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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know the spring rate of the stock rear shock for the 2018? I’m throwing heavier 1kg/mm springs in the front and want to figure out how far off the rear shock will be.
Eventually I’ll replace it but I’m curious about the stock hardware and can’t seem to find it anywhere. Thanks
 

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Here's a spreadsheet with a number of rear shock choices made for the previous gens:
 

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Ok next question which gsxr750 rear shocks are the right length for the sv?
Just incase you dont already know... Gen 3 shock is considerably shorter than the Gen 1 and 2.
315mm vs 330 - 340. I nearly went down a rabbit hole when I was setting my gen 3 up for racing and a guy was selling a quality K tech rear shock 2nd hand out of a Gen 2 bike. Someone in the know saved me at the 11th hour.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Just incase you dont already know... Gen 3 shock is considerably shorter than the Gen 1 and 2.
315mm vs 330 - 340. I nearly went down a rabbit hole when I was setting my gen 3 up for racing and a guy was selling a quality K tech rear shock 2nd hand out of a Gen 2 bike. Someone in the know saved me at the 11th hour.
Thanks I was aware the the Gen 3 is 315 vs the 330 of the Gen 1/2.

Based on the chart it looks like an 07-08 gsxr1000 shock will be perfect. 315 length with 10.1kg/mm spring and 63mm stroke. Has any one tried to fit one to a Gen 3?

Found one for 125 here:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well bad news it does not fit. I was feeling pretty good about it until I went to put in the top mounting hole. The reservoir hits the tank pivot. It clears the battery box and everything else. I would have happily cut plastic but I’m not feeling good about cutting metal brackets plus if I do “make it fit” I would have to removing the shock any time I need under the tank. So not a good plan. A gsxr750 from 2008 might work since the reservoir sits lower and a litter further away but Now I have to sell this shock off first.
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Any one know where this little guy goes? Found it on the floor after pulling the shock out and putting it back in. Not 100% sure it came off the bike but I figured I may have popped it off while knocking things about trying to fit the other shock.

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hmmmmmm… Now I really want to try the 2006-2009 gsxr750 rear shock. The 1000 was so close I could taste it. Does any one have a gsxr750 shock from 2006-09 that could measure the reservoir relative to the top mounting hole. If the 1000 reservoir was 1/2” lower or 1/2” further from the mounting hole it would have fit no problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Awesome, I debated between a 750 and 1000 shock but went with the 1000 for the heavier spring rate. Man I which I had seen this sooner I would have just went with the 750 shock. Oh well I’ll hunt down a low milage 09 750 shock now. Maybe I’ll be able to swap the 1000 spring on it and get the best of both worlds.
Could I get away with the standard valving with the heavier 10.5kg spring vs the 9.5kg of the 750 spring? Just crack the rebound and compression a little higher to compensate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Here are some comparison pics to the stock and 1000 shock. You can see the res is lower and further away on the 750. The spring on the 1000 is too short so it won’t fit. The stock 9.5kg/mm spring of the 750 should be a good match to my weight anyway. They are all nearly the same length eye to eye 1000 and stock are pretty much identical. The 750 might be 2mm longer if that.
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It’s just been installed took about 1.5 hours total. The shock pretty much fits right in without rubbing on anything. I can already tell that the rear is taller with me sitting on it sag was about 30mm with standard 750 preload settings. The stock shock was sagging 35mm with max preload. I didn’t do total sag so I’ll probably need to crank the preload up a bit when I finally get around to measuring it but it’s good for now. I’ve only taken it for a short ride so far but I can tell the rear is more firm and isn’t sagging on throttle as weight transfers to the rear tire under acceleration. I’ll give a full review after a few days riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Now for the fun part here are some pics I took during the install.

I propped up the bike with straps from my ceiling then took off the seat and side trim. In this pic you can see the top shock bolt.
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Take out the screws holding in the battery box and pop it up in the cavity to make it easy to remove and insert the shock.
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You need to remove the 17mm link bolt and the 14mm lower shock bolt.
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to get at the 14mm shock bolt you need to knock out the link bolt and drop the links down
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the stock shock comes out very easy once the two mounting bolts are out. You can see here with the battery box up it’s really easy to slip in the new shock If you don’t pop it up the res and mud flap will keep you from inserting it. The shock is a little tight going into the top mount but other wise it’s easy. Torque your bolts per the manual, reinstall all the other parts removed, and job done.
One note is that the stock bottom bolt is to short so you will need to use the gsxr lower mounting bolts. Mine came with a set so I was good to go. Also make sure you put the bolt in from the muffler side and the nut on the shifter side for the bottom or it won’t clear the links. The top is the opposite to mimic stock configuration
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Looks good and just slightly rubs the rubber mat but clears the battery box by a few mm.
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As expected the tank dosnt lift all the way but still enough room to get in and swap an air filter.
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all in all an easy mod and since no modification is need I can always go back if I don’t like it. Now it’s time to ride and tune for rebound and compression. I set the shock to factory 750 settings.
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Ok I went and did the total rear sag and came up with 40mm. I read some where that total sag should be 1/3 of total travel which is 130mm so anything close to 43 is ideal. I’ll probably just leave it alone at this point. Unless someone else has seen other numbers. Let me know if I’m making sense.

I also decided to check the seat height and I gained about 3/4 of and inch. With the tuck and roll seat I was right at 31.1 inches and now it’s at 31.85in. I guess less static sag and a little longer shock, ~5mm according to specs I could find, resulted in a slightly higher seat. Good news for me since I’m a giant. When I get my seat it will be nearly 33in high.
 
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