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2020 Suzuki SV650 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone,

As I mentioned in:
I'm upgrading my front and rear suspension on my 2020 SV650 ABS.

My new custom Wilbers 640 rear shock arrived from Germany yesterday:

Bottle Drink Wood Glass bottle Bottle cap



Question about preparing the bike to install the rear shock:
I have a front and rear stand now. Do i need a "motorcycle lift" stand under the engine, after I remove the exhaust?

I was thinking about purchasing this:

I don't have "rafters" in my garage or a tall ladder, so I'm wondering if this motorcycle lift is suitable to take the weight off the shock so I can remove it?

Note:
I was relieved that Wilbers already knew about the "threaded" part of the clevis that the lower mounting bolt secures to (with no nut needed). From reading other posts on other shocks, some don't have it.

Also Note:
According to the Wilbers install manual, the way shock should be install is as pictured, with the red Wilbers sticker and "nipple" pointing to the rear of the bike.
This puts the thread on the wrong side, as the bolt inserts from the right to the left.

Question:
I'm hoping the I can just put the top part in a vise and turn the clevis 180 to put the threaded part on the left side. That's how the stock shock is, and how the service manual depicts it anyway.

Thanks for any comments or advice.

Burt
 

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I hung my bike from tiedown straps from the rafters, I first put it on it's pit stand then just lifted it a little with the tiedowns. Motorcycle lift should work or find a garage with rafters. My Nitron shock required a bolt and nut, I inserted the bolt from the shifter side and the nut on the rear brake side. Shouldn't matter which side really.
 

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I have aftermarket rearsets (turning the factory pegs upside down will work the same), lifted the bike on the rear stand, put automotive jack stands under the pegs, and let the rear stand down. Reverse the procedure when done.
 

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2020 Suzuki SV650 ABS
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I hung my bike from tiedown straps from the rafters, I first put it on it's pit stand then just lifted it a little with the tiedowns. Motorcycle lift should work or find a garage with rafters. My Nitron shock required a bolt and nut, I inserted the bolt from the shifter side and the nut on the rear brake side. Shouldn't matter which side really.
Thanks @wollerms. That's good to know that there's enough room so it doesn't matter. I suppose I could just leave the threaded side on the right side and do as you have.
If I decided to use a vise and turn it 180*, I hope it doesn't harm the shock.
 

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2006 SV650S
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I have no direct experience with Wilber shocks, but I'd be concerned about putting a lot of torque on the rebound adjuster mechanism. It would be nice to have some coil spring compressors to remove the tension on the parts. If you don't have them, it might help to back off the spring tensioning rings as far as you can and maybe use a bit of spray grease where there will be some metal-on-metal sliding. Still would be worried about the effect on the rebound adjuster since I have no idea how it's constructed. Good luck.

Auto part Electric blue Machine Tool Engineering
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Perhaps ignore all that I just wrote. I just looked at a parts diagram. As 'Woolerms' said - the bolt can be inserted from either side; you shouldn't need to turn the fitting around.
Thanks @Jeff McLellan . This will be the first time I've done this, and I want to make sure I do it correctly, hence my asking for help.
When someone suggested that I could put the top part in a vise, and turn the clevis 180, I didn't even know that was possible w/o damaging my new (expensive) shock.

I'm wondering...
I mentioned how the Wilbers manual says to mount it. (as in picture).
But as I look at the shock, I can't see any different between the "front" and "back". Can't I just turn it around if nothings in the way of that "nipple"? (nothing is).
That puts the thread on the correct side.
 

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2006 SV650S
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I'm really not the one to give advice. I'm new to all of this. My guess is that what you are calling a nipple is a set screw for compression damping? If that's what you are referring to, what does the manual say about it. It looks to have some witness marking with paint so perhaps it is set from the factory and does not need to be accessed. Hopefully some of the other people on here who know what the are talking about will wade in. Nice looking shock, BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@BurtSv650
Hey man, any news regarding the shock and forks? Did you manage to install them?
Hey @St.Dusan
Thanks for the ping! Yup, much to share.

1. Rear (Wilbers 640) shock:
Just finished installing it over the weekend by myself replacing the stock shock. (first time).
The Wilbers fit perfect. The only difficult part is getting the cushion bolt and upper and lower shock bolts out and reinstalled to the correct torque.
The most difficult part is those 3 bolts. Once that's done, the stock shock falls right out.

I used a front and rear stand, and my car scissors jack under the engine with a piece of wood. Worked great.
Tip: When getting that cushion bolt out/in, make minor adjustments up/down with the scissor jack. It comes out easy/hard depending on how much load there is.
You will also need a breaker bar.

I've taken one ride over a well-known bumpy road. I noticed the improvement immediately with settings from the factory.
I have not changed the default damping (6/22 clicks) or default preload. I guess I need to set my 'sag' but I'm not sure how.
I'll update more once I've really "exercised" it, but right now I'm extremely pleased. This is the shock it should have had all along.

2. Ohlins Front Cartridge Kit:
Ok, here is where things went south.

After ordering (and paying upfront) for the kit, and waiting 2 months, Ohlins informed my suspension guy (an authorized reseller) that my kit is on "backorder".
The earliest date is June 2023. They will have 3 kits available by that date, and 2 are already sold.
I declined to wait and cancelled my order.

We discussed other options, and went with replacing the springs and oil. I've ordered "RaceTech" springs, and he will install those instead.
My suspension guy has been very helpful, and was surprised as well, as Ohlins listed they had one available.

I guess I didn't appreciate the way I (a paying customer) was treated by Ohlins.

