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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, not sure if this is the best sub for this topic.

My rear tire is quite worn and before any one starts, I've got a new tire in the garage and it'll be going on immediately. However, I wanted to share something and ask if it was just 'due to the tire'.

The tire:


I know, not great. I was pushing my luck under the guise that I 'don't ride super aggressive in the turns'.

Anyhow, I was out riding yesterday afternoon and after my tires were nice and warm, I decided to start working on turning harder and leaning more and then it happened: my rear tire broke loose, only slightly. While I didn't fall, that momentary feeling put the fear of God into me. Shortly, after I regained my composure and sure enough, it happens again- this time I almost go down.

Can a tire, in this shape be as hazardous as I describe? The roads I ride are riddled with patch strips where the town has repair cracks in the pavement- is that the real causation?

I ride a few times a week, and I have never felt this level of loss in control. It was very scary.

Anyhow, just looking to open the discussion to see if there's anything else I should be looking at here. It was not a fun experience, but hopefully serves as a reminder to myself to keep on top of my ****.
 

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It has little to do with how the tire looks, but if the rubber that's left is supple or died out and hard. Hard tires don't grip well and are dangerous on a bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It has little to do with how the tire looks, but if the rubber that's left is supple or died out and hard. Hard tires don't grip well and are dangerous on a bike.
I see.

So, other than being a seasoned rider, is there a way to gauge the stickiness?

Obviously, an 'older/worn' tire is what it is, but this tire, while older, has no rot or dried appearance.

Thanks for the reply.
 

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You have a flat band down the middle. When you lean in, you are riding on the edge of that band.
Also any tire more than five years old should be replaced, due to the hardening snailman mentioned.
Hazardous? No tread means little or no puncture resistance.

tire age code.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You have a flat band down the middle. When you lean in, you are riding on the edge of that band.
Also any tire more than five years old should be replaced, due to the hardening snailman mentioned.
Hazardous? No tread means little or no puncture resistance.

View attachment 41977
I'll check the date later today - thank you.

Other than bad rubber and technique, is there anything mechanical that could cause a slip as I described?

I've got about 500mi on the bike (purchased wirh 19k) and is my first ride. I have however taken it apart and replaced all wear items etc.
 

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So, tire was made in the summer of 2015, not too bad on that front.

However:
https://ibb.co/iXmtQT

Yikes.
Mine was more squared than that when I replaced it, and I didn't have slippage issues. It will make it tougher to lean in, but that's about it.

Another possibility is you over-lubed the chain, or have a small oil leak. These will contaminate you rear tire with grease/oil, which then soaks into the rubber.
 

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When you have the tire replaced, check the swing arm for side play. I find no spec on this, other than "no play" in the periodic maintenance section.
 

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Could be an old tire but you mentioned the road being riddled with patch strips. If you are riding the stock rear shock, that can definitely cause the rear tire to step out, the reason being very poor rebound control in the stock shock. If you happen to hit a bump in mid-turn, the tire can literally remain in the air too long and cause a side slip; I had this happen several times. Preload has nothing to do with this. The stock shock is just a POS.

Even if replacing the rear tire helps, I suggest getting a rear shock with adjustable rebound and compression. It makes a world of difference in how the bike rides.
 

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Was the slip on deceleration or acceleration? What was your tire pressure? Old tires can look good but have lost a lot of their suppleness. And that tire doesn't have the greatest traction when new. Tar snakes can definitely cause slips, especially when hot.

Mad
 

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Even if replacing the rear tire helps, I suggest getting a rear shock with adjustable rebound and compression. It makes a world of difference in how the bike rides.
How do I know if my shock is stock? I bought an 03 used in 2013. Any markings I should look for?
 

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We need more info. Like has been asked, where you accelerating, decelerating or holding a constant speed when it slipped? Was it early in the turn? Late in the turn? How fast(ish)? How sharp was the turn? When you say patches, do you mean squares of fresh pavement over old pavement? Coldpack asphalt? Tar snakes? Concrete patches? Gravel patches? How fresh are the patches? Had it rained recently? Was it humid? What was the temperature (roughly)? All these things come into play when thinking about traction. Also, a squared off tire can make leaning into a corner feel scary because it fights, fights, fights, and then all at once drops into a lean. Are you sure that your back tire stepped out, and that what you felt wasn't the bike feeling like it was falling over for a flash? Is there a chance there was light sand or some rocks/pebbles/gravel on the road?
 

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Heletface mentioned asphalt patches. If it gets warm enough, that tar can melt and get slippery. If asphalt gets hot enough, it can liquify and get very slippery
 

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It has little to do with how the tire looks, but if the rubber that's left is supple or died out and hard. Hard tires don't grip well and are dangerous on a bike.
This +1. "Rubber" is a lot of stuff, some of it remains volatile and degrades from degassing. Some of the chemicals are susceptible to degradation through repeated heat cycles.
How old are your tires, BTW?
 

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This +1. "Rubber" is a lot of stuff, some of it remains volatile and degrades from degassing. Some of the chemicals are susceptible to degradation through repeated heat cycles.
How old are your tires, BTW?
In all seriousness, tires should most likely be replaced about the 5 year mark even if they have not been used much or at all. Check the sidewall for a rectangular box for a 4 digit manufacture date. Last 2 digits are the year.

Rubber side down and keep safe
 
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