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Just curious what are the RRHP people are getting out of their Gen 1 Sv 650's either stock, Supersport or Superbike builds -
My Supersport build - with 1 mm oversize, stock carbs (jetted), stock cams, thin gaskets blah blah blah, I'm getting 83 rrhp. Is that good?
 

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Have you lightened your flywheel? I would highly recommend doing so, the crank on SVs can be a little fragile on that end.

My impression is that it's not too hard to build a high power SV engine, it's just hard to get the crank to stay together.
 

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Just curious what are the RRHP people are getting out of their Gen 1 Sv 650's either stock, Supersport or Superbike builds -
My Supersport build - with 1 mm oversize, stock carbs (jetted), stock cams, thin gaskets blah blah blah, I'm getting 83 rrhp. Is that good?
That's eyebrow raisingly good. I've done the same on my 2nd gen and I'd be flabbergasted if I were putting more than 75hp to the ground.
 

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Also suspect a high dyno reading. 80's I would imagine is decently into the superbike territory.

My stock everything rebuild just netted me 65 ponies which is dead center for stock I would imagine.
 

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im looking to switch the exhaust air filter and re jet my carbs on my 01 sv 650s? how much of a hp gain can i get from that?
 

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I'm gonna say that's real good for a Gen 1 650. I've only had mine for a couple of months. With 677cc 2mm over big bore kit, DynoJet jet kit, full Yoshimura RS-3 exhaust, and 2nd gen cams. Even with proper tuning, I'm only seeing 79hp.
 

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Dyno numbers are only good for tuning a particular bike. They are irrelevant when comparing different bikes dynoed on different machines, different parameters, etc.
 

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Dyno numbers are only good for tuning a particular bike. They are irrelevant when comparing different bikes dynoed on different machines, different parameters, etc.
So are you saying that dynos aren't accurate? And should only be used if you are tuning and testing on the same machine to obtain better numbers on my bike? I'm not saying you are wrong, I'm only asking as I assumed all dynos were set to the same standards, providing accurate numbers. At least I would hope they would be accurate at $35 a pop.
 

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So are you saying that dynos aren't accurate? And should only be used if you are tuning and testing on the same machine to obtain better numbers on my bike? I'm not saying you are wrong, I'm only asking as I assumed all dynos were set to the same standards, providing accurate numbers. At least I would hope they would be accurate at $35 a pop.
They definitely aren't equal, and really are only useful when tuning a bike on the same dyno. Getting a baseline on 1 dyno and then tuning it and moving to a different dyno will not tell you anything. Even tuning across different days or seasons on the same dyno will lead you different results based on weather conditions.
 

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They're similar, but not the same. Your bike might pull 75 on one, and +/- 5 on the next.

Most people look at the curves more than numbers when tuning, i.e. A/F, torque
 

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So are you saying that dynos aren't accurate? And should only be used if you are tuning and testing on the same machine to obtain better numbers on my bike? I'm not saying you are wrong, I'm only asking as I assumed all dynos were set to the same standards, providing accurate numbers. At least I would hope they would be accurate at $35 a pop.
I'm no expert on the subject, but even the same dyno won't give perfectly consistent results which is on reason why they do multiple runs at a time.

There are also different types of dynos which can yield fairly different numbers.
 

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And getting a real Dyno test should cost around $200 right?
 

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Operator inexperience can also contribute to varying results. As stated, the curves and comparing results for different setups on the same bike are more important, imo, then actual raw numbers. Of course, the most accurate dyno is the butt dyno.
 

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For a TUNE, sure. But not to just stick it on & get a baseline reading.
Yep - I would expect to pay $50-$75 to get 1 pull with A/F or CO2 readings. $35 maybe for no A/F.

$350+ for a tune with many pulls, especially if it's carb'd. Pain in the ass that is to swap jets all the time.
 

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Agreed, I ran a dyno for years when i turned a wrench, a "dyno jet" dyno is basically an accelerometer.....and used for mostly tuning purposes... same machine , same bike, visual results. An eddy current type dyno.... one that applies load is better for an accurate standard number. But again we always seem to forget a very important thing....HORSEPOWER ISN'T REAL!!!! its a formula and can be manipulated many ways..... what any racer knows and wants is .....torque..... that is what you feel,that is what pulls you out of a corner, spins your rear wheel and gets you to your top rmp AKA horsepower!!! We had guys come in, spend tons of cash, and get upset cause they only picked up 5 hp..... but mean time i grabbed 10 torque through out the entire range!!! Only focusing on horsepower numbers is a bit squidish! Its a tough thing to get your head around because the industry focuses so heavily on hp. But this is because of the ease of manipulation in the formula to achieve the result wanted.
Have a read if you really want to understand things:
http://www.epi-eng.com/piston_engine_technology/power_and_torque.htm
Long live 5252..dam things get complicated..lol... don't even get me started on turbos!
p.s. Hi...i'm new to the forum.
 

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Agreed, I ran a dyno for years when i turned a wrench, a "dyno jet" dyno is basically an accelerometer.....and used for mostly tuning purposes... same machine , same bike, visual results. An eddy current type dyno.... one that applies load is better for an accurate standard number. But again we always seem to forget a very important thing....HORSEPOWER ISN'T REAL!!!! its a formula and can be manipulated many ways..... what any racer knows and wants is .....torque..... that is what you feel,that is what pulls you out of a corner, spins your rear wheel and gets you to your top rmp AKA horsepower!!! We had guys come in, spend tons of cash, and get upset cause they only picked up 5 hp..... but mean time i grabbed 10 torque through out the entire range!!! Only focusing on horsepower numbers is a bit squidish! Its a tough thing to get your head around because the industry focuses so heavily on hp. But this is because of the ease of manipulation in the formula to achieve the result wanted.
Have a read if you really want to understand things:
http://www.epi-eng.com/piston_engine_technology/power_and_torque.htm
Long live 5252..dam things get complicated..lol... don't even get me started on turbos!
p.s. Hi...i'm new to the forum.
That link that you posted is probably the best explanation that I've ever seen on the differences between horsepower and torque for a reader with no physics background. I took 8 credits of physics in college and managed to retain some understanding of the two, but I still found that article very informative. Thanks for the link. I've bookmarked it on my browser and will likely post that link in other forums when a horsepower/torque discussion comes up.
 
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