I'll update on how the RT springs and oil worked out.
I'll have to remove the front forks and deliver them to him to rebuild. Should be in this week from RT.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have questions.

My SV last weekend:

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Automotive lighting Automotive tire
 

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Man that ohlins situation sucks. I'd be pissed if they told me after two months of waiting that I'll get parts in 7 months...
But I guess springs for your weight and oil will be 90% there, and much cheaper probably.

Nice to hear about the shock! Most people say it makes bigger difference than the fork upgrade.
Are you changing the pipes too or did you remove it just to have easier access to the shock?
 

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I've taken one ride over a well-known bumpy road. I noticed the improvement immediately with settings from the factory.
I have not changed the default damping (6/22 clicks) or default preload. I guess I need to set my 'sag' but I'm not sure how.
Its pretty easy but you need a strong person to give you a hand:

Pick a spot on your tail piece directly above the rear axle on the RH side and put a piece of electrical tape on there horizontally that you can use either the top or bottom edge of as a reference point.
Now get your assistant to pull the bike over on the side stand so the rear shock is completely unloaded. Rest your tape measure on the top of the axle nut and measure to your tape line. Note that measurement.
Put your riding kit on and wheel the bike over by a wall or a bench for you to lean on as you sit on the bike in the riding position. Now get your assistant to measure between those same two points again.
Subtract the second measurement from the first measurement and that is your rider sag figure. For road riding you want to be in the 30-35mm area (others will disagree I'm sure haha). Adjust the spring preload ring(s) on your shock until your ball park.

For the front its the same gig but just measure the amount of chrome stanchion showing between the top of the dust seal and the bottom of the bottom yoke with a steel rule when its pulled over on the side stand. For road riding your looking for 35-40mm sag with you on the bike. I wouldnt bother mucking around measuring bike only (static) sags as its when your actually riding the thing that matters most. Have you fitted spring preload adjusters to your front forks yet? They're cheap as chips off ebay if you haven't.

Hope this helps, get back to me if any of its confusing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Man that ohlins situation sucks. I'd be pissed if they told me after two months of waiting that I'll get parts in 7 months...
But I guess springs for your weight and oil will be 90% there, and much cheaper probably.

Nice to hear about the shock! Most people say it makes bigger difference than the fork upgrade.
Are you changing the pipes too or did you remove it just to have easier access to the shock?
Yes, that's what I'm hoping. If I can get 90% there, I'm happy. And yes, I was totally pissed.

I changed the pipe to a Yoshimura Alpha Carbon (slip-on) a few months ago:
Again, an outstanding improvement and worthwhile investment. Highly recommended.
My Ducati Monster riding partners always comment on the amazing sound of the Yoshi. I concur.

Yes, you have to remove the entire exhaust (see pic) or you won't be able to use a jack to lift under the engine block.
It also makes it easier to get at the lower bolts I mentioned.
It's not hard at all. I ordered exhaust gaskets, but the original ones looked fine to me.

I readily admit to being a SV "fanboy". I love the bike. IMHO, if you invest in these 3 things:
1. Exhaust.
2. Front Suspension
3. Rear Shock
You basically have the "perfect" bike that always puts a smile on your face.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Its pretty easy but you need a strong person to give you a hand:

Pick a spot on your tail piece directly above the rear axle on the RH side and put a piece of electrical tape on there horizontally that you can use either the top or bottom edge of as a reference point.
Now get your assistant to pull the bike over on the side stand so the rear shock is completely unloaded. Rest your tape measure on the top of the axle nut and measure to your tape line. Note that measurement.
Put your riding kit on and wheel the bike over by a wall or a bench for you to lean on as you sit on the bike in the riding position. Now get your assistant to measure between those same two points again.
Subtract the second measurement from the first measurement and that is your rider sag figure. For road riding you want to be in the 30-35mm area (others will disagree I'm sure haha). Adjust the spring preload ring(s) on your shock until your ball park.

For the front its the same gig but just measure the amount of chrome stanchion showing between the top of the dust seal and the bottom of the bottom yoke with a steel rule when its pulled over on the side stand. For road riding your looking for 35-40mm sag with you on the bike. I wouldnt bother mucking around measuring bike only (static) sags as its when your actually riding the thing that matters most. Have you fitted spring preload adjusters to your front forks yet? They're cheap as chips off ebay if you haven't.

Hope this helps, get back to me if any of its confusing.
Thanks @Kiwi Rider,
This is really awesome. Let me digest this a bit and give it a try. The electrical tape for a reference point is a great idea.
I've watched some YT video's but I came away even more confused about this 'sag' business, but I know it's important.
Very helpful.
 

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Burt, should you reconsider the cartridge route for front suspension, there are alternatives: Andreani, Mupo, Matris at least.

I went with Mupo Caliber 22, because the cartridge installation didn't require any modification to the fork tubes, therefore you can always go back to initial setup and sell the cartridge if you wish so.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Burt, should you reconsider the cartridge route for front suspension, there are alternatives: Andreani, Mupo, Matris at least.

I went with Mupo Caliber 22, because the cartridge installation didn't require any modification to the fork tubes, therefore you can always go back to initial setup and sell the cartridge if you wish so.
Hi @Skywalker67
This is a very interesting option.

I was not aware of the brand and my suspension guy didn't offer it as an option.

Did you order these directly from Mupo?
Did you install them yourself? If so, how difficult was it?
Are the springs included in the cost? (Ohlins springs were an additional cost. BTW, those are special springs that only fit Ohlins cartridges).

Thanks for replying.
 
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