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Background:
In order for a gas engine to run properly you need a 15 to 1 air to fuel ratio. The SV's fuel injection isn't very smart and it's limited number of sensors aren't capable of compensating for modifications.

For emissions reasons your bike comes from the factory a little on the lean side. When you mod your bike with an aftermarket exhaust or modified air box for example, you make it even more lean. The lean condition is especially evident after modifying the exhaust as a loud popping noise will result. To compensate for this and to get the best performance out of your bike you need to add more fuel. There are several products on the market to do this...

Please note that the exact use of these products is surely complex and is outside the scope of this (brief) tutorial.

Teka and Yoshimura.
Though very different devices they both perform a similar function; they allow you to modify the stock ECU as you desire. The stock ECU (Engine Control Unit) is what's commonly known in electronics lingo as EEPROM (Electronically Erasable Programable Read Only Memory). Simply put this means that unless it's put into a "program mode" the stock ECU and it's fuel map are strictly read only. The Teka and Yoshimura systems put the ECU in this mode and allow you to increase or decrease fuel signals under different conditions. After you get it where you want it, you write the new fuel map to the ECU and disconnect the device. With the changes made directly to the ECU you no longer need the device attached. These are handy for a shop where they can use the same device to re-map many bikes.
The Yosh box sells for ~$400.
The Teka box sells for ~$600.

The Power Commander and Techlusion boxs are very different from the Yosh and Teka in that they are installed on the bike and are permanently tied into the ECU. They do not modify the ECU or stock fuel map, they instead modify the signals that are sent from the ECU to the injectors. By modifying the signal to the injectors they can change how long the injector stays open, the longer it stays open the more fuel in injected into the engine. These devices are however very different from each other...

Techlusion:
The techlusion box is fairly simple and is therefore seems pretty easy to work with. It has a few dials for how much fuel you want to add and where you want to add it. You can not use it to lean out areas of the map, only to richen them.
The Techlusion box sells for ~$200

Power Commander:
The Power Commander is a much more sophisticated device but as is the case with all tools, the more it can do the more complicated it us to use. It's very similar to the Techlusion except that it's virtually infinitely adjustable and custom maps can easily be swapped. What gives it it's flexibility is the use of a computer interface and software. Using any desktop or laptop computer you can upload and download files to the Power Commander. You can also find custom maps on the internet, download them to your computer and then upload them to the Power Commander in minutes. You can also view these maps and customize them as you like.
While uploading and downloading them is simple making sense of them or midifying them is definitely not simple for the average person. I have only limited exposure to the software and it did not appear simple nor intuitive. This gives limitless customizing power to anyone looking for maximum performance but the typical rider may want to stick to the maps that can be found on-line.
The Power Commander sells for ~$300.
 

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I'd like to comment on your air/fuel ratio. In ideal conditions 14.6:1 will give you 100% combustion. However these bikes do not run in ideal conditions, and a more commonly safe accepted a/f ration would be around 13:1. I'd side on being more conservative about the a/f ratio, and never instruct someone to street tune for 15:1.
 

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Pardon my ignorance, but if you re-map with a controller, does it take care of the issues addresed with a TRE?

Thanks, Ste
 

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Pardon my ignorance, but if you re-map with a controller, does it take care of the issues addresed with a TRE?

Thanks, Ste
In short, no.


ps. Hi Donnie ;D
 

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i can't believe this is a sticky. there are lots of assumptions that are not really fact in that post.
 

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Uh oh...... here we go. Kris is gonna brake out the dyno sheets showing the power commander is a waste of money on a supersport bike and **** everyone off.......
 

