valve adjustments as tight valves on this engine really hurt the bottom end. At 1400 miles, mine had three tight ones with the rest in the middle of spec....all were adjusted to the maximum recommended and the idle speed increased over 300 rpms! Response and bottom end torque felt noticeably better. Bumping the timing 4 degrees was VERY worthwhile at low and midrange. If that is where you do most of your running, you'd like it for sure.

Taking the STV's out doesn't cause any untoward running glitches so long as you can modify the fueling. Haven't had a single spit/stall/or pop since doing it and really like the way the engine responds without the 'nannies' trying to spoil things all the time. Mine were very slow to open on a gearchange and is where they showed themselves the most. Agree with you on the plugs...more ground electrodes the better I say.
 

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Adding fuel is necessary when removing STVs? Lean spots if you don't?
Yes. I was surprised at how well it accommodated such a radical modification, but mine did show the need for additional fuel in the midrange where it was getting a LOT more air than it was with the STV's.
 

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Thanks, RecoilRob. With your suggestions, I have new hope and more work to do. The fuel pressure check had not occured to me (1st FI bike) and without the benefit of your experience I would have only wondered and not moved ahead with the STVectomy as I now plan to do. The spit/stall was my "carb headed" thinking that the STV served a similar function as a CV slide, not realizing that fuel is all about zero's & one's with FI, as someone (you?) mentioned on another thread I ran across. Fiddling with the mixture is new tech for me (old techer), but the Power Commander instructions seem clear and there is a Dynojet tuning center nearby if I screw it up. I will probably put off checking the valves until the recommended 14,500 miles since a compression check was spot-on when the plugs were changed. My practical side tells me to leave well enough alone because this bike is running really sweet as is, but the other side wants it to be all it can be. I'm living in the past, I know, but I have been spoiled by the immediate stronger throttle response of the old Superhawk. On the other hand, I find the SV to be superior in every other way!

Also, I am lusting for a 2 into 1 M4 exhaust system to drop some weight and let out more of that sweet twin sound. Someone please save me a lot of bucks and talk me out of it.....
 
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