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Discussion Starter #1
I seek advice on how to ride a motorcycle when dropping off a resume or giving a job interview.

Before I bought a motorcycle I had a car a nice little 04 grand am, whenever I had to drop off my resume or give a job interview I would dress up all prim and proper, dress shirt/pants/tie/shoes depending on the job, you all know the rule dress for one position higher. Now though I ride a motorcycle and wearing a suit is well not possible when I have to drop off 4 or 5 resumes, or have 4 or 5 interviews, sometimes not always I can borrow a car and that works out great, but usually it's just my bike, i was thinking maybe a polo shirt and black riding pants textile type, and black boots not obvious riding boots but something like if you see only the front end you'll think they're just regular dress shoes, what do you guys think, are any of you guys employers that would tell me whats up, or do any of you guys have some experience with a similar situation?

Thanks for the help, assuming anyone responds.
 

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Employers base their decision on many things, including qualifications you posess.

However, most people base some of their opinions on first impressions. Be sure to offer the best/most appropriate impression for the job. We all know that motorcyclists get a bum rap, as most people view the sport with misunderstanding or may even view it negatively.

I would borrow a car, get someone to drive me, or find a way to don the appropriate apparrel if I had to ride the bike to get to the destination. In this economy, the employer has the upper hand because they can choose from a glut of applicants to fill a minimal number of positions.
 

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You should definitely NOT ride the bike. Borrow a car. Or possibly, rent one for a day to go around dropping off resumes. I've got a HR degree among other things and I can tell you that most of the people who are making hiring/firing decisions know little to nothing about the important criteria for employee selection. Most people think that they are smart enough to figure somebody out by their first impression. We've all heard someone say something like "I can tell in the first 5 minutes of meeting a person if they're _____".<--- (insert adjective). Sadly, it's a game, whether people want to admit it or not.

That being said...play the game! Dress professionally, because some people would rather hire a well-dress slacker than an average-dressed worker. Because we all know that anyone who can manage to squeeze their fat rump into a nice suit is the smartest, hardest-working, most punctual, most dependable, honest, and most professional employee. For example, look at all those well-dressed jamooks on Wall Street. Those are some of the most honest people we know right?! Those same people deciding whom to hire will assume that you are some kind of hooligan if you show up on a motorcycle. I don't know about you, but I get bad helmet hair when I ride.

However, it pays to know who you're dealing with. The person taking your application/resume may be a fellow rider. Or, the interviewer may be a fellow rider. That would be a way to score some quick brownie points. But odds are that they don't ride.

One other option....just ride in only your interview clothes and park a good way off from where you are submitting resumes so you can just walk in from the street. That way, they don't see you riding a motorcycle. You just aren't going to have any protective gear on and I don't know what you'll do about the bugs splattering across your chest, arms, and knees!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I see, this is all good advice thanks for your help, I don't think I'll be the only one to learn from your posts. Thanks a lot!
 

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how about showing up in full gear and telling the interviewer that you are serious about every thing you do, including safety when riding. shows you are a responsible adult. (ok, i know there are douche bag bosses who will freak out at the mention of motorcycles. so kiss up to them and maybe after a few weeks you'll be sorry you work for such an a$$hat.)
 

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how about showing up in full gear and telling the interviewer that you are serious about every thing you do, including safety when riding. shows you are a responsible adult. (ok, i know there are douche bag bosses who will freak out at the mention of motorcycles. so kiss up to them and maybe after a few weeks you'll be sorry you work for such an a$$hat.)
+1, Money is tight not everyone has a car, I would say just make the gear that are wearing look spotless and if he asks about the gear just say its my only mode of transportation currently, no one should criticize you over what you wear, its about if you can do the job or not and if the interviewer cant accept that maybe its not the job for you.

I know my dad went to plenty of job interviews or the years on his Busa and walked out with a job.
 

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I went on several interviews on my bike wearing my suit. Did I have gear on? Only my jacket over. Regular shoes which wasn't smart but it went well. I brought my saddle bags and I would throw all my stuff in there, I also brought a comb and hair stuff to clean it all up before walking in. They had NO idea I came on a motorcycle and with the negative views on motorcycles I didn't mention a peep about it until after I got the job.
 

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I ride in my suit all the time. I wear some black boots that look decent and either a jacket over my shirt or a icon vest under my suit jacket. When I dropped off resumes I would use a backpack so I wouldn't have to fold it and just explained that all I had was a bike, cars are too expensive. I'd pack my gloves in my helmet and then just set the helmet in a corner some where or if I was in and out I'd just hang on to it for a second. I don't think people are as judgmental as some believe and I wouldn't want to work for someone who was anyways.
 

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I've never had a problem getting a job on the bike, but then again I work in the industry and get job offers from dealerships all the time.

I have used it to apply for various other jobs which I always just wore some nice boots, and all of my gear over my nice clothes. I actually wore my winter/water 3/4 cut jacket with the liner out so I'd look more like a touring guy lol. And when I got there I put all my gear into my tailbag.

I've had callbacks on pretty much all of my interviews and I ride to all of them, usually the callbacks come too late and I've already jumped on one job or another.

Which is another good thing, keep in touch with them even after you find a job, let them know your still interested in their job but you've commited to something else, tells them your the loyal type.
 

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I went to my previous job's interview with the bike. I rode up from San Diego to Los Angeles--no way I was doing that run in a car during rush hour with the immigration checkpoint being active.

I packed my good clothes and shoes in a big bag, strapped it on the back of the bike and off I went. When I arrived, I found a restroom and brought the bag in and changed clothes/freshened up in there. I stuffed my gear in the big bag and stuck it in the corner of the interview room, out of the way.

No problem.
 

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ive seen people in full suits with ties on there streetbike you can always try that but probley not the safest way to get there
 

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Get a train, plane or automobile but try to refrain from taking your motorbike for some of the aforementioned reasons above. If you have to take your bike try to do the rounds within on vicinity. For example, if there are several employers in one area, drive your bike to the area then get changed into smarter clothes (ideally non creasable) and then walk aorund handing your resume out. By the way, have you included a hobbies section? These are usually not needed and mentioning biking could go against you with some stricter employees. I've found this guide: 50+ Skills to Put on a Resume [Key to Get a Job] to be a lot of help on what to actually write on the resume:
 
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