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like was mentioned, you dont want to tune for a 15:1 a/f ratio...i've found the bikes run better a little richer, between 12.5-13:1. also, all of the bikes i've ever dyno'd didnt really care about the a/f ratio when it came to hp. you didnt say that, but its true for the most part.

also most of the bikes i've seen have been rich from the factory. why everyone thinks they're lean is beyond me. not that there cant be any, but not the majority i've seen. also, adding a pipe and aftermarket filter wont lean it out enough to make it run poorly. i feel like i have some of the best bikes in the paddock every year, and i've never ran a power commander. i did the first year, tuned it every way, didnt make a difference, so i sold it. they're useful in some applications/motor configurations ( i have to run one on my desleeved SV600).

your information you posted on how the different products work is excellent.
 

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I have a power commander and it really doesn't seem to do much on a stock engine. I haven't spent hours on a dyno with fifferent fuels but I'd say the average guy doesn't need it. I'm in the process of installing a big bore kit, 42mm throttle bodies, and 1st gen int cams on the exhaust side. It will be interesting to see what kind of mapping I end up with when it's done..... It will also be interesting to see how long the crank lasts.......ba-boom!!
 

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I had a D&D Full Exhaust installed without any tuning and it gave me 77.58 HP. I had a TEKA tune and ended up with 79.25HP. The bike runs smoother now. The CO2 measurements shows that the bike is not running lean, but actually running rich from 4-7k RPM. The engineer actually leaned it out significantly in this range. From 7-8k the engineer did richen the mixture with more fuel. Overall through out the rev range, the graph shows more leaning out of the mixture rather than increasing fuel.

 

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thanks for sharing kwakr738. great info. With the oxygenated race fuel that Kris uses, I bet that rich spot goes away with the OEM ECU. That's a healthy SV, specially on a Factory dyno!
 

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thanks for sharing kwakr738. great info. With the oxygenated race fuel that Kris uses, I bet that rich spot goes away with the OEM ECU. That's a healthy SV, specially on a Factory dyno!
The bike is 2005 with about 3800 miles. I bought it 2nd hand from an owner that looked like he babied it. During the run, it had a stock intake and was running on a fresh tank of 93 octane. I have to be honest, I am somewhat skeptical of the results. I have read of people seeing 5-10% increase in HP going from an Eddy to Dynojet. Depending on how you calculate for loss, I can easily blow by HP numbers I have seen on this board. The important thing is that the bike runs smoother and there is an increase in HP after the TEKA tune. I am also happy to be able to provide my experience and results with a person considering this option. If there is another option out there with "proven" results, please post here:
http://forum.svrider.com/showthread.php?t=57886

P.S. Another reason may be yellow is faster than blue :)
 

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dyno results can vary wildly. i really think they're only beneficial to see what kind of gains/losses can be made from changes on the bike. peak hp can be manipulated by the dyno/dyno operator. its quite easy. while i have no doubt this bike probably is running better after the tune, no way its making 79 hp with a stock engine and that pipe. my supersport engine with leo vince and the best race gas vp makes barely makes more hp than that. like i said, its all relative.

but on another note, i'm glad someone finally had proven dyno results to confirm that not all sv's are lean with a pipe. i told you it would be rich!!!!!!
 

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Kris!! My Bike makes more HP than your bike!! Yellow is faster than blue!! Just kidding. I am going to have to agree with you, I feel the numbers are pretty wild. Just so you know, I kept pushing with the service dept to get me those darn A/F ratios. The manager called his lead engineer who wasn't even working that day. As you will read on the other post where our wager was set, Eddy does not measure A/F. But the engineer clearly leaned out the bike on most areas for better HP. They did give me a bigger graph of the CO2 levels that I have yet to scan. But yeah, your right, this lean thing is based on assumption.
 

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Here are the CO2 levels. The original is in RED. The blue is how the engineer tuned for HP.
You can see where they lowered the levels of CO2 or leaned out the mixture.
 

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ok then any one know where I can find the interface program for the PCIII. I did not buy it so I do not know if it comes with it or what>>?
 

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Lean from the factory? ? ? that makes no sense at all. They all run rich if anything. Have you ever thought about elevation? The factory engineers would never chance.
 
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