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Well, here's the review:

First, the time it took to arrive: Ordered on a Saturday afternoon, parts arrived Thursday via USPS. I had time to figure out how to lift the bike, and get all the necessary tools and the fork oil. I lifted the bike by looping ratchet straps through wiring/cable holes in the front of the frame, and lifting with an engine hoist. It worked very well. As for finding tools, the only thing I didn't have was the 12mm Allen socket to remove the front wheel axle, and that was tough to find. I ended up Cutting off a bit of a 12mm wrench and putting it in a standard 12mm hex socket - made my own tool.

As for oil, the Amsoil was sold by the quart, and you need just over a quart (but less than a liter) for 2nd gen forks, so I wasn't going to buy 2 liters of that and have a bunch of waste. So began my quest to find a liter of full synthetic 5w fork oil. Nothing seemed to advertise full synthetic on the bottle, but I found out that Motorex "Racing Fork Oil" was for sure (plus it has a nice little bendy pour spout). It came by the liter, and it was only a couple bucks more than Bel-Ray (which I wasn't sure if it was synthetic), but I figured it was about as high quality fork oil as you can get, so why not use that, right?

Anyway, installation was very easy on the know-how scale, intermediate on the effort/physical difficulty scale... took me about 3 hours, having never done this before (this was the most in depth wrenching I've done). It was a very straightforward process though, and you can find a more in depth procedure elsewhere. Basically, remove forks, drain oil, put in new oil, put in INTIMINATOR, set oil level, replace forks. The hardest part by far was replacing the fork caps... those little buggers. Not cutting the spacers didn't make it any easier.

So now, since I didn't cut my spacers, my preload is at set at the minimum, and it's just about right. I did have to crank up the rear shock to match (I think I had too much sag both front and rear before - never bothered to really set it up). I weigh about 185 with gear, have the stock springs in the front forks, the stock shock in the rear (preload maxed out now), and it feels pretty good now.

On to the actual review: I noticed a definite difference the moment I pulled out the driveway - literally. The bump at the end of it didn't feel so harsh. I found myself trying to drive over bumps and sewers because it amazed me how they seemed to disappear. What I've found is that harsh bumps are almost completely gone, but they don't seem to do much for rolling bumps (like a ramp-style road imperfection - gradual stuff) which is fine by me. Brake dive is almost totally gone. I notice almost no brake dive until I'm going about 5mph, then it starts to dive, but still less so than stock.

All but one motorcycle I've ever ridden had equal or worse suspension than the SV (incredible, right? We all thought the stock SV was bottom of the barrel... and it is, but other bikes have crap suspension, too, eh?). INTIMINATORS definitely are a huge improvement over stock.

The one motorcycle with good suspension I have to compare it to is a KTM 625 SMC. This comparison isn't even fair. I'm not a suspension guru, but I'm under the impression that the suspension that came stock on the KTM is pretty much as good as it gets... not even in the same league. I have to say though, that while the KTM does feel overall much more "solid" up front, and I'd pick it over pretty much any suspension any day, I'm not sure that it's any better at dealing with harsh road imperfections any better than the INTIMINATORS. Also, the KTM has a top notch rear shock too, while my SV is still stock. The stock SV shock takes away from the overall ride a bit, so therefore I might be overall less impressed than I should be. I mean, I feel no harshness from the font end, but still get it from the back, so I still feel harshness over bumps overall.

I'm not the guy to ask how these do with hard riding (track, canyons, etc). If you hit a bump mid corner, and these suck it right up like they do in the straights, well that's a lot better than hydraulic lock you get from the stock fork.

Conclusion: Install is as easy as a front end upgrade gets. For dealing with imprefect real world roads, these are great... they suck up bumps like you wouldn't belive, and all but completely eliminate brake dive. It does all the things you'd want to make for an even better city bike. I can't comment or compare to emulators, as I've never used them. I can't say much about canyon carving or track days, but If the world was perfect, and bumps and cracks didn't exist, I don't know if these would serve a purpose over stock other than eliminating brake dive. In that perfect world, I imagine I'd rather go with a cartridge style fork.

But this is the real world, and we have a limited supply of real money, and in "bang for buck" terms, I don't know if it gets much better than this. Emulators are more expensive, and a GSX-R swap is more yet. At the $150 introductory price, go for it definitely. At $300, well, that's starting to get a little steep. If you're on a budget, I don't know if $300 would be worth it, but if you have a bit of money to blow, $300 might not seem that bad. There are worse things to spend money on, and after all, using money to upgrade the SV's weak points instead of blinging it out is always a good idea.
 

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Good review, thanks!
Ordered mine the other day. Gonna finally install my Sonic springs at the same time.
 
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