Suzuki SV650 Riders Forum banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Couple of questions.

should you replace a rear tire when it has a significant amount of being squared off?

How does have a squared of tire affect handling adversely?

Today going on the freeway for the first time it felt like the rear end was almost sliding / shaking from time to time. Very unnerving.

I have read that riding on a squared off tire isint to terrible but have i read wrong?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
A squared off tire starts to imitate a flat car tire and will affect turn in. You will feel a resistance to turn in as quickly. It depends upon how large the flat section is. If your rear end instability is due to the tire with proper air pressure, then it's time for a new tire. This is assuming that your suspension is working properly as well. Once you start to feel a difference in handling either from your front or rear tire, in the dry or wet that saps your confidence, better to replace with fresh rubber. All tires will square off to some extent due to straight line cruising without causing handling issues. Just make sure it's the tire and not something else. Your description almost seems like something may be loose in the rear. How old or how many miles on the tire?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
tire is not down the the wear bars.

I just bought the bike and it had 5800 miles on it and has dunlop sportmax's on it (those are the stock ones right?)

tire pressure is at 40psi

not sure about suspension but i'm 175lbs, how should i adjust the suspension?
I think i've read that there isint much adjusting that can be done to the stock setup so i didn't really even think about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
If the 40psi is your rear pressure, you're running too high a pressure for your riding wgt and solo riding. The pressure should be closer to 36. Too high a pressure and you will wear out the center faster. You should add in your profile what year SV you have. You can at least adjust the preload of the shock and forks to set rider sag for your full wgt while riding the bike. There are Youtube vids showing how to set suspension sag and you can go to this link as well for an overview: http://www.gostar-racing.com/club/motorcycle_suspension_set-up.htm.

Tires can need replacing before you get to the wear bars for various reasons including age and wear patterns due to improper pressure and extensive straight line hwy riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
bike is 2005 and the guy i bought it from was a dealer that took it on a trade and let it sit for 3+ months.
He said it had only had one owner before him.

I would hate to think the tires are the ones that came on the bike new but you never know. surely tires would warped after 5+ years.

bike had 5800 miles when i bought it so now im thinking tires.

looks like everyone is saying 2ct's for non track spirited road riding?

also thank you for the link
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,845 Posts
RMAN mentioned that rear tire pressure should be 36 in the rear; Suzuki says 36 rear/33 front. Didn't know if you were aware that there's a difference between front and rear pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
You can find the date of manufacture for the tires on the sidewalls. Look for the letters DOT and then an elongated oval with numbers within. There should be four numbers. For let's say oem '05 tires you might see 3005. The first two numbers show the weeks of the year and the last two the year. So, 30= 30th week of the year or 2nd week of August and the 05 is 2005.

There are many good tires for spirited street riding. Besides the 2CT there are Qualifier II, BT-016, as well as the sport touring tires that last longer and still provide excellent traction in both wet and dry. Many reviews of tires on this forum.

Scroll down this page to see the date code on an actual tire. http://www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Riding/Street/Resources/TireDesignations.aspx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
RMAN mentioned that rear tire pressure should be 36 in the rear; Suzuki says 36 rear/33 front. Didn't know if you were aware that there's a difference between front and rear pressure.
yeah i was mistaken i did put 33 in the front and 36 in the rear. it still has the tire sticker on the chain guard with pressures. but it say 33 f and 36 r with single rider or dual. should it be less with a single?

tires say 42 06. tires should be replaced before 6 years even if they havent been ridden that much correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,123 Posts
Some do ride the SV with less pressure, but I always went with the 33/36. Too low and the tire can overheat and deteriorate faster than normal. Some ride lower for better traction, but for street riding with far from smooth pavement, I would use the recommended pressures. Tires are a component of the suspension system besides their other duties. If I was riding dual on the SV, I would probably add some pounds.

In terms of tire age, since you are experiencing problems, I would replace the tires. Even if the older tire doesn't show dry rot or cracking, tires harden with age and become stiff. Fine for dirt bike tires, but not street tires. A new set of tires always brings a smile to your ride.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,041 Posts
+1
Except a small portion of the pressure, and the reason being that tire manufacturers may state the pressure independently from the bike maker. The manual may state 33 but the mfr may state 36, and may go as far as to state different pressures for different rider/bike weights, this is due to their independent wear testing for optimal wear. Too much or too little can cause a tire to wear extremely faster than their and your expected mileage output from them.

Sent from my right shoe phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
425 Posts
RMAN said that running higher pressure wears the center tread down faster. How come other people put higher pressure for touring to reduce wear? Sorry I am a little confused cause I run 2+ psi (35 f 38r) which I probably shouldn't given my weight. I used to own a ninja250 so my information came primarily from ninja250.org

http://faq.ninja250.org/wiki/What_tire_pressures_should_I_use?

So far I go by feel of temperature on the tread with my hand and how it feels for me. I have a set of Pirelli Angel ST's which are suppose to last for awhile. I get scared whenever the tread gets super hot so in my mind from the stuff i hear about greasy I am thinking the tire will warp or flatten out faster. I don't think I should be picky about tread life, but a part of me wants the most out of my money/mileage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
RMAN said that running higher pressure wears the center tread down faster. How come other people put higher pressure for touring to reduce wear? .
cause Rman was talking out of his butt on that one, sorry Rman, thats my opinion

in a car tire on a car, exccessive pressure means more wear in center, cars don't lean and the tire is supose to lay a flat even contact patch

bikes wear faster in center as a matter of normal course unless yer on the track or live in fantastic twisties that keep you leaned over 90% ot the time

on a bike tire, pressure is how you regulate the tire temperature, less pressure,more flex & squirm, more heat, more wear, higher pressure, stiffer carcass, cooler temps, less wear

some tire mfg use different carcass design (Avon in particular with VBD) and recommend higher pressures than what the bike mfg recommends

less pressure does not always meen more traction, maybe a bigger contact patch, but if rubber gets hotter than design it may get greasy

shoot for 10% increase in pressure from cold inflation to warmed up, if your not getting 10% increase, drop your pressure, if your getting more than 10% increase, the raise your cold inflation pressure
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
I agree with Randy, though I'm not sold on the 10% "rule". Just set it n forget it. Don't over think it by throwing the whole 10% increase thing into the mix.

Besides, if we were looking for a 10% rise then I'd be looking for only a ~2.5psi increase at the track where I'm running 28psi hot, but I'd be looking for a ~3.5-4psi increase when I'm riding on the street where I'm putting much less heat into the tire. That doesn't make much sense.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
I agree with Randy, though I'm not sold on the 10% "rule". Just set it n forget it. Don't over think it by throwing the whole 10% increase thing into the mix.

Besides, if we were looking for a 10% rise then I'd be looking for only a ~2.5psi increase at the track where I'm running 28psi hot, but I'd be looking for a ~3.5-4psi increase when I'm riding on the street where I'm putting much less heat into the tire. That doesn't make much sense.
I was refering to street pressures Pete. several years ago now, I used to run suzuki 33f/36r specs, when I checked the pressures hot, they would be up to about 45-46 both front and rear, I raised the cold pressure to 39f/41r and warm pressures dropped to 44-45 and tire life almost doubled
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
with an older slightly worn tire is would be advantageous to drop the pressure a couple psi for better traction?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
I used to run suzuki 33f/36r specs, when I checked the pressures hot, they would be up to about 45-46 both front and rear
You expect us to believe that your tires picked up 12psi purely due to the heat assiciated with riding?

Randy, put down the funny stuff.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,333 Posts
You expect us to believe that your tires picked up 12psi purely due to the heat assiciated with riding?

Randy, put down the funny stuff.

I might not be the fastest guy around, but I'm always moving and I do weigh 300 geared up, add that to a day in southern Appalachian twisities

I don't ride a 20 minute track session then let the tires cool down, I stop 10 minutes for gas every 2½-3 hours and that's about it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,135 Posts
Randy, this has nothing to do with how fast you, I or anyone else is... but on modern tires, under normal circumstances, there's not a snowball's chance in hell that ANYONE is going to build up 12psi.


As for the 20 minute track session comment, how long or short your riding session is has VERY LITTLE to do with a rise in pressure. It's much more a function of heat generated which is far more closely related to how hard you're accelerating and braking. Put me on the track for 3 hours straight and I garantee you I won't generate any more heat than I would in a 12 minute long 8 lap sprint.


Now I'm not callin you a liar... but if you saw a 12psi rise then there were some VERY extenuating circumstances.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top